Skip to main content
Want more images or videos?
Request additional images or videos from the seller
1 of 13

Adam Frans van der Meulen
Louis XIV and his army at the crossing of the Rhine by Adam-Frans van der Meulen

circa 1680

About the Item

Adam-Frans van der Meulen (Bruxelles, 1632 - Paris, 1690) Louis XIV and his army at the crossing of the Rhine 12 June 1672 Signed A.F VANDERMEULEN at the right low corner Oil on canvas : h. 88 cm, w. 130 cm Carved giltwood Louis XIV style frame Framed: h. 103 cm, w. 145 cm This painting illustrates one of the most famous episodes of the Dutch War, the crossing of the Rhine near Tolhuis by Louis XIV and his armies on June 12, 1672. The French invasion of the Dutch Republic took place on June 12, 1672, when, with an army of 120,000 men, the largest that Europe had seen since the Roman Empire, Louis XIV entered the Netherlands at the junction of the Rhine at Lobith. Here, Louis XIV is shown in the right foreground on his white horse leading his men with his sword. Dutch and French forces clash in the river below, while Lobith's Tower is on fire in the background. Several autograph versions by Adam Frans van der Meulen as well as workshop variants in different formats with variations in the landscape are listed in public and private collections. The only version considered enterily executed by the hand of Van der Meulen is the painting in Musée des Beaux-Arts de Caen. Related works : • Rijksmuseum Amsterdam, Adam Frans van der Meulen, oil on canvas : 103 x 159 cm • Louvre Museum, Adam Frans Van der Meulen, oil on canvas: 49 × 111 cm • Musée des Beaux-Arts de Caen, Adam Frans Van der Meulen, oil on canvas : 83 x 156 cm • Musée des Beaux-Arts de Dijon, Adam Frans Van der Meulen, oil on canvas : 77 x 109 cm • Château Vaux le Vicomte, Adam Frans Van der Meulen, oil on canvas, unknown size • Christie’s 26 juin 2008, workshop of Van der Meulen, oil on canvas: 105,7 x 170 cm • Sotheby’s Paris, 15 juin 2017, Adam Frans Van der Meulen, oil on canvas : 66 x 82 cm • Sotheby’s New York, 6 juin 2012, workshop of Van der Meulen, oil on canvas : 81 x 114 cm
  • Creator:
    Adam Frans van der Meulen (1632 - 1690)
  • Creation Year:
    circa 1680
  • Dimensions:
    Height: 57.09 in (145.01 cm)Width: 40.55 in (103 cm)
  • Medium:
  • Movement & Style:
  • Period:
    1670-1679
  • Condition:
    Very good original condition, cleaned and revarnished by our professionnal art restorer.
  • Gallery Location:
    PARIS, FR
  • Reference Number:
    1stDibs: LU2433214005172
More From This SellerView All
  • A 17th c. Italian school, Capriccio with the Colosseum, circle of V. Codazzi
    Located in PARIS, FR
    A capriccio with the Colosseum in Roma 17th century Italian school Circle of Viviano Codazzi (1604-1670) Oil on canvas Dimensions: h. 35.43 in, w. 51.18 in Modern 17th century style ...
    Category

