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Francis Morrow
China Camp San Rafael by Francis Morrow

1979

About the Item

Chinese fishing village watercolor painting by Frances Morrow (American, 20th Century). Signed "Morrow" and dated "79" lower left and "The Fishing Village", "Francis Morrow on Verso". Unframed. China Camp State Park: The park is nestled along the shore of the San Pablo Bay. The road through the park offers beautiful views of the waterfront. Features include an extensive inter-tidal salt marsh, meadow, and oak habitats. There is a variety of wildlife, including deer, squirrels, coyote, fox, bats, and numerous birds. The California clapper rail and the salt marsh harvest mouse are endangered species that live in the marsh areas of the park. A Chinese shrimp-fishing village thrived on this site in the 1880s. Nearly 500 people, originally from Canton, China, lived in the village. In its heyday, there were three general stores, a marine supply store and a barber shop. Fishermen by trade in their native country, they gravitated to the work they knew best. Over 90% of the shrimp they netted were dried and shipped to China or Chinese communities throughout the US. The museum at China Camp Village helps tell the story of these hardy shrimp fishermen.
  • Creator:
    Francis Morrow (American)
  • Creation Year:
    1979
  • Dimensions:
    Height: 18 in (45.72 cm)Width: 24 in (60.96 cm)Depth: 1 in (2.54 cm)
  • Medium:
  • Movement & Style:
  • Period:
  • Condition:
  • Gallery Location:
    Soquel, CA
  • Reference Number:
    Seller: SJ44621stDibs: LU5421585173
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Norman also wrote about Margules' routine acts of kindness, taking in homeless artists, constantly feeding his friends and providing the salvatory loan where needed. Norman also notes that Margules was blessed with a loud and good voice, and was apt to sing an operatic air without provocation. The writer and television personality Alexander King said I think the outstanding characteristics of my friend's personality are affirmation, emphasis, and overemphasis. He chooses to express himself predominantly in superlatives and the gestures which accompany his utterances are sometimes dangerous to life and limb. Of the bystanders, I mean. 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