30 Smartly Organized Mudrooms

These useful little rooms should be gracious as well as functional. Browse 30 storage-friendly spaces, and get inspired to step up your organization game.
30 Smartly Organized Mudrooms

Hendricks Churchill made this mudroom in a Weston, Connecticut, country home a study in color contrasts, juxtaposing heather-gray paneled walls with charcoal-hued floors. Photo by Tim Lenz

Beach house by Josh Greene Design in Sagaponack, NY

“Forget the foyer,” says Josh Greene. “Mudrooms are often the real entry of the house!” With that in mind, Greene outfitted the mudroom of a Sagaponack, New York, beach house with black limestone flooring and an antique green cupboard that made the white-washed space feel both welcoming and lived in. Photo by Eric Piasecki

Kemble Interiors mudroom in Long Island, NY

“Having an attractive mudroom is essential to the tone you set for the aesthetic of any home,” says designer Jennifer Tonkel, of Kemble Interiors. In this Long Island, New York, mudroom, Tonkel established a refined and contemporary mode, adding a touch of playfulness in the bentwood hooks. Photo by Ball & Albanese

Pasadena mudroom by Kelly Ferm

“With fashion as my second love, I always start with something from the closet that inspires my designs,” says Kelly Ferm. “The Astrologie scarf by Hermès set the stage for this small Pasadena mudroom’s palette.” Photo by Peter Valli

Country house mudroom by Huniford Design Studio in Sagaponack, NY

In converting a 100-year-old Sagaponack potato barn into a stylish country home, James, of Huniford Design Studio, created a mudroom with a rustic English feel. In addition to a banquette looking out at the landscaping and gardens, it “features antique pine floors, English floral wallpaper and a 19th-century tavern table,” LeBlanc notes. Photo by Eric Striffler

mudroom by ABD Studio in Truckee, CA

ABD Studio built this bright and sunny mountain house in Lake Tahoe’s Martis Camp enclave as a summer getaway and winter ski retreat, giving it a mudroom that suits both seasons. Says founder and principal Brittany Haines, “We maximized the amount of closed cabinetry for hidden storage while also keeping some open space for easily accessible hooks for jackets and hats, as well as baskets to hold shoes.” Photo by Suzanna Scott

With this stylish yet simple mudroom, Bridget Beari Designs makes a strong case for white oak. The space, serving as entry to an Alys Beach, Florida, beach house, “is the perfect place to drop those beach bags and sandals before heading upstairs,” says firm founder Susan Jamieson. Photo by Joe Bernado

Laura Fox mudroom in Maine

In a nod to its maritime location, Laura Fox swathed the mudroom of an early 20th-century coastal Maine home in a soothing blue. The result is far from boring. “Creating multiple textures throughout the space really allowed an otherwise monochromatic mudroom to shine,” Fox says. Photo by Francois Gagne

Mark Ashby Design mudroom in Texas

“We hid the day-to-day functional clutter from the mudroom by placing it behind a wall of beautiful white cabinets. Then, we brightened the space up with crisp, beautiful tile from Cle Tile,” says Christina Simon of this Texas mudroom outside Johnson City. Photo by Bret Gum

Mendelson Group

This Mendelson Group–designed mudroom in a Westchester, New York, Tudor home radiates serenity. A soft color palette paired with warm metal accents and plush cushions provides an ideal introduction to the rest of the house. Photo by Eric Piasecki

Tammy Connor Interior Design

Tammy Connor Interior Design captured the warmth of the South in this Sewanee, Tennessee, cabin. The vintage wooden table is the perfect place to store a laundry basket. Photo by Erica George Dines

Chango & Co.

