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Studio of Sir Peter Lely
Portrait of a Gentleman, William Seymour, 3rd Duke of Somerset, Oil Painting

circa 1658/60

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  • Portrait of a Lady in a Blue Gown Holding a Sheer Scarf Painting Godfrey Kneller
    By Kneller Godfrey
    Located in London, GB
    Portrait of a Lady in a Blue Gown Holding a Sheer Scarf c.1675-85 Studio of Sir Godfrey Kneller (1646-1723) Titan Fine Art present this captivating portrait by the leading late seve...
    Category

    17th Century Old Masters Portrait Paintings

    Materials

    Canvas, Oil

  • Portrait of a Gentleman in Scarlet Robe Holding Flowers c.1675, Oil on canvas
    Located in London, GB
    Titan Fine Art present this striking portrait, which was painted by one of the most talented artists working in England during the last half of the 17th century, John Greenhill. Gre...
    Category

    17th Century Old Masters Portrait Paintings

    Materials

    Canvas, Oil

  • Portrait of Lady Anne Tipping née Cheke c.1705, English Aristocratic Collection
    By Kneller Godfrey
    Located in London, GB
    Titan Fine Art present this exquisite portrait, that formed part of a historic collection of an English aristocratic family, Lord and Lady Sandys at their magnificent baroque and Regency Grade-I listed family home, Ombersley Court. The house was among the most fascinating survivals of its kind in this country. The atmospheric interiors were distinguished above all for the works of art associated with two key moments in national history and, more specifically, to the roles of Colonel the Hon. John Russell in the Civil War and the reign of King Charles II and of Lord Arthur Hill, later 2nd Baron Sandys, in the Peninsular War. The collection was acquired or commissioned over five centuries and remained at Ombersley Court until its recent sale, the first in 294 years. The full provenance of our painting, which hung in The Saloon (see photo), is known from its creation right through to now – an extraordinary fact considering its age. This exquisite Grand Manner work is an evocative example of the type of portrait in vogue during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Beautifully composed, the sitter has been depicted full length within surroundings that conveyed cultivation and an elite status – a classical porch with a colossal column. The beautiful colour combination of the azure silks of the dress, the mauve curtain and the sumptuous scarlet wrap imbue the portrait with a sense of luxury and emphasise the fact that this lady was a paragon of the wealthy and privileged society that she belonged to, with the means to commission a notable artist. Portrayed without the use of excessive props and jewellery, the artist knew that the sitter’s beauty was more than enough to captivate the audience. The clothing and hairstyle help to date the portrait to circa 1705. For any respectable woman at this time her skin is sheet white which was highly end vogue. A remarkable care is exercised in rendering of the flesh and the treatment of the drapery, with its delicate folds and virtuoso in the art of conveying the texture of the fabrics. The clear fresh palette, bright eyes, and rendering is exquisite. On the lower right of the portrait is an identifying inscription: 'Lady Tipping / Daughter of Coll. Cheek'. Anne Tipping, née Cheke, was the daughter of Colonel Thomas Cheke (1628-1688) and his wife Letitia, née Russell (1649-1722). Her father was appointed Lieutenant of the Tower of London under King Charles II in 1679 and he held that position until 1687 when James II removed him from office. At the age of 22 Lady Tipping married Sir Thomas Tipping, 1st Bt. (1653-1718) with whom she had three children, Catherine, Letitia, and Thomas. Through her father, Anne inherited the manor of Pyrgom in the village of Havering-atte-Bower, Essex. The house had previously belonged to Henry VIII, and it was here that he made the decision to restore the princesses Mary and Elizabeth to the succession to the throne. In 1724, Anne helped to found the Dame