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Juan de Arellano
"Cesta de flores", 17th Century Oil on Canvas, Still Flowers by Juan de Arellano

Circa 1660

About the Item

JUAN DE ARELLANO Spanish, 1614 - 1676 Cesta de Flores signed Juan de Arellano (lower lright) oil on canvas original period carved, gilt and polychrome wood frame 22-1/2 X 27-5/8 inches (57 X 70 cm.) framed: 31-1/4 X 36-3/8 (79 X 92 cm.) PROVENANCE CHRISTIE´S LONDON Private Spanish Collection, Madrid Spanish painter born in 1614 in Madrid (baptized August 3 in the parish of San Torcuato de Santorcaz) and died October 12, 1676 (was buried on 23 December San Felipe el Real). Already in the 17TH century it was one of the most famous Spanish painters, and owed its great artistic prestige and its economic well-being to his singular skill in the representation of baskets, vases and flower garlands. While already Juan Van der Hamen and Juan Fernández el Labrador had painted vases in the twenties and thirties of the 17TH century, is Juan de Arellano (and his artistic production, of which there are signed and dated from the 1940s examples) who should be considered the first (and the better and more effective) specialist in the painting of flowers in Spain. The fact that Arellano maintained during more than 40 years one of the most important and popular bakeries public painting in Madrid, where he/she worked, apart from many currently unknown painters, also his son-in-law Bartolomé Pérez and his son José de Arellano, shows the fame and prestige of those who enjoyed Arellano already in life. It became the most sought-after painter of vases for commissions in the Spain of the 17TH century, and also worked for many churches of Madrid. Antonio Ponz mentions a few children, birds fruits and flowers painted on mirrors for the sacristy of San Jeronimo. Scale optics Antonio Palomino(1724) and his unique artistic talent and his ability to work, but also of its mercantile spirit the Treaty the pictorial Museum bears witness. Palomino told Arellano that "applied to copy some vases of the Mario [Nuzzi]; After studying the natural flowers, he/she did them as above, none of the Spaniards exceeded him in the eminence of this ability; There are several testimonies in the temples and houses of Lords, and fans, and especially in the of the Lord count of Oñate, there are many, and great vases of Arellano; and there are four, which are upper thing, and not in the body of the chapel of our Lady of good counsel was less its study on fruits; and so great was its implementation, who painted both night and day [...]. Whither a day that had been given to the flowers; figures had left, and said: because this I work less and earn more; and thus was true; because it not only earned the pecuniary interests; but much more in the posthumous fame of his eminent ability." He was the son of Juan de Arellano and Ana García, and father of the painters José Manuel, Manuel Jorge and Julián de Arellano. Although little is known of the first artistic formation of Arellano (Palomino relates that his mother gave him as an apprentice of an unknown painter in Alcalá de Henares) if there is evidence of that came in 1633, at the age of ten and nine years as an officer in the workshop of Juan de Solís in Madrid. In 1636 he/she declared to have received an amount of money by having performed with Ribiera Francisco a carriage for the Duke of Las Torres, and in 1639 he/she married María Banela in Madrid parish of Santa Cruz. In October 1643, he/she said having married María Corcuera, when his first wife died in May of this year. Among the at least eleven children born of this marriage between 1648 and 1669 should highlight to Juana (1648) was the wife of the painter of flowers Bartolomé Pérez, and the male José Manuel (1653), Manuel Jorge (1663) and Julian (1669) by having dedicated to painting. Like many of the painters of the 17TH century, Juan de Arellano acted as assessor of collections of painting on several occasions and for a diverse clientele. It priced in 1644 the paintings that were upon the death of the count of Peñaflor; in 1646 the pictures of doctor Alonso of Elm and Valencia; in 1655 Francisco Doria pictures, innkeeper; in 1658 the inheritance left by the painter of still lifes Francisco barrier; In 1663 the pictures of Manuel Chamorro; in 1666 the pictures of Lorenzo Sánchez, merchant of books; in 1669 Alonso Romero of Alises; pictures in 1674 the paintings of Juan Antonio Fornelli, gentleman of the House of Castile; in 1675 the paintings that had been left by the death of Isabel Lozano. His great public workshop would be host to a great number of disciples apprentices and officers, but while there is documentary confirmation that Francisco Hernández became an apprentice in his workshop in 1646, Lucas Santolus in 1648 and Miguel Herrán Jiménez in 1663, is not