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Joe Tilson
Joe Tilson British Pop Art Screenprint, Color Lithograph 4 Seasons 4 Elements

c.1975

About the Item

Silkscreen screenprint or Lithograph Hand signed and numbered. An esoteric, mystical, Kabbala inspired print with Hebrew as well as other languages. Joseph Charles Tilson RA (born 24 August 1928 in London) is an English pop art painter, sculptor and printmaker. Born in 1928, Tilson served in the Royal Air Force (1946–49), after which he studied in London at St Martin's School of Art (1949–52) under Leon Kossoff and Frank Auerbach. He later attended the Royal College of Art in London, where he won the prestigious Rome Prize. The artist represented the United Kingdom in the 32nd Venice Biennale in 1964, which famously included the works of Robert Rauschenberg, Jasper Johns, Claes Oldenburg, and Jim Dine. He returned to London in 1957, and from 1958 to 1963 he taught at St Martin's School of Art, and subsequently taught at the Slade School of Fine Art, University College London and The School of Visual Arts, New York and the Hochschule fur Bildende Künste, Hamburg. In 1961 he exhibited at the Paris Biennale. During the 1960s Tilson became one of the leading figures associated with the British Pop Art movement. A movement that ran independent of and concurrent to the American pop art of Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein and James Rosenquist. Making use of his previous experience as a carpenter and joiner, Tilson produced wooden reliefs and constructions as well as prints and paintings. As a student at the RCA Tilson associated with Frank Auerbach, Leon Kossoff, R. B. Kitaj, Peter Blake, Allen Jones, Patrick Caulfield and David Hockney. His first one-man show was held at the Marlborough Gallery, London in 1962. In 1977 he joined the Waddington Galleries and also exhibited at the Alan Cristea Gallery and the Giò Marconi Galleries in Milan. Tilson's work gained an international reputation when shown at the XXXII Venice Biennale in 1964, which led to a retrospective at the Boymans Museum, Rotterdam in 1964. Further retrospective exhibitions followed at the Vancouver Art Gallery in 1979 and the Arnolfini Gallery, Bristol in 1984. Growing disillusionment with the consumer society led to a change in Tilson work in the 1970s. After moving to Wiltshire in 1972, Tilson began to use a wider variety of materials, including stone, straw and rope in an effort to transcend time and culture by drawing on the motifs of pre-Classical mythology. This body of work was called Alchera. Tilson's work has been exhibited regularly in solo shows throughout the world: Cortona Centro Culturale Fontanella Borghese, Rome (1990), Plymouth City Museum (1991), Palazzo Pubblico, Siena (1995), Mestna Gallery, Ljubljana (1996) and Galleria Comunale d'Arte, Cesena (2000). Recently a major retrospective was held at the Royal Academy of Arts, London (2002). Among Tilson's awards are the Gulbenkian Foundation Prize (1960) and the Grand Prix d'Honneur, Biennale of Ljubljana (1996). He is a Royal Academician and his career was celebrated with a retrospective exhibition in 2002 at the Royal Academy 'Joe Tilson: Pop to Present' (Sackler Galleries) from April 2002. Invited to paint the banner for the "Palio", Siena in 1996 He is represented by Marlborough Fine Art, London and Alan Cristea Gallery, London. He was elected an Associate of the Royal Academy (ARA) in 1985 and a full Royal Academician (RA) in 1991.His work is amongst the finest of modern British printmaking alongside richard smith, alan davie, terry frost, and howard hodgkin. Tilson's solo exhibitions include: 2013 Marlborough Fine Art, London. Joe Tilson : A Survey 2012–13 University of Ljubljana 2012 Bugno Art Gallery, Venice 2009 Alan Cristea Gallery, London 2008 Bugno Art Gallery, Venice 2007 Waddington Galleries, London 2006 Palazzo Doria, Loano (retrospective) Menhir Arte Contemporanea, La Spezia 2004 Beaux Arts Gallery, London 2002 Royal Academy of Arts, London (retrospective) Alan Cristea Gallery, London (prints) Beaux Arts Gallery, London 2001 Castelbasso, Abruzzo (retrospective) Giò Marconi Gallery, Milan (retrospective) 1999–2000 Palazzo Pubblico, Siena, touring to Galleria Comunale d'Arte, Cesena and Pinacoteca Civica, Follonica 1999 Peter Guyther Gallery, London Theo Waddington, Boca Raton, Florida Castello Doria, Portovenere 1998 Theo Waddington Fine Art, London Marino alla Scala, Milan 1997 Cankarjev Dom, Ljubljana (prints retrospective) 1996 Annandale Galleries, Sydney Mestna Gallery, Ljubljana 1995 Westend Galerie, Frankfurt Palazzo Pubblico, Siena Theo Waddington Fine Art, London