Tipping school in Havering-atte-Bower, which was endowed from her death in 1728 by a legacy in her will. Anne was lucky to have independent means, as her husband led a tumultuous life, dying in debt in Southwark prison. Anne died when she was just forty-eight years of age and is buried at Havering. Our sitter’s daughter, Letitia Tipping, married Samuel 1st Lord Sandys in 1725. In 1727, she inherited her family’s heirlooms including the possessions of her great uncle Admiral Russell, Earl of Orford. The 1st Earl of Orford (1653-1727) was one of the Immortal Seven who issued the invitation to William III to take the throne. Commander in Chief of the Royal Navy in the Nine Years War, he defeated the French fleet at Barfleur and La Hogue and is an important historic figure. Once owned by Evesham Abbey, the manor of Ombersley was acquired by the Sandys family in the early 1600s, when Sir Samuel Sandys, the eldest son of Edwin Sandys, Bishop of Worcester and later Archbishop of York, took a lease on the manor, before receiving an outright grant in 1614. The present house, Ombersley Court, dates from the time of Samuel, 1st Lord Sandys, between 1723 and 1730. The house itself is a fine example of an English Georgian country house set in rolling countryside and surrounded by Wellingtonias, planted to commemorate the Battle of Waterloo by Arthur Hill, 2nd Baron Sandys, who played a distinguished part in the battle and was one of the Duke of Wellington’s aides de camp. The Duke also stayed in the house and in the Great Hall, was the Waterloo banner which was brought to the house by Sir Arthur Hill, aide-de-camp to the Duke of Wellington, who succeeded his mother, the Marchioness of Downshire as 2nd Lord Sandys. Further Waterloo memorabilia are kettle drums from battle. The family had a strong tradition of military and political service, dating back to the 17th century, and this was also reflected in the fine collection of portraits and paintings in the house. In short, Ombersley represented a vital aspect of British history. The house and more especially the collection were of the greatest historical importance. Houses that have remained in the possession of the same family for as many as three centuries have become increasingly rare. Through this portrait, collectors have a chance to acquire a piece of British history and an evocative vestige of a glittering way of life, which is now gone. The work has been well preserved and cared for over its circa 325 years of age, only requiring the removal of a discoloured varnish recently – now the fine details and the true colours can be appreciated. The work can now be safely and fully enjoyed by future generations. Presented in a striking ebonised frame with applied carved and pierced gilded foliage, which is a work of art in itself. Sir Godfrey Kneller (1646-1723) dominates our understanding of British portraiture at the turn of the seventeenth century. With Van Dyck, Lely and Reynolds, his name has become synonymous with the visual interpretation of British history – not least because he painted almost every person of prominence in forty years of British public life. This reputation was well-deserved, and although Kneller's age embraced many accomplished painters - John Closterman, for example, Jonathan Richardson the Elder, or Michael Dahl- none came close to Kneller in immediate fame, or in such instant association in the popular mind with the exercise of portraiture. Kneller is remembered for having painted ten ruling sovereigns, including every reigning British monarch from King Charles II to King George I. Provenance By descent to the sitter's daughter, Letitia Tipping (1699-1779), wife of Samuel Sandys, 1st Baron Sandys (1695-1770), and by descent to their son, Edwin Sandys, 2nd Baron Sandys (1726-1797), and by inheritance to his niece, Mary, Marchioness of Downshire and 1st Baroness Sandys (1764-1836), and by descent to her second son, Lieutenant-General Arthur Hill, 2nd Baron Sandys (1792-1860), and by inheritance to his younger brother, Arthur Marcus Sandys, 3rd Baron Sandys (1798-1863), and thence by descent to, Richard Hill...
    Category

