Skip to main content
Want more images or videos?
Request additional images or videos from the seller
1 of 15

Portrait of a Lady in a Landscape - British 19thC Old Master art oil painting

Circa 1820

About the Item

This superb British Old Master portrait oil painting is attributed to circle of Henry Harlow. Painted circa 1820 it is a half length standing portrait of a young lady in a landscape with a setting sun in the distance. She has dark, shining curly hair held back with a hairband and is wearing a white dress with blue sash. There is a lovely soft focus to her face and the brushwork in both the portrait and background are superb. This is a charming Old Master portrait and would grace any wall. Provenance: London estate. Condition. Oil on canvas, 30 inches by 24 inches and in good condition. Frame. Housed in an ornate gilt frame, 37 inches by 31 inches and in good condition. George Henry Harlow (1787 - 1819) was born in London, the son of a merchant based in China, who died four months before the birth of his only son. From a young age Harlow was apprenticed to Flemish painter Hendrik Frans de Cort. At 15 he became apprenticed to Thomas Lawrence, but stayed for only a year. He is reputed to have been vain and to have worn extreme fashions and walked with a deliberate swagger, earning him the nickname Clarissa Harlowe. He exhibited at the Royal Academy from 1806. In 1819, he returned from a trip to Italy complaining of a sore throat and he died at his home in Soho, aged just 31.
  • Creation Year:
    Circa 1820
  • Dimensions:
    Height: 37 in (93.98 cm)Width: 31 in (78.74 cm)Depth: 2 in (5.08 cm)
  • Medium:
  • Movement & Style:
  • Circle Of:
    George Henry Harlow (1787 - 1819, British)
  • Period:
  • Condition:
  • Gallery Location:
    London, GB
  • Reference Number:
    1stDibs: LU853113810582
More From This SellerView All
  • Portrait of a Boy with Bird - British 17th century art Old Master oil painting
    Located in London, GB
    This stunning 17th century Old Master portrait oil painting is attributed to Godfrey Kneller. Painted circa 1680 it is a superb full length portrait of a blonde haired boy holding a struggling bird. He is bare foot and dressed in a white shirt with gold shawl around him. In the background is a blue drape. There is lovely detail and brushwork in his facial features and vibrant colouring. This a superb 17th century Old Master oil painting housed in a lovely frame. Provenance. Two ascribed labels verso Christie's stamp verso. . Condition. Oil on canvas in good condition, 36 inches by 28 inches approx. Frame. Housed in an ornate frame, 43 inches by 35 inches approx. Sir Godfrey Kneller, 1st Baronet (born Gottfried Kniller; 8 August 1646 – 19 October 1723), was the leading portrait painter in England during the late 17th and early 18th centuries, and was court painter to English and British monarchs from Charles II to George I. Kneller was born Gottfried Kniller in the Free City of Lübeck, the son of Zacharias Kniller, a portrait painter. Kneller studied in Leiden, but became a pupil of Ferdinand Bol and Rembrandt Harmenszoon van Rijn in Amsterdam. He then travelled with his brother John Zacharias Kneller, who was an ornamental painter, to Rome and Venice in the early 1670s, painting historical subjects and portraits in the studio of Carlo Maratti, and later moved to Hamburg. The brothers came to England in 1676, and won the patronage of the Duke of Monmouth. He was introduced to, and painted a portrait of, Charles II. In England, Kneller concentrated almost entirely on portraiture. In the spirit of enterprise, he founded a studio which churned out portraits on an almost industrial scale, relying on a brief sketch of the face with details added to a formulaic model, aided by the fashion for gentlemen to wear full wigs. His portraits set a pattern that was followed until William Hogarth and Joshua Reynolds. Nevertheless, he established himself as a leading portrait artist in England. When Sir Peter Lely died in 1680, Kneller was appointed Principal Painter in Ordinary to the Crown by Charles II. For about 20 years (c.1682-1702) he lived at No. 16-17 The Great Piazza, Covent Garden. In the 1690s, Kneller painted the Hampton Court Beauties depicting the most glamorous ladies-in-waiting of the Royal Court for which he received his knighthood from William III. He produced a series of "Kit-cat" portraits of 48 leading politicians and men of letters, members of the Kit-Cat Club. Created a baronet by King George I on 24 May 1715, he was also head of the Kneller Academy of Painting and Drawing 1711–1716 in Great Queen Street, London, which counted such artists as Thomas Gibson amongst its founding directors. His paintings were praised by Whig members including John Dryden, Joseph Addison, Richard Steele, and Alexander Pope. On the landing in Horsham Museum hang works of art from the Museum's extensive painting collection, featuring a large 18th-century portrait of Charles Eversfield and his wife, of Denne Park House. In the painting Eversfield is giving his wife some violets which signifies fidelity, love and honesty. It is likely that the picture was cut down at some time as it was unusual to stop just below the knee. It may have been painted by more than one person: someone who specialised in clothing, another in drapes, and so on, with perhaps Kneller painting the heads, for it was the portraits that gave the sitters their identity, everything else is rather formulaic. He married a widow, Susanna Grave, on 23 January 1704 at St Bride...
    Category