Alan Cristea Gallery, London 1994 Pinacoteca, Macerata Galleria Rotta, Genova 1993 Multimedia, Brescia Giò Marconi, Milan Cooperativa Ceramica d'Imola Heter A Hunermann Galerie GmbH, Düsseldorf 1992 Extra Moenia, Todi Waddington Graphics, London Waddington Galleries, London 1991 Plymouth City Museum Tour Fromage, Aosta Galerie Inge Baecker, Cologne 1990 Centro Culturale Fontanella Borghese, Rome Fortezza Medicea, Cortona 1984 Arnolfini Gallery, Bristol (retrospective) 1979 Vancouver Art Gallery (prints retrospective) 1978 Tate Gallery, London (prints) 1976 Marlborough Fine Art, Marlborough Graphics, London 1971 Museum Boijmans van Beuningen, Rotterdam (retrospective) touring to Belgium and Italy Waddington Galleries, London 1970 Marlborough New London Gallery, London 1968 Galleria Ferrari, Verona Galleria de Foscherari, Bologna Galerie Brusberg, Hanover 1967 Galleria del Naviglio, Milan Marlborough Galleria d'Arte, Rome 1966 Marlborough New London Gallery, London 1965 Kunstamt Reinickendorf, Berlin Stadt Museum, Recklinghausen Kunstverein, Braunschweig Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam 1964 Marlborough New London Gallery, London British Pavilion, XXXII Venice Biennale Modern Galerija, Zagreb 1963 Hatton Gallery, Newcastle upon Tyne Ferens Art Gallery, Hull Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool University Art Gallery, Nottingham 1962 Marlborough New London Gallery Public collections Tilson's art is held in collections internationally including the Tate Gallery, London; MoMA, New York and the Stedelijk, Amsterdam. Arts Council England, London Boijmans van Beuningen Museum, Rotterdam British Council, London British Library, London Galleria Nazionale d'Arte Moderna, Rome Kunsthalle, Basel Kunstmuseum, Hannover Museo de Arte, São Paulo Museu de Arte Moderna, Sintra Museum of Art, Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh Museum of Contemporary Art, Tehran Museum of Modern Art, New York Peter Stuyvesant Foundation, Amsterdam South African National Gallery, Cape Town Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam Tate, London Victoria & Albert Museum, London Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool Yale Center for British Art, New Haven
  • Creator:
    Joe Tilson (1928, British)
  • Creation Year:
    c.1975
  • Dimensions:
    Height: 39 in (99.06 cm)Width: 27.5 in (69.85 cm)
  • Medium:
  • Movement & Style:
  • Period:
  • Condition:
    good. minor wear. creasing lower right corner. please see photos. should mat out OK,.
  • Gallery Location:
    Surfside, FL
  • Reference Number:
    1stDibs: LU38211765782
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  • The Fabulous Moolah, World Champion Female Wrestler Figurative Screen Print
    Located in Soquel, CA
    The Fabulous Moolah, World Champion Female Wrestler Figurative Screen Print Modern figurative print of world champion female wrestler Mary Lillian Ellison (American, 1923-2007), also known as The Fabulous Moolah. The artist of this print is unknown. Unsigned and undated. Presented in a modern frame with Plexiglass. Image size: 26”H x 20L". During her lifetime, Moolah was lauded as a leading figure in women's professional wrestling and was considered one of the industry's greatest wrestlers. Moolah's first World Championship reign lasted over ten years. Moolah successfully defended the belt against the top female wrestlers in the world, such as Judy Grable and Donna Christanello, while also purporting to befriend some of the biggest celebrities of the day such as Elvis Presley and Jerry Lee Lewis. She became the first woman to be inducted into the WWF Hall of Fame in 1995. In 1999, she became the oldest champion in the history of professional wrestling when she won the Women's Championship for a final time at age 76 in 1999. Championships and Accomplishments: Cauliflower Alley Club Ladies Wrestling Award (1997) National Wrestling Alliance NWA Women's World Tag Team Championship (2 times) – with Toni Rose NWA World Women's Championship (5 times) NWA Hall of Fame (Class of 2012) Pro Wrestling...
    Category

    21st Century and Contemporary Pop Art Figurative Prints

    Materials

    Screen, Paper

  • POGANY rare 17 color 1960s British Pop silkscreen signed numbered edition of 70
    By Ronald Brooks Kitaj
    Located in New York, NY
    R.B. Kitaj POGANY, 1966 17 colour Screenprint and Photo-screenprint 24 × 36 inches Pencil signed and numbered from the Limited Edition of 70 Hand-signed by artist, Signed & numbered ...
    Category

    1960s Pop Art Abstract Prints

    Materials

    Screen, Pencil

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