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Robert Andrew Parker
Destroyer, American Modern Watercolor Painting by Robert Parker 1964

1964

About the Item

Executed in an American Modern style reminiscent of Lyonel Feininger, this Robert Andrew Parker watercolor painting depicts a warship at sea. The work is signed and dated lower left. The artwork measures 13 x 30 inches.
  • Creator:
    Robert Andrew Parker (1927, American)
  • Creation Year:
    1964
  • Dimensions:
    Height: 20 in (50.8 cm)Width: 37 in (93.98 cm)
  • Medium:
  • Movement & Style:
  • Period:
  • Condition:
    In good condition apart from some time-staining and edge tears.
  • Gallery Location:
    Long Island City, NY
  • Reference Number:
    1stDibs: LU46610542622
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