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Akos Biro
Portrait of a French Woman Oil Painting Hungarian Master A. Biro French Beauty

About the Item

Canvas measures 25" X 19" inches without the frame. Born in Nagykaroly, Hungary in 1911 (Transylvania, in 1919 it became Carei, Romania). His parents came from the gentry and traded in textiles.Akos Biro is very much thought of as a French painter, due to the fact that he lived and worked in France for most of his professional life. He originally trained at the school of fine art in Budapest from 1931 onwards. In 1933 he was admitted to the Hungarian College in Rome. He moved to France in 1935 and kept studios in Montparnasse and Montmartre He took part time jobs and supplemented his income by doing sketches on the terraces of La Rotonde, Le Dome and La Couple, the famous artist-cafes of Paris. He lived in Paris until 1939. The war brought him back to Hungary, and he did not return to Paris until 1947. He discovered Provence and the sunny South of France in the early 1950s, and seduced by the light and colors he eventually moved permanently to Mougins in the 1970s. He died in Mougins in the South of France in 2002. He studied at the Budapest Academy of Arts and Rome Art School. Amongst his many exhibitions throughout France, he had several solo exhibitions in Central Europe, Amsterdam, Stockholm, Montreal, New York, Cannes, Paris. He was of the period of French artists that included Alain Bonnefoit, Yves Brayer, Jean Jansem, Pierre Marie Brisson, Andre Brasilier, Rene Genis, Andre Verdet. Akos Biro was an important European Expressionist and Surrealist artist who was friends with Jean Cocteau. His later work bears a more visible influence of Surrealism. He also had a period where he worked in a Fauvist Naive style, heavily influenced by Hungarian Folk Art. At various times he signed “Biro Akos” in the Hungarian style where they put the surname first. In France he signed “Akos Biro,” then “A. Biro” then “Akos”
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