known yet if Bartolomé Pérez, who came to be his son-in-law and most faithful followerIt was his apprentice. It was in the year 1650 when Juan de Arellano was moved to the main street, opposite San Felipe el Real, where he/she lived the rest of his life and where, among others, born José Manuel, the better, though still little known, of the painters sons of Juan de Arellano. Although important recent research have been able to create a provisional Catalogue Raisonné, considered his works to hundreds of oil paintings, is difficult to establish a rigorous chronology between them, since many of the works (although mostly signed) have no date. The difficulties of attribution and dating will be resolved with the review and verification of the large number of tables that have been attributed to the artist lately and circulating on the market under his name, provided some signatures whose authenticity would be verified. Although Palomino linking Arellano impulse to paint vases with the works of the Italian painter Mario Nuzzi, called Dei Fiori, his first work signed and dated (j. de Arellano Faciebat aetatis suae 32. 1646), wreath with the allegory of vanity (Valencia, private collection), carried out together with Francisco Camilo, who painted the children and the putto, shows the direct knowledge of Flemish painting, represented by the works of Daniel Seghers and Jan Brueghel. Two vases of bronze with birds and fruit, signed and dated (1647; Madrid, private collection) the following year, synthesize Flamenco elements, such as the disposition of the flowers and butterflies, with objects from the Italian art, such as the bronze vases taken from prints of ancient vessels recorded by Querubino Alberti on models of Polidoro of Caravaggio. 1652 date from signed two garlands of flowers with landscape (Madrid, Museo del Prado), prominent Flemish influence and almost insurmountable technical quality. Although other two pairs of garlands can be attributed him with certainty, there are no known signed works theirs until the year 1664, which are painted two (signed vases; Madrid, Naseiro collection), the pair of vases on capitals (signed; Particular, sold in Sotheby´s Amsterdam in 1984 collection) and another signed vase in a particular collection. 1665 are the basket of flowers (signed; Collection especially), the couple of dumps (signed vases; Private collection, sold in 1982 in Sotheby´s London) two (signed vases; Varez Fisa collection) and another signed basket of flowers (private collection). Dated in 1667 and signed are also the vase on vase glass (private collection) and a pair of vases (Madrid, Abello collection). From 1668 are the signed glass vase and Crystal (Madrid, Naseiro collection) (private collection), signed vase fruits and other signed vase in a particular collection of Madrid. Among his most spectacular and representative, works in what wealth of variety of flowers (in addition to butterflies, dragonflies and lizards) and pictorial technique is concerned, mention the two signed baskets with flowers from the Prado Museum and the basket of flowers of the Museo de Bellas Artes de Bilbao, signed and dated 1671. The two versions known from the allegory of the sense of smell (one in the Masaveu collection, and the other in a private collection and also parts of a series of five paintings of the senses), San José and San Cristóbal (both with inscription of its name) of the parish of San Torcuato de Santorcaz, where was named after the artist, the Garland of flowers and fruits supported by putti (signed; Madrid, private collection), the Garland of flowers with bust of the Savior and the Garland of flowers with bust of the Virgin (both signed, Abello collection), and two versions of the Virgin nursing the child (one in Burgos, Cathedral, Chapel of Santa key, and the other in Toledo, Museum of Santa Cruz) can use as examples of its style in religious paintings, although it is still difficult to look at them with absolute certainty works only yours. Among his paintings, priced the 20 October 1676 by Andrés de la Torre and Juan de Fontecha, after the death of Juan de Arellano on 13 October and before distributing them on 6 December of the same year between his three sons, were seventy-seven official portraits of court for official institutions, fourteen paintings of hunting dogsSeventeen paintings of hunting, fifteen representations of actual sites, eleven oil paintings of angels and Kings, four times and a large number of sacred paintings, mostly santos and santas. In addition were priced two sobreventanas of flowers with a few children (unfinished), a canvas with a vase of flowers, our Lady of milk with a Garland of flowers, ten paintings of different fruits, another wreath of flowers (unfinished), a vase of flowers, four trays of different flowers, another vase (unfinished) and two garlands. Thirteen