Skip to main content
Video Loading
Want more images or videos?
Request additional images or videos from the seller
1 of 22

Ceramic Red and Black, Style, Art Deco

About the Item

Ceramic Sign: Made in Austria Keramos 2051 19/M Wiener Keramos, later Keramos AG or Keramos KG , was a Viennese ceramics manufacturer that made a name for itself especially in the interwar period . In addition to their own designs, designs from the dissolved Wiener Werkstätte were also produced from 1932 onwards. In over 60 years of company history, around 3000 model designs have been produced by around 60 ceramists. Keramos also carried out commissions from the Wiener Werkstätte, such as vases by Dagobert Peche . History The origins of the Keramos company lie in two companies with the same name. The company Keramos – Invalid Society for Viennese Art Ceramics was founded at the end of 1919 on the initiative of the three ceramists Rudolf Wolf, Heinrich Wolf and Ludwig Rys, who had become invalids in World War I. Production started in September 1920. Art-ceramic lamps, figures, vases and boxes were produced. The company Keramos – Viennese art ceramics and porcelain manufactory was founded in 1920. Josef Hoffmann was a shareholder of Keramos for a long time, as was the sculptor Rudolf Podany, who was engaged from the start and created a large number of designs. From 1921 Anton Klieber was employed, who was also responsible for most of the models. Around 1924 both companies were merged and converted into an AG, commercial director became Otto Köller, the technical directors were the brothers Rudolf and Heinrich Wolf. "Some war invalid ceramists founded a workshop with the help of some artists, which was subsequently financed by the state and later enlarged with its participation and converted into a joint-stock company." The company's headquarters were in the Hofburg , Schwarze-Adler-Stiege, the factory in the 10th district of Vienna, Schleiergasse 17. Artistic collaborators at that time were Eduard Klablena , Otto Prutscher , Karl Perl , Karin Jarl-Sakellarios , IDA Schwetz- Lehmann and Grete Fucik-Fischmeister. On February 23, 1928, the triangular mark was entered in the trademark register. It was now also produced for the Wiener Werkstätte. Difficulties for the company arose from the Great Depression . Around 1932, 50 people were employed and a large number of models from Eduard Klabena and the dissolved Wiener Werkstätte were taken over. The works created by Keramos were labeled with their company brands until after 1941. From 1939 the economic situation of the company was better managed by taking over the production of ceramic winter welfare organization badges, the so-called WHW badges. Before 1941 the company is converted into a KG named Keramos, Wiener Kunstkeramik und Porzellanmanufaktur Brüder Wolf KG . Otto Köller was no longer active from this point on. After the end of World War II, Robert Obsieger recommended Robert Mathis as the new head of Keramos, who took over the management of the ceramics manufactory in 1945. In 1949 Mathis introduced a new company logo, which was used alongside the existing triangle mark, the so-called coat of arms mark. Anton Klieber and Rudolf Podany continued to work as ceramists, and new artists such as Josef Lorenzl and Stephan Dakon , both of whom had previously worked for Goldscheider , as well as Rudolf Chocholka, Karl Grössl and Ina Eisenbeisser were engaged. New models such as dancers, children's figures, animals and nudes were created, as well as the well-known wall masks, young people and poodles from the mid-1950s, which corresponded to the trend at the time. In addition, however, traditional designs such as Madonna statues and busts, saints and angels were still made. Utility ceramics such as crockery, vases, lamp bases, candle holders and flower pots also became an important branch of production, and cooperation with the German manufacturer Carstens at the beginning of the 1960s was just as lucrative. In the course of the 1960s, the sales markets for figurative ceramics became increasingly difficult. So until 1982, production was increasingly shifted to everyday ceramics, since ceramic figures were no longer modern due to changing tastes and the spirit of the times. Ultimately, the economic situation at Keramos became more and more difficult and Klaus Mathis, the son of Robert Mathis and then director, who succeeded his father at the helm of the company at the beginning of the 1970s, initiated the liquidation of the company at the end of 1982 . Staff The following artistic collaborators have worked for Keramos over the years: Hans Adametz , Franz Barwig the Elder , Franz Barwig the Younger , Andreas Beck, Hans Bolek, Angelo Bortolotti, Hertha Bucher , Rudolf Chocholka, Stephan Dakon , Ferdinand Doblinger, Eckstein, Franz