    18th Century Old Masters Portrait Paintings

    Materials

    Canvas, Oil

  • Portrait of a Lady, Dorothy Wood in Blue Dress c.1750, Fine Carved Gilded Frame
    Located in London, GB
    This work formed part of an ancient collection of family heirlooms of the Wood family of Bracon Ash, Norfolk. This painting, along with another (also with Titan Fine Art at the time of writing) of our sitter’s sister, descended within the family for around 275 years until recently dispersed; they are exquisite examples of Georgian portraiture in England and represents the best of the artist’s work. They are held in their original carved and gilded frames, which are absolute top quality and condition and magnificent works of art in their own right. By tradition the sitter is Dorothy Wood. She was baptised 2nd June 1726, one of several children of Thomas Wood (1682-176) and Dorothy Huby (1700-1759). Her aunt, Jane Wood (1677-1756), was a Franciscan nun in Bruges. In 1758 her sister, also Jane (1727–1790), whose portrait is also with Titan Fine Art at the time of writing, married Knipe Gobbet (1730/5-1791) who was Sheriff in 1768 (and Mayor in 1771) of the City of Norwich, and later Lieutenant-Colonel of the West Norfolk Regiment, in which corps he had served in for many years. Although the Wood family were Roman Catholics Knipe was a prominent local wine merchant, JP, Alderman, sheriff, mayor and Lieutenant. Roman Catholics may have paid lip service to religious conformity as they were excluded from certain areas of public life before the Catholic Emancipation Act of 1829. Their oldest daughter, Anne (1760-1817) famously married Dr William Compton (1733-1824), the Chancellor of Ely and the next collateral male relation to the Earl of Northampton, in 1799, in a lavish ceremony on board the Foudroyant, off Naples, where the bride was given away by the Right Hon. Lord Nelson himself. The marriage document, signed by Lord Nelson, Lady Emma Hamilton, Captain Thomas Hardy, and others descended within the family, until recently sold, in a sale that raised worldwide interest, for £20,160. It accounts that William Compton received "a great many favours and kindnesses" from Nelson, and most especially "the kind interest" taken in sealing his union with a wife who made him "the happiest of mortals". Anne, the aforesaid spouse, said that the admiral's "good heart" had made her "as happy as I can possibly be on this earth" ... Midshipman Parsons remembered those days nostalgically, noting Emma's "graceful form" bending over her harp to bestow "heavenly music" upon the diners on the quarterdeck and the large-decked galley, flush with opera singers, that glided alongside to serenade the sunset of each day'. Our sitter died unmarried around 1759. John Theodore Heins (1697-1756) was a painter whose work, at his best, shows detail of an exceptionally high quality. His portraits of Anna Maria Kett nee Phillips and her husband Henry Kett, painted in 1741, are exceptional and evidence that he had the ability to portray a likeness on par with some of the best portraitists in England at the time. Heins appears to have originated in Germany but moved to the UK and settled in Norwich around 1720. From 1720 to his death in 1756, Heins built up a fine reputation as a portrait painter and painted many members of prominent Norfolk families right up to his last year. He was commissioned in 1732 to paint a portrait of the Mayor of Norwich, Francis Arnam and also the previous year's Mayor Robert Marsh...
    Category