    1680s Old Masters Portrait Paintings

    Materials

    Oil

  • Portrait of a Young Gentleman - Dutch Old Master 17thC art portrait oil painting
    Located in London, GB
    This superb Dutch Old Master portrait oil painting is attributed as by a follower of Dutch 17th century artist Gerrard van Honthorst. The original of this painting hangs in Wilton Ho...
    Category

    1650s Old Masters Portrait Paintings

    Materials

    Oil

  • Portrait of a Lady with White Gloves - British 18thC art Old Master oil painting
    By Thomas Hudson
    Located in London, GB
    This charming British 18th century Old Master portrait oil painting is attributed to noted portrait artist Thomas Hudson. Hudson was most prolific between 1740 and 1760 and, from 174...
    Category

    18th Century Old Masters Portrait Paintings

    Materials

    Oil

  • Lady Eleanor Dundas - Old Master 18C Scottish art oil painting female portrait
    By Henry Raeburn (circle)
    Located in London, GB
    A fine large and stunning Scottish Old Master portrait oil painting on canvas portrait in good condition which depicts Lady Eleanor Dundas in a white dress set against an open landsc...
    Category

    19th Century Old Masters Portrait Paintings

    Materials

    Oil

  • Portrait of a Boy with Bird - British 17thC Old Master art oil painting
    By Sir Godfrey Kneller
    Located in London, GB
    This stunning 17th century Old Master portrait oil painting is attributed to Godfrey Kneller. Painted circa 1680 it is a superb full length portrait of a blo...
    Category

    1680s Old Masters Portrait Paintings

    Materials

    Oil

  • Portrait of William Stonestreet - Dutch Golden Age 17thC art oil painting
    Located in London, GB
    This superb Dutch Golden Age portrait is attributed to circle of Dutch artist Wybrand Simonsz de Geest. Painted in 1666 it is a full length portrait of a young William Stonestreet. H...
    Category

    1660s Old Masters Portrait Paintings

    Materials

    Oil

You May Also Like
  • COUNTRY GIRL- W.A.Bouguereau- Italian Portarit of young peasant Oil on canvas
    By Pietro Colonna
    Located in Napoli, IT
    Country girl - Pietro Colonna Italia 2006 - Oil on canvas cm. 45x25 Gold gilded wooden frame available on request The painting by Pietro Colonna is a free interpretation of the paint...
    Category

    Early 2000s Old Masters Portrait Paintings

    Materials

    Oil, Canvas

  • Portrait of Sir Edward Littleton, First Baron Lyttleton, Old Masters Oil
    By (After) Anthony Van Dyck
    Located in London, GB
    After Sir Anthony van Dyck (1599-1641) Portrait of Sir Edward Lord Littleton, First Baron Lyttleton (1589-1645) Oil on canvas Image size: 96 by 76 cm Hand carved auricular frame Sir Edward Littleton was Solicitor-General to Charles I, 1634-40; Chief Justice of Common Pleas, January 1640-January 1641; Lord Keeper, 1641-45. Painted in his robes, and wearing the chain of office...
    Category

