CASIRAGHI

Paris mix, not match

All photos by Cerruti Draime

Living in the past can be a young person’s game — or so Fabrizio Casiraghi seems to be saying with his design of an airy kitchen for a Paris sophisticate. And it can be a really fabulous game to play. Here, the Italian-born Casiraghi makes history not just sexy but relevant, as he reprises the practical beauty of lacquer walls, a zinc counter, a travertine floor. The magic comes in his juxtapositions. “When you mix Art Deco chairs with a wooden table with Japanese Noguchi lamps, it could seem risky,” he says blithely. “But at the end, it is totally harmonious.” The furnishings are a combination of antique (chairs from 1stDibs) and bespoke (dining table, sconces), with a gentlemen’s club providing the overall inspiration. But really, it derives from Casiraghi’s own fecund imagination

I think people ask me to do their interiors if they want to avoid ostentatious design and if they prefer an effortlessly chic atmosphere.”
— Fabrizio Casiraghi

Designer Picks

Isamu Noguchi Akari Floor Lamp, 1970s, Offered by Social Objects
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Isamu Noguchi Akari Floor Lamp, 1970s, Offered by Social Objects

“I always love Noguchi. Everything he does is chic and sophisticated but at the same time traditional and essential.”

Charles Dudouyt Art Deco Oak Dining Table, 1940s, Offered by MORENTZ
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Charles Dudouyt Art Deco Oak Dining Table, 1940s, Offered by MORENTZ

“I like this kind of very massive Art Deco table. It gives me the feeling of reassurance and solidity a table needs to have in my opinion.”

René Lalique Bacchantes Vase, 1946–50, Offered by FAS Antiques and Modern
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René Lalique Bacchantes Vase, 1946–50, Offered by FAS Antiques and Modern

“My mother has had a collection of Lalique vases since I was a child, and since then I have always appreciated the pureness of their shapes and their incredible poetry.”

Maxime Old Set of 6 Oak Dining Chairs, ca. 1940, Offered by Calderwood Gallery
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Maxime Old Set of 6 Oak Dining Chairs, ca. 1940, Offered by Calderwood Gallery

“I am Milanese, and all Milanese have a thing with lozenges. In Milan, you can find them everywhere: on balconies, entrances, floors — it’s very Portaluppi.”

American Modernist Frame, ca. 1930, Offered by Door Number 3
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American Modernist Frame, ca. 1930, Offered by Door Number 3

“Usually, the frame is more important than what we decide to put inside. We can have a twenty-dollar watercolor bought at a flea market, but if we decide to frame it with something like this one, the watercolor will look like a museum piece.”

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