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Warhol Electric Chair

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Andy Warhol skateboard deck (Warhol Electric Chair Skate Deck new)
By (after) Andy Warhol
Located in NEW YORK, NY
Rare Out of Print Andy Warhol Electric Chair Skate Deck: New/sealed in its original packaging. This work originated circa 2010 as a result of the collaboration between Alien Worksho...
Category

1970s Pop Art Prints and Multiples

Materials

Wood, Screen

Andy Warhol, Electric Chair, 1971, Silkscreen
By Andy Warhol
Located in London, GB
Screenprint in colours, 1971, on Velin Arches paper, signed and dated verso in ball point pen, numbered from the edition of 250, printed by Silkprint Kettner, Zurich, published by Bi...
Category

1970s Pop Art Figurative Prints

Materials

Screen

ELECTRIC CHAIR (F. & S. 75)
By Andy Warhol
Located in New York, NY
ANDY WARHOL – ELECTRIC CHAIR (F. & S. 75) 89.5 x 121.5 cm 35 1/4 x 47 7/8 in Screenprint in colours, on wove paper, printed to edges of sheet (with minor trimming) 1971
Category

Late 20th Century Prints and Multiples

Materials

Screen

Electric Chairs
By Andy Warhol
Located in Palm Desert, CA
A set of screen prints by Andy Warhol. "Electric Chairs" is a full set of screen prints, executed in bright and lush colors and neons of pink, yellow, turquoise, orange, violet, blue...
Category

1970s Pop Art Figurative Prints

Materials

Screen

  • Electric Chairs
  • Electric Chairs
  • Electric Chairs
  • Electric Chairs
H 35.375 in. W 47.875 in.
Electric Chair (FS II.81)
By Andy Warhol
Located in West Hollywood, CA
Andy Warhol created Electric Chair 81 for his Death and Disaster series. This print is unique in the portfolio because Warhol uses more than just two colors. The image of the electri...
Category

Late 20th Century Pop Art Still-life Prints

Materials

Screen

Electric Chairs (FS II.82)
By Andy Warhol
Located in West Hollywood, CA
Electric Chairs (FS II.82) In 1971, Warhol released his “Electric Chairs” portfolio, which featured ten unique screenprints. This particular print is one of the ten, and it has a pi...
Category

Late 20th Century Pop Art Prints and Multiples

Materials

Screen

Electric Chair (FS II.76)
By Andy Warhol
Located in West Hollywood, CA
Warhol created different screenprints of the electric chair as part of his Death and Disaster series, released in the early 1970’s. The series created much controversy, as it focused...
Category

1970s Pop Art More Prints

Materials

Screen

Orange Disaster #5 - 15 Orange Electric Chairs
By Andy Warhol
Located in New York, NY
Hand-signed "Andy Warhol" in permanent black marker Custom gold frame dimensions: 26" high x 24.5" wide "Warhol was preoccupied with news reports of violent death—suicides, car cras...
Category

1970s Pop Art Interior Prints

Materials

Lithograph

Denied Andy Warhol Mint Green Electric Chair Silkscreen Painting by Charles Lutz
By Charles Lutz
Located in Brooklyn, NY
Denied Warhol Mint Green Electric Chair Silkscreen and acrylic on linen with Denied stamp of the Andy Warhol Art Authentication Board. 22 x 28". 2008 Lutz's 2007 ''Warhol Denied'' ...
Category

21st Century and Contemporary Contemporary Paintings

Materials

Linen, Acrylic

Electric Chair
By Andy Warhol
Located in New York, NY
Screenprint. 35 1/2 x 48”. Edition 250.
Category

1970s Prints and Multiples

Materials

Screen

ELECTRIC CHAIR (Retrospective Series)
By Andy Warhol
Located in Miami Beach, FL
Warhol Estate Stamp# UP 47.29 Unique Work Double Sided Screenprint of soft white wove paper
Category

1960s Pop Art Prints and Multiples

Materials

Screen

ELECTRIC CHAIR
By Andy Warhol
Located in New York, NY
ANDY WARHOL – ELECTRIC CHAIR 90.2 × 121.9 cm 35 1/2 × 48 in Color screenprint on wove paper Edition of 250 1971
Category

