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Clarence Holbrook Carter
Mandala No. 5, Blue Abstract Ovoid Mid-Century Painting

1968

About the Item

Clarence Holbrook Carter (American, 1904-2000) Mandala No. 5, 1968 Acrylic on scintilla Signed on verso 29.5 x 22 inches Clarence Holbrook Carter achieved a level of national artistic success that was nearly unprecedented among Cleveland School artists of his day, with representation by major New York dealers, scores of awards and solo exhibits, and streams of praise flowing from pens of the top art critics. Over the course of his 60+ year career Carter evolved from an exceptionally fine American Scene painter capable of evoking deep reservoirs of mood, into an abstractionist with a strongly surrealist bent.
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