    17th Century Old Masters Landscape Paintings

    Materials

    Canvas, Oil

  • Allegory of Summer, workshop of Hendrick Van Balen 17th c. Antwerp school
    By Hendrick van Balen
    Located in PARIS, FR
    Allegory of summer, personified by Ceres Workshop of Hendrick Van Balen Antwerp School, early 17th century. Oil on copper, Dimensions: h. 52 cm, l. 40cm Antic giltwood frame Framed dimensions: h. 74 cm, l. 60cm Very good condition Our delicately painted work is part of the pictorial tradition that is both allegorical and mythological in vogue in Antwerp, whose leaders are Jan Brueghel the Younger and Hendrick Van Balen. Numerous works emerging from their workshops illustrate mythological subjects, the seasons, the elements, the senses or intertwining the lush landscapes, animals and gods of Olympus. At the heart of a green landscape dominated in its center by a generous apple tree, the beautiful Ceres, partially dressed in a large blue drape, is wearing a crown of ears of wheat, her symbol of the goddess of the earth and harvests. She holds the sickle in her right hand and carries sheaves of wheat. To her right a nymph holds the cornucopia while puttis pick and offer flowers. In the foreground are the summer fruits: figs, cherries, apples and lemons. A squirrel munching on cherries symbolizes toil and foresight, themes that are echoed in the work of the harvesters on the wheat fields in the background. The background is composed of vegetation, on the right a wild rose bush with its branches erect against a tree trunk, in the center of the trees with silvery green foliage. Our painter, a student of Hendrick Van Balen, finds his inspiration in the works of the master such as this nymph in yellow drapery seen from behind, one of the figures which accompanies many of the master's paintings. The elegant gestures, the flesh...The indisputable influence of Jan Brueghel the Younger is revealed in the treatment of trees and flowers, wild roses, tulips as well as in the still life with the squirrel in the foreground. The craze for this type of virtuoso painting where the mythological figures are only a pretext to better illustrate the landscape and plant species surrounding them, then generated orders from all over Europe. Hendrick Van Balen, Flemish painter, born and died in Antwerp (1575-1632). A student of Adam Van Noort, he entered the guild of Saint-Luc in 1593, later trained in Italy and was Van Dyck's first master. He often painted small characters taken from scenes from the Bible or classical mythology, on paintings in which Josse de Momper...
    Category

    Early 17th Century Old Masters Figurative Paintings

    Materials

    Copper

  • 17th c. Flemish - Landscape with Flight to Egypt - Antwerp circa 1630
    Located in PARIS, FR
    LANDSCAPE WITH FLIGHT TO EGYPT, JASPER VAN DER LANEN (ANTWERP, 1585 - 1634) 17TH CENTURY FLEMISH SCHOOL ANTWERP CIRCA 1630 Oil on copper, dimensions: h. 10.23 in, w. 14.96 in Flemish style frame in ebonized wood adorned with wavy moldings and wood veneer. Framed dimensions: h. 17.32 in, w. 21.65 in Provenance: Philips auction...
    Category

    Early 17th Century Old Masters Figurative Paintings

    Materials

    Copper

  • 17th c. Antwerp studio of J. Brueghel & H. van Balen - The Virgin with Child
    Located in PARIS, FR
    Workshop of Jan Brueghel the Younger (1601-1678) & Hendrick van Balen (Antwerp, 1575 – 1632) 17th century Antwerp School The Virgin and Child ...
    Category

    1630s Old Masters Figurative Paintings

    Materials

    Oil

  • Adam and Eve in paradise, studio of Jan Brueghel the Younger, 17th century
    Located in PARIS, FR
    Studio of Jan Brueghel the Younger 17th century Antwerp school Oil on oak panel, h. 37 cm, w. 49 cm Tortoiseshell veneered baroque style frame...
    Category

    Mid-17th Century Old Masters Figurative Paintings

    Materials

    Oil, Wood Panel

  • Flemish 17th c., Allegory of war and peace, circa 1630, by Adriaen van Stalbemt
    Located in PARIS, FR
    Adriaen van Stalbemt (Antwerp, 1580-1662) Allegory of Peace and War, circa 1620-1630 Oil on oak panel: h. 49.5 cm, l. 73.2cm (19.29 x 28.74 in) Giltwood frame with laurel leaves, Lo...
    Category

