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Samuel Chamberlain
'Soaring Steel' — 1920s Realism, Chicago Cityscape

1929

About the Item

Samuel Chamberlain, 'Soaring Steel', drypoint, 1929, edition 100, Chamberlain and Kingsland 79. Signed, titled, and numbered '64/100' in pencil. Annotated '48.00' in pencil, in the artist's hand, bottom right margin. A superb, finely-detailed impression, with selectively wiped plate tone, on heavy Rives cream wove paper; full margins (1 3/8 to 1 7/8 inches), in excellent condition. Matted to museum standards, unframed. The subject of the print is the construction of the Daily News Building in Chicago, Illinois. Image size 12 1/4 x 9 1/2 inches (311 x 241 mm); sheet size 15 1/2 x 12 3/8 inches (394 x 314 mm). Impressions of this work are held in the collections of the Art Institute of Chicago, Boston Public Library, Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, Museum of Modern Art, New York Public Library, University of Michigan Museum of Art, Smithsonian American Art Museum, and the Western Australia Museum. ABOUT THE ARTIST 'There is something about the atmospheric vibrancy of an etching which imparts a peculiar and irresistible life to architectural drawing...A copper plate offers receptive ground to the meticulously detailed drawing which so often appeals to the architect'. —Samuel Chamberlain, from the Catalogue Raisonné of his prints. Samuel V. Chamberlain (1896 - 1975), printmaker, photographer, author, and teacher, was born in Iowa. His family moved to Aberdeen, Washington in 1901, and in 1913, Chamberlain enrolled in the University of Washington in Seattle, where he studied architecture under Carl Gould. By 1915, he was enrolled in the School of Architecture of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Boston. With the United States' involvement in the First World War, Chamberlain sailed to France, where he volunteered in the American Field Service. In 1918, he was transferred to the United States Army to complete his tour of duty. After the war, he returned to Boston and resumed his architectural studies, which he eventually discontinued, working for a few years as a commercial artist. Chamberlain received the American Field Service Scholarship in 1923, which he used to travel to Spain, North Africa, and Italy. In 1924 he was living in Paris, where he studied lithography with Gaston Dorfinant and etching and drypoint with Edouard Léon, publishing his first etching the following year. In 1927, he studied drypoint with Malcolm Osborne at the Royal College of Art in London. He went on to teach part-time at the School of Architecture, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and the School of Architecture, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, between his travels abroad. Chamberlain eventually lived in France for twelve years. He authored, and sometimes co-authored, with his wife Narcissa, Domestic Architecture of Rural France, Clementine in the Kitchen, New England Rooms 1639-1863, and Charleston Interiors. His illustrations and etchings were published in American Architect, Architecture, World Traveler, Pencil Points, Journal of the American Institute of Architects, Century Magazine, Arts and Decoration, House and Garden, The Architectural Record, and the Magazine Section of the New York Times. Chamberlain was a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Institute of Architects, the American Society of the French Legion of Honor, the Boston Camera Club, the Boston Printmakers, the Chicago Society of Etchers, the Photographic Society of America, the Print Club of Albany, and the Society of American Etchers. He was elected an Academician to the National Academy of Design. Chamberlian’s graphic work is represented in many museum and public collections, including the Art Institute of Chicago, Auckland Art Gallery (New Zealand), Carnegie Museum of Art, Harvard Art Museums, Library of Congress, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Museum, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Minneapolis Institute of Art, Museum of Fine Arts Boston, Museum of Fine Arts in Houston, National Academy Museum, National Gallery of Art, Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, New York Public Library, Philadelphia Museum of Art, and the Smithsonian American Art Museum.
  • Creator:
    Samuel Chamberlain (1895-1975, American)
  • Creation Year:
    1929
  • Dimensions:
    Height: 12.25 in (31.12 cm)Width: 9.5 in (24.13 cm)
  • Medium:
  • Movement & Style:
  • Period:
  • Condition:
  • Gallery Location:
    Myrtle Beach, SC
  • Reference Number:
    Seller: 1033961stDibs: LU532313162142
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