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Ruins Landscape Codazzi Paint Oil on canvas Old master 18th Century Roma Italy

1680-1760

About the Item

Roman school late 17th - early 18th century - Follower of Niccolò Codazzi (Naples, 1642 - Genoa, 1693) Pair of fantastic architectural whims with classical ruins and figures Oils on canvas, cm. 47 x 60, framed cm. 55 x 68 A suggestive perspective of classical architectural ruins dominates the scene in this beautiful pair of capricci, whose style characteristics appear to be influenced by the models designed by Viviano (1604 - 1670) and his son Niccolò Codazzi (1642-1693), who collaborated in the atelier paternal in Rome before pursuing an independent career. The present pendant, in particular, is the work of an author active between the end of the seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries, very similar to the ways of Niccolò Codazzi in the central period of his Roman production, when he used to collaborate with some bamboccianti, who usually inserted small contour figures to animate the whims. After his youth in Naples and the activity in his father's workshop, Niccolò Codazzi, with his works from the Roman period, began to develop an independent artistic personality, and the present painting represents an excellent model of this process. In his architectural views and inventions he prefers a clear and luminous palette, marked by deep chiaroscuro contrasts and a decisive volumetric rendering. As for the composition, on the other hand, it reproduces the Roman ruins with a faithful analysis, or, if built with imagination, they always had to be based on a level of verisimilitude, with the light that exposed the monumental architectures in ruins, the crumbling arches , the corroded walls, leaning against ancient monuments now invaded by vegetation. Both the canvases and the frames are in good condition, with some signs of aging. The pictorial material is preserved in an excellent way. WORK WITH A PHOTOGRAPHIC AUTHENTICITY CERTIFICATE IN COMPLIANCE WITH LAW (FIMA ITALIA). For more information, please contact us.
  • Creation Year:
    1680-1760
  • Dimensions:
    Height: 21.66 in (55 cm)Width: 26.78 in (68 cm)
  • Medium:
  • Movement & Style:
  • Circle Of:
    Niccolò Codazzi (Naples, 1642 - Genoa, 1693) (1642 - 1693, Italian)
  • Period:
  • Condition:
  • Gallery Location:
    Riva del Garda, IT
  • Reference Number:
    1stDibs: LU98818230102
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