Nothing says beach cottage quite like blue, white and wicker. Chang & Co. masterfully designed this rather narrow mudroom in Bay Head, New Jersey, with coastal vibes in mind. Photo by Jacob Snavely

Kylee Shintaffer Design

An island retreat in San Juan, Washington, wouldn’t be complete without rustic touches — like the wooden bench and plush throw blanket that West Coast designer Kylee Shintaffer used to complement the clean and simple lines she gave this mudroom. Photo by Eric Piasecki

Frederick Tang Architecture

Frederick Tang Architecture deployed hanging knobs, a subdued color scheme and contemporary elements, including a large circular mirror and metallic sconces, to create a quintessentially cool Brooklyn mudroom, as simple as it is chic. Photo by David Land

Louise Holt Design Ltd

This Louise Holt Design mudroom in Oxfordshire, U.K., is the epitome of English country style, with its misty-colored walls, pale woods and, of course, a line of wellies. Photo courtesy of Louise Holt Design

Timothy Godbold

The funky tiled floor takes center stage in this mudroom in a Bridgehampton estate. Designed by Timothy Godbold with a bold black-and-white palette, it doubles as a chic laundry room. Photo by Alec Hemer

Massachusetts mudroom by Studio Dykas

In performing a gut-renovation of a 1920s estate in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, Studio Dykas updated and created new spaces, like this large mudroom with a built-in bench flanked by closets. Photo by Eric Roth

Blackberry Farm mudroom by Suzanne Kasler

At Blackberry Farm, in Knoxville, Tennessee, Suzanne Kasler outfitted the mudroom with a distressed painted armoire. Photo by Erica George Dines

mudroom by Shawn Henderson

This mudroom/reading nook in designer Shawn Henderson’s Hillsdale, New York, home features a custom bench topped by a long cushion and pillows, with a pair of baskets underneath for extra storage. Photo by Steven Freihon

Ash NYC elevated this Nantucket entryway by painting the walls, coat hooks and bench the same deep blue and adding brass hardware to the under-bench drawers. Photo by Christian Harder

Maine mudroom by Jayne Design Studio

Warm beadboard walls and elegant furniture bring traditional charm to this Penobscot Bay, Maine, home’s mudroom by Jayne Design Studio. Photo by Jonathan Wallen

In updating this apartment in a 1928 Brooklyn building, Workstead outfitted the mudroom with a custom-built unit that includes both open and closed storage compartments. Photo by Matthew Williams

This Long Island, New York, home by Celerie Kemble features floral wallpaper by Lee Jofa and a solid bench topped with a seersucker-upholstered cushion. Photo by Ball & Albanese

Brooklyn mudroom by Tamara Eaton

Tamara Eaton added whimsy to this Brooklyn townhouse mudroom with bright colors, contemporary art and assorted coat hooks. Photo by Francis Dzikowski

Sun Valley mudroom by Suzanne Rheinstein

In a Ketchum, Idaho, mountain retreat designed by Suzanne Rheinstein & Associates to be warm and inviting all year long, the storage area fits everything from hats to boots. Photo by Pieter Estersohn

A Greenwich, Connecticut, family home by Marcia Tucker features floor-to-ceiling cabinetry and a bench with hidden storage. Photo by Karissa Van Tassel

Hudson Valley mudroom by GP Schafer Architect

G.P. Schafer partnered with Miles Redd in creating the interiors of his Hudson Valley, New York, country home, which has 150-year-old reclaimed-wood flooring and a cozy niche for putting on shoes. Photo by John M. Hall

Studio Hus founder Tatum Kendrick’s Los Angeles bungalow includes a Chinese Art Deco rug and a pair of vintage wicker chairs that, Kendrick says, “feel very French nineteen fifties.” The leather-upholstered shelf, made by a friend, is “where all the junk collects,” she quips. Kendrick loves how the space mimics a New England mudroom: “Coming from Maine, it kind of feels like home.” Photo by Shade Degges

A sleek mid-century modern bench graces this space in a 1960s London home for which Sigmar created a “Scandinavian modernism meets industrial French” decor. Photo by Christoffer Rudquist

mudroom by Burnham Design

Burnham Design outfitted this Pasadena, California, mudroom with sturdy materials like a tile floor and indoor-outdoor carpeting on the stairs. Photo by Christopher Patey

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