Eggenberger , Ina Eisenbeisser, English, Stephan Erdös, Alois Feichtinger, Feyslitz, Hans Friedberger, Grete Fucik-Fischmeister, Kurt Goebel, Anton Grath, Karl Grössl, M. Günther, Otto Hafenrichter, Arnold Hartig , Friedrich Herkner, Trude Hillinger, Leopold Hohl, Hostasch, Karl Jamök, Karin Jarl-Sakellarios , Eduard Klablena, Klar, Anton Klieber, Maria Klinger, Josef Kostial, Josef Lorenzl , Wilhelm Otto Lugerth, Viktor Matula, Gusty Mundt-Amman, Novotny, Carl Perl, Rudolf Podany, Friedrich Pollak, Hugo Postl, Adolf Prischl, Otto Prutscher , Max Rieder , Elisabeth Rieger-Hofmann, Walter Ritter , Willibald Russ, Karl Sailer, Schönberg, Schwarz, Ida Schwetz-Lehmann , Sult, Robert Ullmann , Otto Weigand, IDA Weiss-Moricz, Rudolf Wolf. Exhibitions • Jubilee exhibition of the Wiener Kunstgewerbeverein, Austrian Museum , Vienna 1924. • Arts and Crafts Exhibition, Paris, 1925. • Exhibition of Austrian arts and crafts, Essen 1927. • Christmas show in the Vienna Künstlerhaus , 1929/30. • Werkbund exhibition in the Austrian Museum, Vienna 1930. • Exhibition The modern apartment in the Austrian Museum, Vienna 1930/31. • Exhibition Flower and Plastic , Wiener Künstlerhaus, 1931. • Exhibition 50 Years Wiener Kunstgewerbeverein in the Austrian Museum, Vienna 1934. • Exhibition of the New Austrian Werkbund in the Austrian Museum, Vienna 1935/36. Awards • Silver Medal (Arts and Crafts Exhibition, Paris, 1925) We have specialized in the sale of Art Deco and Art Nouveau and Vintage styles since 1982. If you have any questions we are at your disposal. Pushing the button that reads 'View All from Seller'. And you can see more objects to the style for sale. Why are there so many antiques in Argentina? In the 1880 – 1940 there was a grate wave of immigration encouraged by the periods of war that were taking place. 1st World War took place between 1914 and 1918 2nd World War took place between 1939 and 1945 The immigrants options were New York or Buenos Aires. Tickets were cheap and in Buenos Aires they were welcomed with open arms, as it was a country where everything was still to be done. Argentina was the country of new opportunities, labour was needed and religious freedom was assured, in many cases the of the family travel first until they were settled and then the rest of the family members join them. In the immigrant museum “Ellis Island Immigrant Building” in New York you can see the promotional posters of the boats that would take them to a new life. Between the years 1895 and 1896, Argentina had the highest DGP (gross domestic product) per capita in the world according to the Maddison Historical Statistics index, this situation arose due to the large amount of food being exported to European countries, which were at war. The Argentinean ships left the port of Buenos Aires with food, but they returned with furniture, clothes and construction elements, (it´s common to see this the old buildings of the historic neighbourhood of San Telmo, the beams with the inscription “Made in England)”, as well as many markets that were built in Buenos Aires, such us the San Telmo Market, whose structure was brought by ship and afterwards assembled in 900 Defensa Street. With the great influence of European immigrants living in the country, the children of the upper classes travelled to study in France, resulting in the inauguration of “La Maison Argentinienne”, on 27th of June 1928, in the international city of Paris, which hosted many Argentinians that were studying in Frace. It´s the fourth house to be built after France, Canada and Belgium, being the first Spanish-speaking one. Still in place today (17 Bd Jourdan, 75014, Paris, France). Many of the children of these wealthy families who attended international art exhibitions, museums and art courses abroad, took a keen interest in the European style. This is why Buenos Aires was at the time referred as “The Paris of South America”. Between the years 1890 and 1920 more than a hundred Palaces were built on Alvear Avenue the most exclusive avenue in Buenos Aires. Today some of these palaces have been transformed into museums, hotels and embassies. In the year 1936, the Kavanagh building was inaugurated, it was the tallest reinforced concrete building in South America. During 1994 the American Society of Civil Engineers distinguished it as an “international engineering milestone”, and it´s now considered a World Heritage of Modern Architecture. At the time was common to hire foreign architects such as Le Corbusier, who visited Buenos Aires/Argentina in 1929 and in 1948 he drew up the blueprints for a house built in La Plata City (which was declared a World Heritage Site). In 1947, the Hungarian architect Marcelo Breuer designed “Parador Ariston” in the seaside city of Mar del Plata. After an Argentinean student at Harvard