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Julian Alden Weir
"River Landscape" Julian Alden Weir, American Impressionist, Connecticut Scene

About the Item

Julian Alden Weir River Landscape Signed lower left Watercolor on paper 9 x 11 1/2 inches Provenance: Kraushaar Galleries, New York Sotheby's Parke Bernet, New York, 1965, Lot 27 E. M. Miller, Columbus, Ohio Geoffrey Fleming, Huntington, West Virginia (with) Cincinnati Art Galleries, Ohio Exhibited: Ohio, Columbus Gallery of Fine Arts. Julian Alden Weir was born at West Point, New York, the son of Robert Weir, the longtime drawing master at the military academy. The elder Weir taught his son and also had been Whistler's first teacher. Alden later studied at the National Academy of Design in New York and in Paris worked at the École des Beaux-Arts with Jean-Léon Gérôme. From the outset he was set on a course of academic conservatism. While in France he was close to the plein air genre painter Jules Bastien-Lepage, who was often regarded as being beyond the prevailing academicism. Weir's initial response to the emergent impressionism was one of disbelief. "I never in my life saw more horrible things. They do not observe drawing nor form but give you an impression of what they call nature. It was worse than the Chamber of Horrors," he wrote. Gradually, however, he was brought around, mainly through the influence of his friends John Twachtman and Theodore Robinson. Together they explored the techniques of Japanese prints, carefully assessing the aesthetic function of flat patterning, cropping asymmetry, oblique angles, muted tonalities, and high horizons. Weir had purchased a large farm property in Branchville, Connecticut, and like Twachtman employed its topographical resources for his landscape studies. In 1897, with Twachtman and Hassam, he formed the group of Ten American Painters and exhibited with them for two decades. He was also a close friend and admirer of that solitary genius Albert Pinkham Ryder, caring for him in his illness and attending to the details of his hospitalization and funeral. As Weir slowly moved toward impressionism, he painted attractive if somewhat idealized pictures of the factories at nearby Willimantic and, perhaps most dramatically, the Red Bridge that spanned the Connecticut River. As art historian William Gerdts writes, "the high horizon, the assertive geometry of the composition and especially its dominant diagonals suggest its derivation from Japanese art!" In the last decade of his life, although he had been an avid proponent of modernism, his own work came full circle, returning to a stodgy academicism.
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