    18th Century Old Masters Portrait Paintings

    Materials

    Canvas, Oil

  • Portrait of Margaret Broun, Lady Colstoun, Ancient UK Manor House Provenance
    By Sir Godfrey Kneller
    Located in London, GB
    This work, presented by Titan Fine Art, formed part of a collection of family pictures and heirlooms of the ancient Broun (Brown) family at Colstoun House, Scotland’s oldest family home. Colstoun was the seat of the family for over 900 years ever since the first stone was laid, shortly after arriving in Britain during the Norman Conquest. The portrait passed through several generations at Colstoun before it was sold, along with other family heirlooms in 1990. Through this portrait, collectors have a chance to acquire a piece of British history and an evocative vestige of a glittering way of life, which has now vanished; the work is a charming example of portraiture from the period. The sitter was born Margaret Bannatyne, Lady Newhall in 1672. She was the only daughter, and heiress, of James Bannatyne of Newhall (born c.1645). On 10th March 1688 Lady Newhall married Robert Broun, 19th Laird of Colstoun (1667-1703) from the neighbouring estate. The couple had five girls (accounts show that Lady Colstoun took them to be educated in Edinburgh) and two boys. Her husband was the younger son of Sir Patrick Broun, 1st Baronet of Coulston, and by marrying Margaret, an heiress, Laird Robert was able to purchase the ancient Colstoun estates from his brother, Sir George Broun of Colstoun, in 1699 when he was forced to sell them due to gambling debts. This enabled Coulston to be rescued for the family but it meant that the Newhall estates had to be sold. Lady Colstoun was to suffer again when Robert, aged 36 years old, and their two sons, died when returning from the Scottish parliament on 31st May 1703 when their carriage overturned into a river on the Colstoun estate; Lady Colstoun was in the carriage but miraculously survived. The baronetcy passed from Robert’s older brother, Sir George, to a cousin, but the estates devolved to Margaret and her eldest daughter Jean (1688-1751), who married her cousin Charles Broun of Cleghornie, Laird of Cleghornie (born 1674) in 1705. Christian Broun, heiress to Charles Broun, married The 9th Earl of Dalhousie, who among other appointments was governor of Canada 1819-28. Her son was the 10th Earl and only Marquis, and Governor General of India from 1847-56. On 18th July 1706 Margaret married the Reverend Matthew Reid, Minister of the Gospel at North Berwick (born 1668) and the couple had three boys and one girl. Reverend Reid died in 1730 and Margaret three years later, presumably at Colstoun, where she was known to have been living. The most likely date in which the portrait was painted was circa 1699 when the sitter and her husband purchased the Colstoun estate. An inventory of the Colstoun estate at the time shows a marked improvement both in quantity and quality of items at the house, it is clear that money was available and it would have been a fitting time to have a portrait painted. Furthermore the age of the sitter in the portrait, and the style of clothing and hair, correspond with this date. This ancient Clan Broun (or Brown), had close ties to royalty due to their alleged descent from the royal house of France (the clan chief even bears the three golden lilies of France). In 1073, Walterus Le Brun, a prosperous twelfth century baron, travelled from France to Scotland as the leader of a band of warriors to the aid of King Malcolm of Scotland. From Le Brun came Broun and from Broun came the anglicised version, Brown. Documented as the progenitor of the Brouns of Colstoun, he was witness to an instrument of the Inquisition of the possessions of the Church of Glasgow, made by David I, Prince (Earl) of Cumberland, in 1116, in the reign of his brother, King Alexander I of Scotland. Still retained in the family to this day are items such as a Royal Charter issued by King David II – which grants David Broun the land at ‘Segaryston’, by Haddington, in 1358, and a Barony gifted by Mary Queen of Scots two centuries later, ancient documents have been preserved in immaculate condition. Still bearing the wax seals denoting their royal authors, one carrying the seal of King James VI in 1625 retains the detail of the seal on both sides. There is even a letter from Oliver Cromwell from 1648. The collection also includes documentation of the Broun family’s time in India, where Christian Broun lived with her husband George Ramsay, the 9th Earl of Dalhousie, while he served as commander-in-chief. Legend has it that the Colstoun Pear on the estate has a history stretching back to the 13th century when the Brouns were given 'The Pear' by Hugo de Gifford, a wizard by repute. The Brouns have protected this Pear for centuries. Our painting, along with other ancestral portraits and paintings, Indo-European furniture, and heirlooms, 784 lots in total, were sold by Sotheby’s in a two-day sale on 21 and 22 May 1990 in order to raise funds to demolish the Victorian wing of Colstoun House and restore the rest of the mansion to its original sixteenth/seventeenth century appearance. Drawn from the estate of the late Colin Broun-Lindsay, a descendant of Dalhousie, the ''Furniture, Paintings, Watercolours and Prints, Ceramics and Glass, Indian Arms and Armour and Trophies'' were all dispersed. The painting was inspected first-hand by Professor J Douglas...
    Category

