Studio KO

Home and away in Paris

Photo by François Halard

In these complicated times, the concept of a domestic refuge couldn’t be more appealing. Designing an apartment for clients in Paris’s Saint-Germain-des-Prés neighborhood, Karl Fournier (right) and Olivier Marty, of Studio KO, looked to the island of Naoshima, off the coast of Japan, as a touchstone for escape from city life. Architect Tadao Ando’s otherworldly stone and concrete Benesse House museum informed their choice of a hushed palette, complemented by a sculptural oak fireplace surround of their own design and a textured travertine low table by Pierre Culot. But the Studio KO founders are not mimics, and the mood here is distinctly urbane. Lounging fireside on a Christophe Delcourt sofa or a T.H. Robsjohn-Gibbings daybed, or curled up in a pair of rush-seated CH22 chairs by Hans Wegner, the owners needn’t get on a plane to feel utterly transported.

Photo by Noel Manalili

We try to approach the project with a fresh gaze, not to reproduce or impose a style but to listen and learn from our clients.”
— Karl Fournier and Olivier Marty

Designer Picks

Jacques-Henri Varichon for Steiner Galaxie Chair, ca. 1969, Offered by Archive 20th Century
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Jacques-Henri Varichon for Steiner Galaxie Chair, ca. 1969, Offered by Archive 20th Century

“We love this Varichon chair — unjustly unloved, as it looks like an instrument of torture although it is perfectly comfortable. But every time we put it in our projects, it goes out the window.”

Marc Held for Knoll International Pair of Culbuto Armchairs, 1967, Offered by Galerie Glustin
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Marc Held for Knoll International Pair of Culbuto Armchairs, 1967, Offered by Galerie Glustin

Because of our love for Marc Held, whom we have known since childhood, and for his slightly A Clockwork Orange side. A must-have for any design collector”

Carlo Scarpa for Venini Pair of Murano Glass Wall Lights, 1949, Offered by Angela Ball London
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Carlo Scarpa for Venini Pair of Murano Glass Wall Lights, 1949, Offered by Angela Ball London

“The work of the architect Carlo Scarpa has always been a great source of inspiration. His collaboration with the Murano workshops reveals a close link between the architect and the master glassmakers. Everything is in this link between thought, drawing and the man’s hand completing the gesture to end up with an extraordinary object.”

Poul Kjærholm Set of 4 PK9 Chairs, Mid-20th Century, Offered by NOMMAD
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Poul Kjærholm Set of 4 PK9 Chairs, Mid-20th Century, Offered by NOMMAD

“These chairs by Poul Kjærholm often save the day. They are so beautiful and their design so obvious that they can be adapted to a wide range of configurations. Glass, marble, wood, classic, modern, contemporary — they bridge the gap between them all with elegance.”

Doris Leslie Blau Collection Art Deco–Inspired Rug, Contemporary
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Doris Leslie Blau Collection Art Deco–Inspired Rug, Contemporary

We like rugs that make you want to take your shoes off. And when it’s a Delaunay pattern, as here, it almost has to be! Color and pattern are perfect ways to create tension in architecturally raw spaces.”

Venus Figure, 1957, Sorel Etrog, Offered by Caviar20
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Venus Figure, 1957, Sorel Etrog, Offered by Caviar20

A sculpture in an interior is essential. Art on the walls is good, but within the space, it is even better, because it interacts with us through the body. And an interior without art is disappointing, like a chicken that doesn’t lay an egg.”

Gae Aulenti for Artemide Pair of Patroclo Table Lamps, 1975, Offered by Enrica De Micheli
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Gae Aulenti for Artemide Pair of Patroclo Table Lamps, 1975, Offered by Enrica De Micheli

“We were lucky enough to get to really know Gae Aulenti through Marella Agnelli. And learned so much from her. We are very sensitive to her work, especially the design.”

Maria Pergay Silvered-Metal and Agate Decorative Box, ca. 1970, Offered by Unforget Decorative Arts
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Maria Pergay Silvered-Metal and Agate Decorative Box, ca. 1970, Offered by Unforget Decorative Arts

A box because you always need one. There are so many ugly things to hide from view, starting with the remote controls that have invaded our daily lives for the past forty years and yet are still so ugly.”

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