    Early 17th Century Old Masters Figurative Paintings

    Materials

    Oil, Panel

You May Also Like
  • Shipping in Stormy Waters, Attributed to Italian Artist Francesco Guardi
    By Francesco Guardi
    Located in Stockholm, SE
    The splendour of the tragic sea Francesco Guardi and maritime painting in Venetian art No Venetian painter was a stranger to the sea. After all, Venice was not only one of the most prominent ports of the Mediterranean, but indeed a city literally submerged in the ocean from time to time. Curiously however, the famous Venetian school of painting showed little interest in maritime motifs, favouring scenes from the iconic architecture of the city rather than seascapes. That is why this painting is a particularly interesting window into not only the painter Francesco Guardi himself – but to the significance of the element of water in art history, in absence as well as in the centre of attention. Whether it be calm, sunny days with stunning views of the palaces alongside the canals of Venice or – more rarely – stormy shipwrecking tragedies at sea, water as a unifying element is integral to the works of painter Francesco Guardi (1712–1793). During his lifetime, Venetian art saw many of its greatest triumphs with names like Tiepolo or Canaletto gaining international recognition and firmly establishing Venice as one of the most vibrant artistic communities of Europe. While the city itself already in the 18th century was something of an early tourist spot where aristocrats and high society visited on their grand tour or travels, the artists too contributed to the fame and their work spread the image of Venice as the city of romance and leisure to an international audience, many of whom could never visit in person. Still today, the iconic image of Venice with its whimsical array of palaces, churches and other historic buildings is much influenced by these artists, many of whom have stood the test of time like very well and remain some of the most beloved in all of art history. It was not primarily subtility, intellectual meanings or moral ideals that the Venetian art tried to capture; instead it was the sheer vibrancy of life and the fast-paced city with crumbling palaces and festive people that made this atmosphere so special. Of course, Venice could count painters in most genres among its residents, from portraiture to religious motifs, history painting and much else. Still, it is the Vedutas and views of the city that seems to have etched itself into our memory more than anything else, not least in the tradition of Canaletto who was perhaps the undisputed master of all Venetian painters. Born into his profession, Francesco lived and breathed painting all his life. His father, the painter Domenico Guardi (1678–1716) died when Francesco was just a small child, yet both he and his brothers Niccolò and Gian Antonio continued in their fathers’ footsteps. The Guardi family belonged to the nobility and originated from the mountainous area of Trentino, not far from the Alps. The brothers worked together on more challenging commissions and supported each other in the manner typical of family workshops or networks of artists. Their sister Maria Cecilia married no other than the artist Giovanni Battista Tiepolo himself, linking the family to the most renowned Venetian name of the time. During almost a decade, Guardi worked in the studio of Michele Giovanni Marieschi, sometimes simply known as Michiel, a painted similar in both style and motif. Canaletto is, however, the artist Guardi is most often compared to since they shared a mutual fascination for depicting the architecture and cityscape of Venice. During the course of his career, Guardi tried his hand in many different genres. He was as swift in painting landscapes, Vedutas of Venice, sacred motifs, interiors and architectural compositions as he was in a number of other motifs. His style is typical of the Venetian school but also distinct and personal once we look a little closer. There is an absolute certainty in the composition, the choice of which sometimes feels like that of a carefully calculated photograph – yet it is also very painterly, in the best sense of the word: fluid, bold, sensitive and full of character. The brushwork is rapid, intense, seemingly careless and extraordinarily minute at the same time; fresh and planned in a very enjoyable mixture. His interiors often capture the breath-taking spacious glamour of the palaces and all their exquisite decor. He usually constructed the motif through remarkably simple, almost spontaneous yet intuitively precise strokes and shapes. The result was a festive, high-spirited atmospheric quality, far away from the sterile and exact likeness that other painters fell victim to when trying to copy Canaletto. The painting here has nothing of the city of Venice in it. On the contrary, we seem to be transported far away into the solitary ocean, with no architecture, nothing to hold on to – only the roaring sea and the dangerous cliffs upon which the ships are just moments away from being crushed upon. It is a maritime composition evoking both Flemish and Italian precursors, in the proud tradition of maritime painting that for centuries formed a crucial part of our visual culture. This genre of painting is today curiously overlooked, compared to how esteemed and meaningful it was when our relationship to the sea was far more natural than it is today. When both people and goods travelled by water, and many nations and cities – Venice among them – depended entirely on sea fare, the existential connection to the ocean was much more natural and integrated into the imagination. The schools and traditions of maritime art are as manifold as there are countries connected to the sea, and all reflect the need to process the dangers and wonders of the ocean. It could symbolize opportunity, the exciting prospects of a new countries and adventures, prospering trade, beautiful scenery as well as war and tragedy, loss of life, danger and doom. To say that water is ambivalent in nature is an understatement, and these many layers were something that artists explored in the most wondrous ways. Perhaps it takes a bit more time for the modern eye to identify the different nuances and qualities of historic maritime paintings, they may on first impression seem hard to differentiate from each other. But when allowing these motifs to unfold and tell stories of the sea in both fiction and reality – or somewhere in between – we are awarded with an understanding of how the oceans truly built our world. In Guardi’s interpretation, we see an almost theatrically arranged shipwrecking scene. No less than five ships are depicted right in the moment of utter disaster. Caught in a violent storm, the waves have driven them to a shore of sharp cliffs and if not swallowed by the waves, crushing against the cliffs seems to be the only outcome. The large wooden ships are impressively decorated with elaborate sculpture, and in fact relics already during Guardi’s lifetime. They are in fact typical of Dutch and Flemish 17th century ships, giving us a clue to where he got the inspiration from. Guardi must have seen examples of Flemish maritime art, that made him curious about these particular motifs. One is reminded of Flemish painters like Willem van de Velde and Ludolf Backhuysen, and this very painting has indeed been mistakenly attributed to Matthieu van Plattenberg...
    Category

