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George Hedley
Portrait of a Gentleman or Architect

circa 19th century

About the Item

A finely detailed portrait of a gentleman or architect with building plans or maps in his hand. Oil on canvas, inscribed on verso stretcher "G. Hedley Artist 1852 April," (possibly English 19th century artist George Hedley) and framed in a period giltwood and gessoed frame, with some losses and touchups. Wax relined. Dimensions: 29 ½” H x 25” W, actual; 38.38 in H x 32.5 in W, framed. Ref: 824
  • Creator:
    George Hedley (English)
  • Creation Year:
    circa 19th century
  • Dimensions:
    Height: 38.38 in (97.49 cm)Width: 32.5 in (82.55 cm)Depth: 3 in (7.62 cm)
  • Medium:
  • Movement & Style:
  • Period:
  • Condition:
    Very good overall condition, relined with wax. Some losses and touchups to the gilt gessoed period frame. Please contact us directly for a full condition report before purchasing.
  • Gallery Location:
    Milford, NH
  • Reference Number:
    Seller: 81311stDibs: LU93138242522
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