Mary Corita (Sister Corita) Kent Abstract Print - 1968 Sister Corita Pop Art Silkscreen Lithograph Heart Torn Paper Collage
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Mary Corita (Sister Corita) Kent
1968 Sister Corita Pop Art Silkscreen Lithograph Heart Torn Paper Collage

1968

About

Love's Complexity, 1968. Lithograph in permanent collection of Brooklyn Museum and Harvard Museum, This one is unique in that it is torn and collaged and framed thus. it is hand signed: l.r.: Corita Printed poem text reads: "I could take two leaves and give you one. Would that not be a kind of perfection? But I prefer one leaf torn to give you half showing (after these years, simply) love's complexity in an art, the tearing and unique edges—one leaf (one word) from the two imperfections that match". Hayden Carruth Corita Kent (November 20, 1918 – September 18, 1986), born Frances Elizabeth Kent and also known as Sister Mary Corita Kent, was an American Roman Catholic religious sister, artist, and educator. She worked almost exclusively with silkscreen, also known as serigraphy, pushing back the limitations of the two-dimensional medium by the development of innovative methods. Kent's emphasis on printing was partially due to her wish for democratic outreach, as she wished for affordable art for the masses. Her artwork, with its messages of love and peace, was particularly popular during the social upheavals of the 1960s and 1970s After a cancer diagnosis in the early 1970s, she entered an extremely prolific period in her career, including the Rainbow Swash design on the LNG storage tank in Boston, and the 1985 version of the United States Postal Service's special Love stamp. In recent years, Corita has gained increased recognition for her role in the pop art movement. Critics and theorists previously failed to count her work as part of any mainstream "canon," but in the last few years there has been a resurgence of attention given to Kent. As both a nun and a woman making art in the twentieth century, she was in many ways cast to the margins of the different movements she was a part of. According to Donna Steele, an exhibition’s curator, Kent’s work is “as important as that of Andy Warhol” to the Pop Art movement. “It stands up there with the work of the Pop Art greats – people like Robert Rauschenberg, Robert Indiana, Jasper Johns, Richard Hamilton and Peter Blake. It’s big and bold and it’s of the moment.” Kent used advertising slogans and song lyrics, as well as biblical verses and quotes from literature, to create vibrant silkscreens with trenchant political messages about racism, poverty and injustice. “What you get is this visual feast of twisted text and messages, and the more you look, the deeper you realise the messages go,” says Steele. “She picked up on everyday language and advertising slogans – this was the 1960s, and consumer culture was exploding; she used words like ‘tomato’, ‘burger’ and ‘goodness’ and she made them into messages about how we live, and about humanitarianism and how we care for others.” She took classes at Otis (now Otis College of Art and Design) and Chouinard Art Institute and earned her BA from Immaculate Heart College in 1941. She earned her MA at the University of Southern California in Art History in 1951. Between 1938 and 1968 Kent lived and worked in the Immaculate Heart Community She taught in the Immaculate Heart College and became the chair of its art department in 1964. Her classes at Immaculate Heart were an avant-garde mecca for prominent, ground-breaking artists and inventors, such as Alfred Hitchcock, John Cage, Saul Bass, Buckminster Fuller and Charles & Ray Eames. Kent credited Charles Eames, Buckminster Fuller, and art historian Dr. Alois Schardt for their important roles in her intellectual and artistic growth. During this time, Kent’s work became increasingly political, addressing events such as the Vietnam War and humanitarian crises. For example, she was commissioned by the Physicians for Social Responsibility to create what she called “we can create life without war” billboards. Tensions between the order and church leadership were mounting, with the Los Angeles archdiocese criticizing the college as “liberal” and Cardinal James McIntyre labeling the college as “communist” and Kent’s work as “blasphemous.” Due to this, Kent returned to secular life in 1968 as Corita Kent. Most sisters followed suit and the Immaculate Heart College closed in 1980. In 1985, Kent’s design for a United States Postal Service Stamp is issued. She did not attend the unveiling because she wanted it to happen at the United Nations and was not happy with the message that was sent when the design was unveiled on the Love Boat. Her 1985 work "love is hard work" was made in response. The stamp itself sold successfully- over 700 million times She died on September 18, 1986 in Watertown Massachusetts at the age of sixty-seven. She left her copyrights and unsold works to the Immaculate Heart College Community Kent created several hundred serigraph designs, for posters, book covers, and murals. Her work includes the 1985 United States Postal Service stamp Love and the 1971 Rainbow Swash, the largest copyrighted work of art in the world, covering a 150-foot (46 m) high natural gas tank in Boston. Kent was also commissioned to create work for the 1964 World’s Fair in New York, and the 1965 IBM Christmas display in New York. Her 1951 print, The Lord is with Thee had won first prizes in printmaking at the Los Angeles County Museum of History, Science, Art, and at the California State Fair Corita Kent worked at the intersection of several powerful and at times contradictory cultural, political, and religious influences. Corita Kent, inspired by the works of Andy Warhol, began using popular culture as raw material for her work in 1962. Her Pop art lithograph screen prints often incorporated the archetypical product of brands of American consumerism alongside spiritual texts. Her design process involved appropriating an original advertising graphic to suit her idea; for example, she would tear, rip, or crumble the image, then re-photograph it. She often used grocery store signage, texts from scripture, newspaper clippings, song lyrics, and writings from literary greats such as Gertrude Stein, E. E. Cummings, and Albert Camus as the textual focal point of her work. In her 1966 piece Tame It's Not, she uses quotes from Winnie the Pooh, Kierkegaard, and an ad slogan for men's cologne. One of Kent’s prints, love your brother (1969), depicts photographs of Martin Luther King Jr. overlaid with her handwritten words, “The king is dead. Love your brother”. Awards and recognition 1966- Named one of nine Women of the Year by the Los Angeles Times 1967- Featured on the cover of Newsweek 2016- Received the American Institute of Graphic Arts Medal Collections Corita Kent's work is held by many major art museums and private collectors. Work is Included in these Institution’s Collections: Achenbach Foundation for Graphic Arts Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco (de Young Museum and Legion of Honor) Addison Gallery of American Art Art Gallery of New South Wales Berkeley Art Museum Bibliothèque Nationale, Paris, France Brooklyn Museum The Centre Pompidou Frac île-de-france Hammer Museum UCLA Harvard Art Museums Hood Museum of Art Dartmouth College Iris & B. Gerald Cantor Center for Visual Arts Stanford University The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art Library of Congress Department of Prints Los Angeles County Museum of Art LACMA Ludwig Museum COLOGNE, GERMANY Metropolitan Museum of Art Museum Fine Arts BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS Museum of Contemporary Art MOCA LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA Museum of Fine Arts Museum of Modern Art MoMA NEW YORK, NEW YORK National Galleries of Scotland National Gallery of Art New York Public Library Philadelphia Museum of Art San Francisco Museum of Modern Art Skidmore College University of Michigan Victoria and Albert Museum LONDON, ENGLAND Whitney Museum of American Art

Details

  • Artist
    Mary Corita (Sister Corita) Kent (1918-1986, American)
  • Creation Year
    1968
  • Medium
  • Movement & Style
  • Condition
    Good
  • Condition Details
    torn down the middle and framed thus in original frame, (minor wear) as per the poem "But I prefer one leaf torn to give you half showing love's complexity in an art, the tearing and unique edges one leaf from the two imperfections that match."
  • Dimensions
    H 22.5 in. x W 23.5 in. x D 1.25 in.H 57.15 cm x W 59.69 cm x D 3.18 cm
  • Gallery Location
    Bal Harbour, FL
  • Reference Number
    LU3823542252
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