    18th Century Old Masters Landscape Paintings

    Materials

    Canvas, Oil

  • 18th Century Neoclassical Oil Painting of the Trojan War: Briseis & Achilles
    By James Thornhill
    Located in London, GB
    James Thornhill (1674-1735) Oil on canvas 12 x 14 inches; 16 ½ x 18 ½ in. Inc. frame The subject matter and inclusion of herms on both sides shows the influence of Louis...
    Category

    Early 18th Century Old Masters Figurative Paintings

    Materials

    Oil, Canvas

  • 18th Century English Oil Landscape Painting: Elegant Figures alongside River Wye
    By Attributed to William Marlow
    Located in London, GB
    Attributed to William Marlow (English, 1740-1813) Elegant Figures alongside the River Wye 1790 131 x 152 cm, inc. frame This quiet bucolic scene shows figur...
    Category

    Late 18th Century Old Masters Figurative Paintings

    Materials

    Canvas, Oil

  • Peasants in a Cornfield (Boer in het veld) by David Teniers the Younger
    By David Teniers the Younger
    Located in Stockholm, SE
    Remembering the magic of everyday life moments in the art of David Teniers: The art of David Teniers the Younger (1610–1690) coincided with the heyday of the Flemish Baroque and captured a great variety of motifs of his time. In this painting of a seemingly simple peasant scene lies keys to understanding both the imaginative mind of Teniers as well as why this time period produced some of the most iconic works in all of art history.  As indicated by the name, Teniers was more or less born into his profession. As the son of David Teniers the elder, himself a painter who studied under Rubens, the younger David received training in art from a very young age and had no less than three brothers who also became painters. Because of his father’s frequent financial failures that even at times saw him imprisoned, David the younger helped to rescue the family from ruin through painting copies of old masters. Essentially, the young Teniers was confronted with painting as both a passion and creative expression as well as a necessity during difficult times, an experience that would shape much of his capacity and sensitivity in his coming life. Despite the hardships, the talent and determination of Teniers was recognized and quickly expanded his possibilities. He had already spent time in France and possibly also England when he was hired by his father’s former teacher Rubens to help with a prestigious commission with mythological paintings, now considered lost, for Philip IV the king Spain. In 1644–54 Teniers was appointed dean of the Antwerp Guild of Saint Luke, manifesting his esteemed position within the artistic community. A few years afterwards he took an important step when relocating to Brussels, where Teniers yet again found new career opportunities that would prove to be very successful. As the keeper of the collections of Archduke Leopold Wilhelm, a role similar to what we now refer to as an art advisor, Teniers purchased hundreds of important artworks that manifested the prominent status of the Archduke’s collection while at the same time providing an unusual access to inspiration and knowledge for Teniers himself. Since he kept on painting during the same time, his creative scope must have seemed almost bewildering in the great variety of images and stories that he surrounded himself with.  Regardless of how glamorous and culturally stimulating the career of Teniers was, he was as open to the charm and existential importance of everyday life as he was to works of great masters and luxurious collectibles. In his impressive repertoire of genres with everything from exquisite royal portraits, interiors, landscapes and history paintings he always added something new and inventive, highlighting the possibilities of art and importance of an experimental and intuitive mind. It is difficult to single out one aspect or genre to summarize his legacy, since it lies much more in the broad virtuosity across many motifs, although he is particularly remembered for farm scenes and meticulously depicted interiors where other paintings and artworks are captured with an astonishing precision. However, the fact that he is still today one of the most known and celebrated names of the Dutch Golden Age is a proof to the magic of his work, which continues to spark dialogue and wonder in the contemporary viewer of his works. The farm boy in the field in this