    17th Century Old Masters Portrait Paintings

    Materials

    Oil, Canvas

  • Portrait of William Herbert, 3rd Earl of Pembroke, Early 17th Century Portrait
    Located in London, GB
    English School, (circa 1600) Portrait of William Herbert, 3rd Earl of Pembroke Oil on panel, oval Image size: 29¼ x 23⅞ inches Painted wooden frame Provenance: 176, Collection of Francis Greville, 1st Earl of Warwick. The Trustees of the Lord Brooks’ Settlement, (removed from Warwick Castle). Sotheby’s, London, 22nd March 1968, lot 81. Painted onto wooden panel, this portrait shows a dark haired gentleman in profile sporting an open white shirt. On top of this garments is a richly detailed black cloak, decorated with gold thread and lined with a sumptuous crimson lining. With the red silk inside it’s all very expensive and would fall under sumptuary laws – so this is a nobleman of high degree. It’s melancholic air conforms to the contemporary popularity of this very human condition, evident in fashionable poetry and music of the period. In comparison to our own modern prejudices, melancholy was associated with creativity in this period. This portrait appeared in the earliest described list of pictures of Warwick castle dating to 1762. Compiled by collector and antiquary Sir William Musgrave ‘taken from the information of Lord & Lady Warwick’ (Add. MSS, 5726 fol. 3) is described; ‘8. Earl of Essex – an original by Zuccharo – seen in profile with black hair. Holding a black robe across his breast with his right hand.’ As tempting as it is to imagine that this is a portrait of Robert Devereux, the 2nd Earl Essex, we might take this with a pinch of salt. Its identification with this romantic and fatal Elizabethan might well have been an attempt to add romance to Warwick Castle’s walls. It doesn’t correspond all that well with Essex’s portraits around 1600 after his return from Cadiz. Notably, this picture was presumably hung not too far away from the castle’s two portraits of Queen Elizabeth I. The first, and undoubtedly the best, being the exquisite coronation portrait that was sold by Lord Brooke in the late 1970s and now hangs in the National Portrait Gallery. The second, described as being ‘a copy from the original at Ld Hydes’, has yet to resurface. The portrait eventually ended up being hung in the State Bedroom of Warwick Castle. Archival documents present one other interesting candidate. The Greville family’s earliest inventory of paintings, made in 1630 at their home Brooke House in Holborn, London, describes five portraits of identified figures. All five belonged to the courtier, politician and poet Sir Fulke Greville (1554-1628), 1st Baron Brooke, and were hung in the ‘Gallerie’ of Brooke House behind yellow curtains. One of them was described as being of ‘Lord of Pembrooke’, which is likely to have been William Herbert (1580-1630), 3rd Earl of Pembroke. William was the eldest son of Greville’s best friend’s sister Mary Sidney, and was brought up in the particularly literary and poetically orientated household which his mother had supported. Notably, the 3rd Earl was one of the figures that Shakespeare’s first folio was dedicated to in 1623. The melancholic air to the portrait corresponds to William’s own pretensions as a learned and poetic figure. The richness of the robe in the painting, sporting golden thread and a spotted black fabric, is indicative of wealth beyond that of a simple poet or actor. The portrait’s dating to around the year 1600 might have coincided with William’s father death and his own rise to the Pembroke Earldom. This period of his life too was imbued with personal sadness, as an illicit affair with a Mary Fitton had resulted in a pregnancy and eventual banishment by Elizabeth I to Wilton after a short spell in Fleet Prison. His illegitimate son died shortly after being born. Despite being a close follower of the Earl of Essex, William had side-stepped supporting Devereux in the fatal uprising against the Queen and eventually regained favour at the court of the next monarch James I. His linen shirt is edged with a delicate border of lace and his black cloak is lined on the inside with sumptuous scarlet and richly decorated on the outside with gold braid and a pattern of embroidered black spots. Despite the richness of his clothes, William Herbert has been presented in a dishevelled state of semi-undress, his shirt unlaced far down his chest with the ties lying limply over his hand, indicating that he is in a state of distracted detachment. It has been suggested that the fashion for melancholy was rooted in an increase in self-consciousness and introspective reflection during the late 16th and early 17th centuries. In contemporary literature melancholy was said to be caused by a plenitude of the melancholy humor, one of the four vital humors, which were thought to regulate the functions of the body. An abundance of the melancholia humor was associated with a heightened creativity and intellectual ability and hence melancholy was linked to the notion of genius, as reflected in the work of the Oxford scholar Robert Burton, who in his work ‘The Anatomy of Melancholy’, described the Malcontent as ‘of all others [the]… most witty, [who] causeth many times divine ravishment, and a kind of enthusiamus… which stirreth them up to be excellent Philosophers, Poets and Prophets.’ (R. Burton, The Anatomy of Melancholy, London, 1621 in R. Strong, ‘Elizabethan Malady: Melancholy in Elizabethan and Jacobean Portraits’, Apollo, LXXIX, 1964). Melancholy was viewed as a highly fashionable affliction under Elizabeth I, and her successor James I, and a dejected demeanour was adopted by wealthy young men, often presenting themselves as scholars or despondent lovers, as reflected in the portraiture and literature from this period. Although the sitter in this portrait is, as yet, unidentified, it seems probable that he was a nobleman with literary or artistic ambitions, following in the same vain as such famous figures as the aristocratic poet and dramatist, Edward de Vere...
    Category

    Early 17th Century Old Masters Portrait Paintings

    Materials

    Wood Panel, Oil

  • CHERUBIM WITH FLOWERS- Italian School - Italian Figurative Oil painting
    By Giulio Di Sotto
    Located in Napoli, IT
    Cherubim with flowers - Oil on canvas cm.80x100 by Giulio Di Sotto, Italy, 2002. Gold leaf gilded wooden frame available on request This wonderful oil on canvas represents two putti...
    Category

    Early 2000s Old Masters Portrait Paintings

    Materials

    Oil, Canvas

  • Rare and fascinating 17th Century German Classical British royalty Old Master
    By (Circle of) Godfrey Kneller
    Located in Petworth, West Sussex
    Circle of Godfrey Kneller (German, 1646 – 1723) Amelie Sophia von Wendt as Aphrodite in the judgement of Paris, later as King George II’s Courtesan, bestowed the title of the Countes...
    Category

    17th Century Old Masters Portrait Paintings

    Materials

    Oil, Canvas

  • Attributed to Cornelius de Neve, Portrait of John, Lord Belasyse
    Located in London, GB
    Attributed to Cornelius de Neve (circa 1612-1678) Portrait of John, Lord Belasyse (1614-1689) Oil on canvas; held in a period style carved polished wood frame. Dimensions refer to framed size. Cornelius de Neve, was born in Antwerp, possibly training under the Dutchman Mierveldt and settling in London by 1627. It has been suggested he possibly associated with Van Dyck, though his works show a strong debt to painting in England prior to his arrival, particularly John de Critz...
    Category

    Mid-17th Century Old Masters Portrait Paintings

    Materials

    Oil

Recently Viewed

View All