29 Wondrous Winter Homes & Ski Chalets

This time of year, the cozy ski-lodge look is at its most inviting, whether you're off to the slopes or just dreaming of them.
Cashmere Interior
Photo courtesy of Cashmere Interior

“We wanted a rustic-modern ski chalet that also embraces a bohemian farmhouse vibe,” says Cashmere Interior owner and principal designer Charlene Petersen, describing the firm’s scheme for a Big Sky, Montana, home whose centerpiece is this high-ceilinged, white-walled living room.

To make the space ultra-comfy, Petersen outfitted it wih Verellen sofas and swivel chairs, a custom antler chandelier and a Moroccan carpet from Esmaili Rugs.


Workshop
Photo by Donna Dotan

In designing a vacation home just north of New York City, Workshop/APD drew inspiration from the surrounding countryside as well as the stone barns of the former Rockefeller estate in Pocantico Hills. The vintage Beni Ourain runner adds warmth to the contemporary entry hall.


Photo by Kerry Kirk

“We wanted to make sure everyone dining had a view of the Montana mountainside, which is why we included a large Kelly Wearstler mirror for reflection above the buffet,” says designer Ashton Taylor. The Houston, TX-based designer wanted to create a space that captured the essence of the mountains without losing the room’s contemporary edge.

To keep the dining area elevated, Taylor installed a custom chandelier from Apparatus, Fendi Casa chairs and Rimadesio dining table.


Victoria Hagan

Always seeking to incorporate nature into her interiors, Victoria Hagan kept the focus on the unparalleled mountain view in this Aspen, Colorado, bedroom. Among the crisp white furnishings are a custom upholstered bed and a pair of Roman Thomas chairs covered in Donghia fabric.


 Gary McBournie Inc.
Photo by Gordon Beall

With its 30-foot ceiling, this Big Sky living room presented quite a challenge, but Gary McBournie succeeded in making it as cozy as it is dramatic with refined furnishings and custom patterned carpets.


Kylee Shintaffer
Photo by Eric Piasecki

Kylee Shintaffer modeled her scheme for a winter retreat in Montana on an authentic mountain lodge. “The timbers and paneling are reclaimed corral board,” says the Seattle-based designer, “and have a silvery-gray undertone with touches of icy-green lichen.”

The teak chairs, inspired by Hans Wegner, are upholstered in an outdoor Holly Hunt fabric, to withstand exposure to some snow and wintry weather. “The home is ski-in, ski-out,” explains Shintaffer, “and this is the perfect après-ski spot to wrap up in a big Pendleton blanket and snuggle in front of the fire and enjoy the great outdoors.”


 Bryan O'Sullivan
Photo by James McDonald

“Behind the strong facade lies an oasis from the harsh conditions,” says Bryan O’Sullivan, describing his snug vision for a new-build chalet set on a slope in the French Alps. “The house has a warm interior of layered textures and tonal timber that provides a softened atmosphere.”


M. Elle
Photo by Miguel Flores-Vianna Photography

The vaulted timber ceiling, dramatic chandelier and wall of built-in bookshelves create a feel at once airy and welcoming in the dining room of a Sun Valley, Idaho, home by M. Elle Design.


Photo by Miguel Flores-Vianna Photography

The living room of the Sun Valley home mixes rustic style with modern elements, like the steel surround on the brick fireplace.


Todhunter Earle
Photo by Oliver Clarke

Country meets glamour in this Samantha Todhunter–designed Aspen game room, which combines walls clad in barn wood with a Todd Merrill tufted sectional and an area rug by Suzanne Sharp for the Rug Company.


Ken Fulk
Photo by Douglas Friedman

At a house dubbed Sky High, in Big Sky, Montana, designer Ken Fulk outfitted the master bedroom with plenty of fur, a custom four-poster bed and an antique antler chairs. At the unveiling of the completed residence, Fulk surprised the homeowners, who are his friends, with dinner and a performance by a bluegrass band.


