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Paul von Ringelheim
Bust of a Man, Sculpture by Paul von Ringelheim

circa 1970

About the Item

Artist: Paul Von Ringleheim, Austrian/American (1933 - 2003) Title: Bust - II Year: Circa 1970 Medium: Painted Plaster Size: 26 x 11 x 15.5 inches
  • Creator:
    Paul von Ringelheim (American, Austrian)
  • Creation Year:
    circa 1970
  • Dimensions:
    Height: 29.5 in (74.93 cm)Width: 13 in (33.02 cm)Depth: 17.5 in (44.45 cm)
  • Medium:
  • Movement & Style:
  • Period:
  • Condition:
  • Gallery Location:
    Long Island City, NY
  • Reference Number:
    1stDibs: LU4663897092
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