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Marcel Mouly
Les Grandes Voiles (The Grand Sails)

c. 1960s

About the Item

Hand-Signed by the Artist Lower Right Titled Lower Center Inscribed "Epreuve d'Artist" (Artist's Proof) Lower Left Framed: 25.5 x 32.75 inches Site Size: 19 x 26.5 inches Marcel Mouly (1918 - January 7, 2008) was a French artist. He was the last living student of Picasso and a protégé of Fernand Leger. He was considered one of the greatest contemporary artists of the century. He is influenced by Braque, Matisse, and mostly Picasso. Matisse influenced Mouly in the Fauvist use of color that is apparent in all Mouly's paintings. 1935, after studying painting at the French Academies, Marcel began to display his work publicly. His first public one person show was in 1949 at the Libraire Bergamasque in Paris. Mouly's work is exhibited in museums such as the Musee Nationale d'art Modern in the Centre Georges Pompidou and the Bibliothèque Nationale in Paris, Musee de Geneve in Switzerland, the SFMOMA in San Francisco, and numerous other museums, more than 20 around the world. He received two of France's highest art awards: the Chevalier de L'Ordre des Arts et Lettres in 1957 and the Premier Prix de Lithographie in 1973. Mouly died at age 89 on January 7, 2008.
  • Creator:
    Marcel Mouly (1918 - 2008, French)
  • Creation Year:
    c. 1960s
  • Dimensions:
    Height: 19 in (48.26 cm)Width: 26.5 in (67.31 cm)
  • Medium:
  • Movement & Style:
  • Period:
  • Condition:
  • Gallery Location:
    Missouri, MO
  • Reference Number:
    1stDibs: LU74738428392
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