University convinced him to come to Argentina. He worked on an urban development project in the Casa Amarilla, area of La Boca. The Ukrainian architect, Vladimiro Acosta, arrives in Argentina in 1928 and worked as an architect until que moved to Brazil. Antonio Bonet, a Spanish architect who worked with Le Corbusier in Paris, arrives in Argentina in 1937, where he carried out several architectural works and in 1938 designs the well-known BFK chair. Andres Kálnay, of Hungarian origin, made around 120 architectural masterpieces, among which the former Munich brewery stands out, he even made the furniture’s design. The German architect, Walter Gropius, director of the Bauhaus, lived in Argentina, where he wrote articles for “Sur” magazine and founded in Buenos Aires, an architectural firm with Franz Möller, who was also an architect, where he built two houses. At the same time several famous designers decided to immigrate to Argentina, among them we can find the well-known French designer, Jean-Michel Frank, who arrived in the country in 1940 and also worked for the Rockefeller family. Special pieces were made, which were sold exclusively in the country, such as the well-known German company “WMF”, who sold their products by catalogue, which were chosen by the ladies of High Society in the list of wedding gifts, as well as the pieces designed by Christofle. The Swiss sculptor Alberto Giacometti, made special pieces for Argentinean mansions. In 1904 the first Jansen branch outside Paris was established in Buenos Aires, as the Argentinean clientele demanded a large amount of furniture, from the end of the 19th century to the mid-20th century. In 1970, the brand Rigolleau Argentina made pieces authorised by Lalique. The brands Maple and Thompson also set up shop in the country. The French plastic artist, Marcel Duchamp moved to Argentina in 1918-1919. Glass signed Gallé, Charder, Leverre, Schneider, Muller and other French firms. They were bought in flower shops and were given to ladies with beautiful floral arrangements. Some furniture manufacturers travelled to international fairs and bough the patterns to produce the furniture in Argentina, such as the furniture firm Englander and Bonta, who bought the patterns INS Italy. It is worth mentioning that in Argentina we have the largest Community of Italians outside of Italy, as it is estimated that 70 percent of the inhabitants have at least one Italian descendant, followed by Spanish immigrants. The most important furniture stores in Argentina: Comte is founded in 1934 (under the direct management of Jean Michel Frank in 1940). Nordiska (Swedish company established in 1934). Churba in 1960, a company that brought foreign designers to present their furniture in the country: Denmark: (Arne Jacobsen, Finn Juhl, Bender Madsen, Ejner Larsen, Poul Kjaerholm, Hans Wegner) Sweden: (Hans Agne Jakobsson, Gustavsberg) United States: (Herman Miller) Finland: (Lisa Johansson, Folke Arstrom, Tapio Wirkkala, Alvar Aalto, Timo Sarpaneva) Swedish Factory: (Orrefors) Italy: (Littala, Vico Magistretti, Emma Gismondi, Gae Aulenti, Angelo Mangiarotti, Elio Martinelli, Gianna Celada, Angelo Mangiarotti, Mario Bellini, Carlo Scarpa) Finland: (Olivia Toikka) Plata Lappas (Lappas Silver): a goldsmith shop founded in 1887 in Argentina by Alcibiades Lappas of Greek origin. In 2019, in Argentina took place “the Art Deco world congress”, in which we participated as hosts invited by Geo Darder, founder of the Copperbridge – Foundation, in which prominent people from all over the world attended to learn about Art Deco in Argentina. Argentina currently has more than 100 Art Deco buildings and another 90 Art Nouveau buildings throughout the city of Buenos Aires. Argentina is a country that has not been involved in many wars, which is why it has been a refuge for works of art and antiques from different periods of time, unlike European countries. That is way many collectors, museums and antique dealers from all over the world visit it, you should not miss the opportunity to visit this great country. Laura Guevara Kjuder, architect.
  • Dimensions:
    Height: 20.87 in (53 cm)Width: 15.75 in (40 cm)Depth: 8.27 in (21 cm)
  • Style:
    Art Deco (Of the Period)
  • Materials and Techniques:
  • Place of Origin:
  • Period:
  • Date of Manufacture:
    1934
  • Condition:
    Wear consistent with age and use.
  • Seller Location:
    Ciudad Autónoma Buenos Aires, AR
  • Reference Number:
    Seller: C-011stDibs: LU6785234547252
More From This SellerView All
  • Ceramic Red and Black, Style: Art Deco
    Located in Ciudad Autónoma Buenos Aires, C
    Ceramic We have specialized in the sale of Art Deco and Art Nouveau and Vintage styles since 1982. If you have any questions we are at your disposal. Pushing the button that reads ...
    Category