Late 20th Century Prints and Multiples

Materials

Screen

Electric Chairs, 1971 FS II.77
By Andy Warhol
Located in Oakland Hills, CA
Andy Warhol Electric Chairs, 1971 FS II.77 is a bright blue and neon yellow portrait of New York's Sing Sing Penitentiary's electric chair, known as "Old Sparky." The bright and inte...
Category

1970s Pop Art Still-life Prints

Materials

Screen

Electric Chair
By Andy Warhol
Located in Greenwich, CT
Edition: 250, 50 AP / signed and dated, Printer: Silkprint Kettner, Zurich Switzerland Publisher: Bruno Bischofberger, Zurich Switzerland
Category

1970s Prints and Multiples

Materials

Screen

Electric Chairs (#11.75)
By Andy Warhol
Located in Los Angeles, CA
Edition 250 with 50 AP. Signed and Dated. Stamped on verso. Based on a press service photograph (Wide World Photo, January 13, 1953) of the electric chair in the death chamber at Si...
Category

1970s Pop Art Still-life Prints

Materials

Screen

Electric Chairs (#11.80)
By Andy Warhol
Located in Los Angeles, CA
Edition 250 with 50 AP. Signed and Dated. Stamped on verso. Based on a press service photograph (Wide World Photo, January 13, 1953) of the electric chair in the death chamber at Si...
Category

1970s Pop Art Still-life Prints

Materials

Screen

ELECTRIC CHAIR FS II.76
By Andy Warhol
Located in Aventura, FL
Screenprint on Velin Arches paper. Hand signed and dated by the artist and stamp numbered on verso. From the edition of 250 (there were also 50 artist's proofs in Roman numerals). ...
Category

1970s Pop Art Interior Prints

Materials

Paper, Screen

Electric Chair (Feldman & Schellmann II.83)
By Andy Warhol
Located in Fairfield, CT
Artist: Andy Warhol (1928-1987) Title: Electric Chair (Feldman & Schellmann II.83) Year: 1971 Edition: 250, 50 AP Medium: Screenprint on Arches paper Size: 35.5 x 48 inches Condition...
Category

1970s Pop Art Figurative Prints

Materials

Screen

Electric Chair
By Andy Warhol
Located in New York, NY
Electric Chair FS II. 80
By Andy Warhol
Located in Miami, FL
From the Edition of 250 This piece is signed and dated on recto in ball point pen and rubber stamp numbered.
Category

20th Century Pop Art Prints and Multiples

Materials

Screen

Electric Chairs II.83
By Andy Warhol
Located in Boston, MA
Title: Electric Chairs II.83 Series: Electric Chairs Date: 1971 Medium: Screenprint Unframed Dimensions: 35.5" x 48" Framed Dimensions: 39.5" x 51.75" x 2.25" Signature: Signe...
Materials

Screen

Electric Chairs (#11.76)
By Andy Warhol
Located in Los Angeles, CA
Edition 250 with 50 AP. Signed and Dated. Stamped on verso. Based on a press service photograph (Wide World Photo, January 13, 1953) of the electric chair in the death chamber at Sin...
Category

1970s Pop Art Still-life Prints

Materials

Screen

Warhol Electric Chair For Sale on 1stDibs

Surely you’ll find the exact warhol electric chair you’re seeking on 1stDibs — we’ve got a vast assortment for sale. In our selection of items, you can find Pop Art examples as well as a Contemporary version. You’re likely to find the perfect warhol electric chair among the distinctive items we have available, which includes versions made as long ago as the 20th Century as well as those made as recently as the 21st Century. On 1stDibs, the right warhol electric chair is waiting for you and the choices span a range of colors that includes orange, black, gray and red. A warhol electric chair from Andy Warhol, Charles Lutz and (after) Andy Warhol — each of whom created distinctive versions of this kind of work — is worth considering. Frequently made by artists working in screen print, acrylic paint and fabric, these artworks are unique and have attracted attention over the years. A large warhol electric chair can be an attractive addition to some spaces, while smaller examples are available — approximately spanning 6 high and 4 wide — and may be better suited to a more modest living area.