books of prints, which surely had served as models also to their vases were also found among its assets at the time of his death. Bibliography AA.VV. Bank of Spain: collection of painting. Madrid, 1985. AA.VV.Three centuries of painting, Caylus, 1995. AGULLÓ and COBO, M. news on Madrid painters of the 16th - 18th. Granada, Universidad de Granada, 1978 -: More news on Madrid painters of the 16th to 18th centuries. Madrid, 1981. -: Documents for the history of Spanish painting, I. Madrid, 1994. AGULLÓ and COBO, M. and BARATECH, M. T. documents for the history of Spanish painting, II. Madrid, 1996. ANGULO ÍÑIGUEZ, D. Pintura from the 17TH century (Ars Hispaniae, Vol. XV). Madrid, 1971. ANTONIO, T. and ORIHUELA, M. (Commissioners). The beauty of the real (exhibition catalogue...). Madrid, Museo del Prado, 1995. NEIGHBORHOOD MOYA, j. L. "The House of the painter Juan de Arellano" in Spanish archive of art, 1984, pp. 325-326. BAYON, D. "Originality and significance of the first Spanish still lifes" in Revista de Ideas Estéticas, 1970. Bergstrom, i. Spanish master of still life and vases from the 17TH century. Madrid, 1970. -: "Flower pieces of Radial Composition in European 16th and 17th Century Art" in Album Amicorum J. G. van Gelder. The Hague, 1973. Bergstrom, i. et to the. Natura in poses. Milan, 1977. CALVO SERRALLER, f. (editor). Theory of the painting of the golden age. Madrid, 1991. -: (Commissioner). The Spanish Bodegón de Zurbarán to Picasso (exhibition catalogue). Bilbao, Museum of fine arts, 1999. -: (Commissioner). Spanish flowers in the golden century (exhibition catalog). Madrid, Museo del Prado, 2002 / 2003. CAVESTANY, j. (Commissioner). Vases and still lifes in Spanish painting (exhibition catalogue). Madrid, Palacio of the national library, 1936-1940. CEÁN BERMÚDEZ, J. A. Diccionario historical of the more illustrious teachers of the beautiful arts, 6 vols. Madrid, 1800. CHERRY, p. "New documents on Bartolomé Pérez" at Apollo, March, 1995, pp. 43-48. -: Art and nature. The Spanish still life in the golden age. Madrid, the history of Hispanic Art Foundation, 1999. DAVILA, f. "in the parish of San Torcuato de Santorcaz (Madrid). Two unknown pictures of Juan de Arellano"in Gallery antiquarian, 88, 1991. Duke OLIART, M. "flower painting. The work of Juan de Arellano"in Goya, 191, 1986, pp. 272-279. JORDAN, w. B. (Commissioner). Spanish Still life in the Golden Age: 1600-1650 (exhibition catalogue). Fort Worth, Kimbell Art Museum, 1985. JORDAN, w. B. & CHERRY, p. (Commissioners). Spanish Still life painting from Velazquez to Goya (exhibition catalogue). London, National Gallery, 1995. JORDAN, w. B. (Commissioner). An Eye on Nature (exhibition catalogue). London, Matthiesen Gallery, 1997. Martin, I. Juan de Arellano and the Flowers Painting in Madrid (doctoral thesis). Dallas, Southern Methodist University, 1980. PALOMINO DE CASTRO y VELASCO, to. The pictorial Museum and optical scale (2 vols., Madrid, 1715 and 1724). Madrid, 1947. -: Pictorial Museum and optical scale (2 vols., Madrid, 1715 and 1724), 3 vols. Madrid, 1988. PÉREZ SÁNCHEZ, A. E. (Commissioner). Spanish painting of still life and vases from 1600 to Goya (exhibition catalogue). Madrid, Museo del Prado, 1983. PÉREZ SÁNCHEZ, A. E. The nature morte espagnole du XVIIe siècle à Goya. Paris, 1987. -: (Commissioner). Juan de Arellano, 1614-1676 (exhibition catalogue). Madrid, Fundación Caja Madrid, 1998. PONZ, A. (18 vols., Madrid, 1772-94) Spain trip. Madrid, 1972. SCHEFFLER, f. Das spanische Stilleben des 17.Jahrhunderts: Theorie, Genese und Entfaltung einer neuen Bildgattung. Frankfurt am Main, Vervuert Verlag, 2000 SORIA, M. S. and KUBLER, G. Art and Architecture in Spain and Portugal and their American Dominions 1500-1800 (The Pelikan History of Art), 1959. TORMO, E. Alcala de Henares. Madrid, National Board of tourism, n.d. (h. 1930). VALDIVIESO, e. "An unpublished vase signed by Juan de Arellano" in Spanish archive of art, 1973, pp. 191-192. VALDIVIESO, e. "Palacio Real de Aranjuez. Vases and still life II, Dutch, Italian and Spanish schools"in real sites, 52, 1977. VALDIVIESO, e. "A Vanitas of Arellano and Camilo" in Bulletin of the seminar of study of art and archaeology, Valladolid, 1979, pp. 479-482. YOUNG, E. Four Centuries of Spanish Painting. Barnard Castle, The Bowes Museum, 1967 -: "New Perspectives in Spanish Still Life Painting in the Golden Age" in The Burlington Magazine, April, 1976, p. 213. Felix Scheffler "
  • Creator:
    Juan de Arellano (1614 - 1676)
  • Creation Year:
    Circa 1660
  • Dimensions:
    Height: 22.45 in (57 cm)Width: 27.56 in (70 cm)
  • More Editions & Sizes:
    57 x 70 cm.Price: $248,942
  • Medium:
  • Movement & Style:
  • Period:
  • Condition:
  • Gallery Location:
    Madrid, ES
  • Reference Number:
    1stDibs: LU128114769532
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