    Vintage 1930s German Mid-Century Modern Table Lamps

    Materials

    Ceramic

  • Ceramic Art Deco
    Located in Ciudad Autónoma Buenos Aires, C
    We have specialized in the sale of Art Deco and Art Nouveau and Vintage styles since 1982. If you have any questions we are at your disposal. Pushing the button that reads 'View All...
    Category

    Vintage 1920s French Art Deco Centerpieces

    Materials

    Ceramic

  • Ceramic Art Deco
    Located in Ciudad Autónoma Buenos Aires, C
    Ceramic We have specialized in the sale of Art Deco and Art Nouveau and Vintage styles since 1982. If you have any questions we are at your disposal. Pushing the button that reads ...
    Category

    Vintage 1930s German Mid-Century Modern Centerpieces

    Materials

    Ceramic

  • Ceramic, Sign: Made in Germany, Style: Jugendstil, Art Nouveau, Liberty
    Located in Ciudad Autónoma Buenos Aires, C
    Sign: Made in Germany Design: kunstabteilung We have specialized in the sale of Art Deco and Art Nouveau and Vintage styles since 1982. If you have any questions we are at your dispo...
    Category

    Antique Early 1900s German Art Nouveau Centerpieces

    Materials

    Ceramic

  • Pair of Ceramics, Boch.F, Sign: Catherine Barjansky, Belgium
    Located in Ciudad Autónoma Buenos Aires, C
    Pair of ceramics Sign: Ceramic with enamel : Catherine Barjansky Made in Belgica Boch Ceramic White: Sign: BFK made in Belgium The Boch manufacture was established in Belgian La Louvière by Jean-François Boch, one of main owners of another known company, Villeroy & Boch. The direction of Boch Freres SNC was in 1844 taken by Victor Boch. Production could be started immediately thanks to other Boch family ceramic businesses that sold Victor ready-to-use copperplates. This faience manufacture developed very fast. In 1847 the company won a gold medal at the exhibition of the Belgian industry. In 1855 they already employeed 300 workers in La Louvière (Keramis) and 100 in Tournai (Boch Freres) factory. Around 1860 the production of polychrome pieces was started. In 1904 the first in Europe tunnel kiln was launched. Problems started in 1970s. The company went bankrupt in 1985 and was reactivated as Novoboch and MRL Boch. In 2015 was started Keramis Center, just two rooms showing Royal Boch history. One of the most important designers for Boch Frères Keramis was Charles Catteau. He was French but in 1906 moved to La Louvière. Patterns designed by Catteau were created in following years: The Boch Frères Kéramis factory (Belgium, province of Hainaut, La Louvière) is now well known thanks to the work of the very dynamic Charles Catteau. That of the sculptor Catherine Barjansky is much less so, even if her career is international: Rome, Berlin, New York, Vienna, Paris, Brussels... Catherine is from Odessa, a Ukrainian city located in the Soviet Empire. At the age of twenty, she studied sculpture in Monaco where she met her husband, Alexandre Barjansky, the famous violinist whose name is now inseparable from a Stradivarius! Thanks to her husband's job, she travels a lot. Witnesses to his exchanges with the intellectual milieu of the time, his portraits of personalities dominate his work: a bust of Einstein, kept at the Solvay Institute in Brussels; a bust of Freud; or even Colette, author who prefaced her first exhibition in Brussels. She made a bust of Queen Elisabeth of Belgium...
    Category

