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Reginald Marsh
Summer at the Pier

About the Item

Signed lower left: R. MARSH
  • Creator:
    Reginald Marsh (1898-1954, American)
  • Dimensions:
    Height: 17.88 in (45.42 cm)Width: 21.88 in (55.58 cm)
  • Medium:
  • Movement & Style:
  • Period:
  • Condition:
    All works are in good to excellent condition. Detailed condition report available upon request.
  • Gallery Location:
    New York, NY
  • Reference Number:
    1stDibs: LU1191147033
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