Go Inside a Sprawling 1920s Hollywood Hills Estate

Interior designer Mark D. Sikes emphasized the indoor-outdoor fusion of Southern California living.

Mark D. Sikes is one prolific polymath. In addition to maintaining his photo-filled lifestyle blog and launching his chic ready-to-wear line Stripes, Sikes also maintains a bustling interior design practice — it was just announced that he’ll be collaborating with actress Reese Witherspoon on a flagship boutique for her Draper James collection. Sikes’ classic, all-American approach to interiors looks clean, crisp and fresh in any setting. Wanting to hear a little bit more about his process, we stole a few minutes of our busy Saturday Shopper’s time to have him walk us through one of his latest projects: a gorgeous estate nestled in the Hollywood Hills. Scroll down to see images of the home, and find out what color combination Sikes thinks is always in style.


“This 1920s home combines Mediterranean and Hollywood Regency styles, and it’s especially notable for its more traditional floor plan,” says Mark. “This project entailed a complete renovation, including converting the former kitchen into a great room, and opening up the indoor areas to foster connections with the outdoors. The garden is the soul of this house! Both inside and out, this home is a perfect example California elegance, and indoor-outdoor living at its best.”

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“In California it’s all about indoor-outdoor living. Connecting interiors with adjacent outdoor areas expands spaces for lounging and entertaining.”


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“I love a neutral palette with lots of textured, natural fiber rugs, linen, and wicker mixed with gilt, chinoiserie, plus my signature blue and white accents to create elegant, yet comfortable spaces.”


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“There is nothing better than an all-white kitchen. I think kitchens are the heart of the home and should be well thought-out — fixtures, hardware, and lighting bring these spaces to life.”


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“I use a lot of chinoiserie wallpapers — Gracie Studio is my go-to — there is nothing more beautiful than a hand-painted wall covering. The use of trees, birds, water and flowers in the imagery brings the beauty of the outdoors inside.”


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“I’m drawn to neutrals because they never grow old. I like to mix neutral textiles in paisleys, ikats and stripes, layering them with saddle brown leather, wicker and bamboo.”


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“The color blue is not only beautiful but also relaxing and calming. A blue bedroom is always a good choice, especially when using a mix of prints, solids, and stripes. I’ve never seen a blue and white stripe I didn’t love!”


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“I’m a fan of anything blue and white — especially blue and white Portuguese tiles.”


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“Interior designer Billy Baldwin was known for chocolate-brown rooms with white accents and furnishings, and I’ve always thought that there’s something sexy about that combination. It looked good then and it still looks good today.”


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“I like to mix blue and white boxes, objects, and books in my vignettes. Stacking, leaning and clustering art always makes a room feel modern and collected.”


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“Painting a small space black and adding a mirror is dramatic and chic. I’ve done this in a bathroom, a butler’s pantry and in a few bars.”


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“Boxwood, ficus, and fig ivy create the perfect backdrop for outdoor living spaces — there’s nothing like a lush green garden. You can also see why blue and white are my signature colors: they look just as good outside as they do inside.”


To see more from interior designer Mark D. Sikes, shop his curated collection on 1stdibs.


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