    Vintage 1930s Belgian Art Deco Figurative Sculptures

    Materials

    Ceramic

  • Marble bear, Style: Art deco, Year: 1930, Sign: Fec. E. Beep
    Located in Ciudad Autónoma Buenos Aires, C
    We have specialized in the sale of Art Deco and Art Nouveau and Vintage styles since 1982. If you have any questions we are at your disposal. Pushing the button that reads 'View All ...
    Category

    Vintage 1930s French Art Nouveau Centerpieces

    Materials

    Marble

You May Also Like
  • French Art Deco Ceramic Black Lion, 1930s
    By Studio Art Deco
    Located in Saint-Amans-des-Cots, FR
    Black lion, France, 1930s ceramic. This lion has been made in black, green, and red. This is the black one! Same period as Charles Lemanceau, François Pompon, Lejean, Jean & Jacques ...
    Category

    Vintage 1930s French Art Deco Animal Sculptures

    Materials

    Ceramic

  • French Art Deco Glazed Ceramic Woman and Dolphin Sculpture
    Located in Isle Sur La Sorgue, Vaucluse
    Lovely glazed ceramic representation of a nude woman reclining on a dolphin's back. Craquelure finish on the woman. Signed and dated "GN, 1946."
    Category

    Mid-20th Century French Art Deco Ceramics

  • French Art Deco Ceramic Tigers, 1930s
    By ODYV
    Located in Saint-Amans-des-Cots, FR
    French Art Deco ceramic sculpture by Odette Berlot & Yvonne Mussier (Vierzon, 1927-1940), France, 1930s. Three tigers. Measures: height: 8.3"(21cm), width : 20.5"(52cm), depth: 3.9"(...
    Category

    Vintage 1930s French Art Deco Animal Sculptures

    Materials

    Ceramic

  • ODYV French Art Deco Ceramic Monkey, 1930
    By ODYV
    Located in Saint-Amans-des-Cots, FR
    French Art Deco crackle glaze ceramic sculpture by BERLOT-MUSSIER (Vierzon, 1929-1939), France, ca.1930. Monkey. Height: 6.4"(16.3cm), Width : 6.9"(17.5cm), Depth: 4.1"(10.5cm). Mark...
    Category

    Vintage 1930s French Art Deco Animal Sculptures

    Materials

    Ceramic

  • Art Deco Ceramic Bust Figurine, C1930
    Located in Devon, England
    For your consideration is this petite and very skillfully painted Art Deco ceramic head marked underneath foreign . Measuring just 8 cm in height...
    Category

    Mid-20th Century European Art Deco Busts

    Materials

    Ceramic

  • French Art Deco Ceramic Bust of a Young Faun
    Located in Winter Park, FL
    A French Art Deco craquelé ceramic bust of a young faun with pointed ears and a garland of leaves on his head. Marble base. Weight: 4.5 lbs. Please refer to photos for more details. ...
    Category

    20th Century French Art Deco Busts

    Materials

    Marble

Recently Viewed

View All