painting, which likely dates to the mature part of his career, is a wonderful entry into the mind of Teniers. In the tightly cropped motif, we see him standing right in the middle of the busy harvest when men, women and everyone capable were sent out in the field to collect the crop that formed the very core of their diet and survival. In the background we see a fresh blue sky interspersed with skillfully painted clouds, some trees reaching their autumnal colours and in the far distance the glimpse of a small church and village. The presence of a church in a landscape, so typical of Dutch art, served both a symbolic and visual function as a representation of faith while at the same time defining scale and distance. In the field, the work is in full action with the farmers spread out in various positions, all in the midst of hard and sweaty labour. While they are portrayed as having nothing else than the work on their mind, our farm boy seems to have his attention directed elsewhere. Standing there with his white, half open shirt, flowy curls and strong, sturdy body; his gaze is directed away, out of the picture and the scythes in his hands. He looks almost smirking, expressed with tremendous subtlety in the slight smile of his lips and big eyes, being just in the middle of losing focus on the work. What is it that steals his attention? What has he seen, or realized, or felt – to break him free of the arduous task of harvesting, if but for a moment? Here starts the wondering and the questions that are the hallmark of a great piece of art. Instead of explicitly locking in the motif in overly clear symbolism Teniers has chosen an open ended, subtle yet striking moment for us to consider. While it of course can be related to numerous other farm scene depictions of this time, and clever usages of gazes and real-life scenes to underscore various moral or symbolic meanings, the painting can be much more of a contemplation than an explanation or illustration. The ordinary nature and understated yet emotionally textured composition of the motif gives greater space for our own reactions and thoughts. Has he seen a pretty farm girl just passing by? Is he fed up with the farm life, joyously dreaming away for a minute, imagining another future? Or is he simply in need of distraction, looking away and ready for anything that can steal his attention? One quality that never seem to have escaped Teniers was that of curiosity. During all of his career he constantly investigated, expanded and experimented with not only the style and technique of painting, but with the vision of art itself. Being credited with more or less introducing farm motifs for a broader audience not only tells us of his ability to understand the demand for different motifs, but the sensitivity to transform seemingly ordinary parts of life into deep aesthetic experiences, far beyond their expected reach. The farm boy in this painting is, of course, exactly that. But with the help of one smirk the entire picture is charged with a different energy, awakening many contrasts and relationships between the calm landscape, the hard work and his own breach of effectivity, holding sharp scythes while thinking or seeing something else. It is no wonder Teniers chose to work with farm scenes as a way of investigating these intricate and delicate plays on expectations and surprises, clarity and ambivalence. It invites us to an appreciation of human everyday life that connects us with the people of 17th century...
    Category

    Late 17th Century Old Masters Landscape Paintings

    Materials

    Oil, Canvas

  • Large 18th Century English Old Master Oil Painting Portrait of Lady on canvas
    Located in Cirencester, Gloucestershire
    Portrait of a Lady English School, 18th century oil on canvas, unframed canvas : 31 x 25 inches provenance: private collection, UK condition: good and sound condition
    Category

    Early 18th Century Old Masters Landscape Paintings

    Materials

    Oil, Canvas

  • Antique Roman painter - 18th century landscape painting - Wanderers - Italy
    Located in Varmo, IT
    Roman painter (18th century) - Landscape with wayfarers. 43.5 x 34.5 cm without frame, 58.5 x 49.5 cm with frame. Antique oil painting on canvas, in carved and gilded wooden frame....
    Category

    Early 18th Century Old Masters Figurative Paintings

    Materials

    Canvas, Oil

Recently Viewed

View All