How Much is a Warhol Electric Chair?

The average selling price for a warhol electric chair we offer is $25,000, while they’re typically $284 on the low end and $550,000 for the highest priced.

Andy Warhol Biography and Important Works

The name of American artist Andy Warhol is all but synonymous with Pop art, the movement he helped shape in the 1960s. He is known for his clever appropriation of motifs and images from popular advertising and commercials, which he integrated into graphic, vibrant works that utilized mass-production technologies such as printmaking, photography and silkscreening. Later in his career, Warhol expanded his oeuvre to include other forms of media, founding Interview magazine and producing fashion shoots and films on-site at the Factory, his world-famous studio in New York.

Born and educated in in Pittsburgh, Warhol moved to New York City in 1949 and built a successful career as a commercial illustrator. Although he made whimsical drawings as a hobby during these years, his career as a fine artist began in the mid-1950s with ink-blot drawings and hand-drawn silkscreens. The 1955 lithograph You Can Lead a Shoe to Water illustrates how he incorporated in his artwork advertising styles and techniques, in this case shoe commercials.

As a child, Warhol was often sick and spent much of his time in bed, where he would make sketches and put together collections of movie-star photographs. He described this period as formative in terms of his skills and interests. Indeed, Warhol remained obsessed with celebrities throughout his career, often producing series devoted to a famous face or an object from the popular culture, such as Chairman Mao or Campbell’s tomato soup. The 1967 silkscreen Marilyn 25 embodies his love of bright color and famous subjects.

Warhol was a prominent cultural figure in New York during the 1960s, ’70s and ’80s. The Factory was a gathering place for the era’s celebrities, writers, drag queens and fellow artists, and collaboration was common. To this day, Warhol remains one of the most important artists of the 20th century and continues to exert influence on contemporary creators.

Find a collection of original Andy Warhol art on 1stDibs.

Finding the Right Prints and Multiples for You

Decorating with fine-art prints — whether they’re figurative prints, abstract prints or another variety — has always been a practical way of bringing a space to life as well as bringing works by an artist you love into your home.

Pursued in the 1960s and ’70s, largely by Pop artists drawn to its associations with mass production, advertising, packaging and seriality, as well as those challenging the primacy of the Abstract Expressionist brushstroke, printmaking was embraced in the 1980s by painters and conceptual artists ranging from David Salle and Elizabeth Murray to Adrian Piper and Sherrie Levine.

Printmaking is the transfer of an image from one surface to another. An artist takes a material like stone, metal, wood or wax, carves, incises, draws or otherwise marks it with an image, inks or paints it and then transfers the image to a piece of paper or other material.

Fine-art prints are frequently confused with their more commercial counterparts. After all, our closest connection to the printed image is through mass-produced newspapers, magazines and books, and many people don’t realize that even though prints are editions, they start with an original image created by an artist with the intent of reproducing it in a small batch. Fine-art prints are created in strictly limited editions — 20 or 30 or maybe 50 — and are always based on an image created specifically to be made into an edition.

Many people think of revered Dutch artist Rembrandt as a painter but may not know that he was a printmaker as well. His prints have been preserved in time along with the work of other celebrated printmakers such as Pablo Picasso, Salvador Dalí and Andy Warhol. These fine-art prints are still highly sought after by collectors.

“It’s another tool in the artist’s toolbox, just like painting or sculpture or anything else that an artist uses in the service of mark making or expressing him- or herself,” says International Fine Print Dealers Association (IFPDA) vice president Betsy Senior, of New York’s Betsy Senior Fine Art, Inc.

Because artist’s editions tend to be more affordable and available than his or her unique works, they’re more accessible and can be a great opportunity to bring a variety of colors, textures and shapes into a space.

For tight corners, select small fine-art prints as opposed to the oversized bold piece you’ll hang as a focal point in the dining area. But be careful not to choose something that is too big for your space. And feel free to lean into it if need be — not every work needs picture-hanging hooks. Leaning a larger fine-art print against the wall behind a bookcase can add a stylish installation-type dynamic to your living room. (Read more about how to arrange wall art here.)

Find the fine-art prints you’re looking for on 1stDibs today.