    18th Century Old Masters Portrait Paintings

    Materials

    Canvas, Oil

  • Double Portrait of Sir John Rivers 3rd Baronet of Chafford, and Lady Anne Rivers
    Located in London, GB
    This magnificent grand-scale work, offered by Titan Fine Art, formed part of a collection of family pictures and heirlooms of the Rivers Baronets and their descendants for over 325 years, before it was dispersed by the last in the line in 1988. The work was painted by the most technically proficient painter in England after the death of Van Dyck, and the dominant court painter to Charles II and James, Duke of York, Sir Peter Lely. It is no surprise that for years Lely had no serious rivals, was enormously influential and successful, and one of the country’s most important painters – and his work influenced countless artists over generations. The exquisite carved and gilded auricular frame is an astounding work of art in itself. The sitters in this exquisite double portrait are Sir John Rivers, who succeeded as the 3rd Baronet Chafford in 1657 (c.1638 - c. 1679), and his wife, Lady Anne Hewitt (c.1640-c.1689). They are seated in an outdoor setting beside a fountain modelled as a female figure with water issuing into a scallop-shell. The water, the elaborate sculpted fountain with its scallop-edged bowl, and the open shell in her hand are symbols of fertility - as such they make an appropriate allusion to Lady Anne’s potential as wife and mother, recalling Proverbs, chapter 5, verse 18: “Let thye fountain be blessed, and rejoice in the wife of thye youth”. This reference was realised, as Sir John and Lady Anne produced at least six children; their son George (1665-1734) became 4th Baronet of Chafford. The composition, thus, represents a celebration of marriage and was likely commissioned around the time of the betrothal (the marriage took place 26th Feb 1662 or 1663). The statues in the left margin are 'Youth and 'Old Age' and are a typical form of Memento Mori reminding virile young man that even they will lose their youth and grow old. The Rivers family, originally of Kent, traces its history to Sir Bartholomew Rivers, in the reign of Edward IV. The family included several prominent members including several knights, a Commander in the King's Army, a steward of a ducal estate, a Lord-Mayor of London, and an M.P. John Rivers (c.1659-c.1651) was made 1st Baronet of Chafford in 1622 by King James I. The Chafford estate was the family seat and it remained so until the early 1700s with the death of Sir George Rivers, 4th Baronet (1665–1734), whose sons had all died. The Chafford estate was left to his daughters while the baronetcy passed to nephew John Rivers, 5th Baronet (c. 1718–1743), and then Sir John’s brother, Sir Peter Rivers-Gay, 6th Baronet (c. 1721–1790). Upon Sir Peter Rivers Gay's death the estate passed to his eldest son, Sir Thomas Rivers Gay, 7th Baronet (c. 1770–1805). Sir Thomas, dying in 1805 with no children, bequeathed the estate to his mother Dame Martha Rivers Gay, who managed the estate until 1834 when she settled it on the then Sir Henry Rivers, 9th Baronet (c. 1779–1851) her younger son, before dying shortly thereafter in 1835. Sir Henry had married in 1812 to Charlotte Eales, with whom he had 6 sons and 8 daughters. Upon his death in 1851 the estate passed to his eldest surviving son Sir James Francis Rivers, 10th Baronet (1822–1869). Sir James married Catherine Eastcott in 1867 but died childless in 1869, and the estate passed to his only surviving brother Sir Henry Chandos Rivers, 11th Baronet (1834–1870) but he died a year later in 1870 also childless; with no male heir the Baronetcy was therefore extinguished. The estate was bequeathed, in trust, by Sir Henry Chandos Rivers to Thomas Frederick Inman, a solicitor of Bath, who then managed the estate as a trustee on behalf of Sir Henry Chandos Rivers' sister Katherine Rivers (c.1826-1895). It then passed to Katherine River’s daughter, Katherine Wall (born c.1855), who had also inherited Worthy Park House from her father, George Alfred Ellis Wall (1825-1875). Until 1958 our portrait is known to have hung at Worthy Park House. Upon Katherine Wall’s death, the Rivers estate passed to her daughter, Katherine Eleonora Rivers Fryer (1889-1963), who married Colonel James Alexander Butchart 1877-1853. In 1958 the family sold Worthy Park House but our portrait was loaned to Southampton Museum and Art Gallery. After the death of Katherine and Colonel James, the estate was left to their only son, Charles Bruce Rivers Butchart (1917-2005) and upon Charles’ retirement to a nursing home in 1988, and without heirs, our portrait, along with the residual assets of the Rivers estate were sold, thus ending over 325 years of continual family ownership. Lady Anne Rivers is thought to have been born circa 1640. She was the fourth child of the second marriage of Sir Thomas Hewitt (or Hewett) (1606-1662), 1st Baronet of Pishobury, Herts, and his wife Margaret Lytton (died 1689). Sir Thomas was an English landowner and M.P. for Windsor and upon the English Restoration...
    Category

    17th Century Old Masters Portrait Paintings

    Materials

    Canvas, Oil

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