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Authentic Antique British Pub Sign, "Lord Kitchener, Morrell's"

About the Item

A framed black painted wood sign with a polychrome image of Kitchener in uniform standing in front of the Union Jack. Gilt text on both sides (for Morrell's beer and ale). Dimensions: 32" L, 1 7/8" D, 39" H Condition: Please see all detail photos. The sign is well-worn overall, weathered, consistent with outdoor use and presenting in a fine authentic manner.
  • Dimensions:
    Height: 39 in (99.06 cm)Width: 32 in (81.28 cm)Depth: 1.88 in (4.78 cm)
  • Style:
    Campaign (In the Style Of)
  • Materials and Techniques:
  • Place of Origin:
  • Period:
  • Date of Manufacture:
    Late 19th Century
  • Condition:
    Wear consistent with age and use. Minor losses.
  • Seller Location:
    Bridgeport, CT
  • Reference Number:
    Seller: 948331stDibs: LU1755233621412
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