Frank de Biasi
Photo courtesy of FDBI

In this Aspen living room, Frank de Biasi balanced quirky elements, like a psychedelic painting by Alex Ross, a Lapis Lazuli table by Ado Chale and a polka-dotted wool and silk rug from Studio Four, with comfy pieces, like overstuffed armchairs and fur throw pillows.


Kristin Dittmar
Photo courtesy of ArtStar

In the dining area of an Aspen home by local designer Kristin Dittmar, a Sonneman light fixture hangs over the custom gray-stained table and benches. The artwork, Gray Brushstrokes 1 by Briggs Solomon, is from ArtStar.


Marion Licjtig
Photo by David Loftus

Marion Lichtig designed Chalet Kernow in Verbier, Switzerland, whose cozy living room features overstuffed sofas, a fur-topped ottoman and a fireplace with a stone surround.


Photo by David Loftus

One of Chalet Kernow’s six bedrooms features six built-in bunks with large storage drawers underneath.


Pierre Yovanovitch
Photo by Jean-François Jaussaud / LUXPRODUCTIONS

Pierre Yovanovitch Architecture d’Intérieur designed this modernist vacation home in Andermatt, Switzerland, which features a curving built-in sofa with triangular and spherical throw pillows.


Photo by Jean-François Jaussaud / LUXPRODUCTIONS

A set of glass pendant lights resembling chunks of ice are suspended from the wooden ceiling in the Andermatt home.


Jeff Andrews
Photo by Grey Crawford

Dramatic floor-to-ceiling stonework, rustic wood beams and built-in bookshelves give this Lake Tahoe family vacation home by Jeff Andrews the comfortable, inviting vibe they were seeking.


Noé Duchaufour-Lawrance
Photo by Vincent Leroux

Noé Duchaufour-Lawrance designed the Chalet La Transhumance, a family vacation home in the French Alps, with a fireplace rising from the concrete floor in the main room. He focused on three materials in the space: wood, Alps Vals stone and waxed concrete.


Cullman & Kravis
Photo by David Marlow

The bar and game room of this Cullman & Kravis-designed ranch home in Vail, Colorado, is divided into several distinct areas for leisure activities, like playing board games, watching a movie, shooting pool or lounging by the fire.


Oppenheim Architecture + Design
Photo by Laziz Hamani

Oppenheim Architecture + Design renovated La Muna — this Aspen, Colorado, chalet — with the Japanese concept of wabi-sabi in mind. Wooden accents and linen-covered sofas add warmth and texture to the minimalist space.


Photo by Laziz Hamani

La Muna’s simple, rustic kitchen keeps the focus on the striking mountain views outside.


Photo by Colefax and Fowler

This comfortably eclectic Swizz chalet by Philip Hooper for Sybil Colefax & John Fowler includes plenty of seating, like overstuffed sofas and tufted velvet benches, making it ideal for après-ski gatherings.


Photo by Colefax and Fowler

The breakfast nook of the Hooper-designed chalet features a tufted banquette and chairs, all upholstered in the same striped fabric. The Roman shade’s vibrant fabric pops against the neutral palette.


Sara Story
Photo by David Marlow

Sara Story designed this contemporary Aspen chalet, where this bedroom features a brass and opaque glass chandelier and a sitting area with a pair of Vladimir Kagan Shorty sofas.


Ezralow Design
Photo by Yves Garneau

The quaint dining nook of this Swiss chalet by Ezralow Design features a U-shaped banquette topped with throw pillows and a pair of wooden stools draped with sheepskins.


2Michaels
Photo by Jeff McNamara

2Michaels reimagined the interiors for Garrison House, which was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright protégé Edgar A. Tafel in 1948. The red leather wingback chairs is by Børge Mogensen, and the armchairs are by Ingemar Thillmark.


No. 12 Interiors
Photo by David Marlow, courtesy of Eleven

No. 12 Interiors designed this sunny breakfast nook at Chalet Pelerin in Le Miroir, France, featured in the book Hotel Chic at Home. The firm commissioned the custom banquette to accommodate the height of the antique French Savoyard table, and the room gets a cozy boost from the sheepskins draped over the wooden dining chairs.


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