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Maison Gripoix Jewelry & Watches

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Creator: Maison Gripoix
Dealer: Stazia Loren
Vintage Maison Gripoix Faux Pearl with Red, Green Chartreuse Beads, circa 1980s
By Maison Gripoix
Located in New York, NY
Vintage Gripoix Faux Pearl with Red, Green and Chartreuse Beads on a Gold Chain. The Pearls all have these varying shades of beads stuck through them and they all move easily. There...
Category

1980s French Artist Vintage Maison Gripoix Jewelry & Watches

Materials

Gold Plate

Maison Gripoix Vintage Faux Turquoise and White Dangling Earrings Circa 1980s
By Maison Gripoix
Located in New York, NY
Maison Gripoix Vintage Faux Turquoise and White Small Dangling Earrings Set in Gold Tone. There are small pieces of Faux Turquoise wrapped in Gold surrounding a white center. Clip On. These are so stunning and so classic in the style of Chanel. These can be worn in the winter as well as the summer. I just love these. Truly my taste. Guy de Maupassant wrote a famous story about a necklace. The story is about a young, pretty, intelligent, well educated but poorly endowed bride who has to marry a petty official; and thus suffering from the limitations of living a life with a husband that lacked any exquisite qualities. In order to entertain his dejected spouse, one day her husband gets an invitation to a ball and gives his wife 400 francs he had saved for a hunting rifle so that she would be able to order an appropriate dress. However, when the dress is ready it becomes clear that it is lacking jewelry; and it would be impossible to attend the ball while looking so poor. The protagonist approaches her rich childhood friend with whom she was raised together at the monastery and borrows a diamond necklace from her. The ball is a great success and she is the centre of attention. However when the woman returns home, she discovers that she has lost the necklace. In order to conceal her faux pas from her friend, she buys a new necklace identical to the one she lost, and to pay it off the woman gets into a huge debt which over the years gradually drags her down the social ladder from bourgeoisie to poverty. Ten years later, having lost her good looks, the woman encounters her friend on the Champs Elysees, who still looks young, beautiful and rich. The protagonist reveals to her friend the whole story about the necklace, but her friend replies in amazement that the diamonds were fake and would “cost 500 francs at most”. Maison Gripoix starts out with a dramatic story. In 1869 (or a year earlier, according to other sources), Paris master glass-maker Augustina Gripoix began making replicas of pearls and crystals; casting glass into different shapes and colours and inserting them into most sophisticated settings. She used the pâte de verre (glass paste) technique, whereby a traditional ceramic or qypsum form was filled with a multi-colour pieces of glass and special gluing substances and then baked in a furnace, resulting in objects featuring fantastical hues. Only Augustina made her crystals by pouring the melted glass paste into the press moulds skipping the furnace step, allowing her to achieve the purity of colour, transparency and shine. She found a simple method to make beautiful jewelry and thus Marquises, Duchesses and Princesses qued up ... so Madame Gripoix would make them replicas of their own jewelry in case of robbery or loss, or some unusual jewelry pieces for their new wraps, neckpieces, or boas. The so-called ‘costume jewelry’ emerged to a large extent thanks to the work of Maison Gripoix. Augustina Gripoix earned her fame in the 1890’s when she started making necklaces for Sarah Bernhardt to wear on stage; and later the costume jewelry for the first high fashion house of Charles Frederick Worth. Later on, Paul Poiret, the leading couturier of the 1910’s contacted her and she created sophisticated oriental style jewelry for him to match his famous oriental costumes based on the aesthetic of Diaghilev’s initial Russian seasons. The value of costume jewelry was now being recognized in its own right; and not just for imitation purposes. The taste of emancipated young girls, who were gaining more and more freedom and opportunities, was best met with bijouterie. So in the 1920, when Augustina’s daughter Susan became the head of the House; Gripoix prospects became even more exciting. Girls with short-cropped hair in short dresses zoomed by in open-top cars wearing bijou rather than diamonds. Everyone ordered bijouterie from Madam Gripoix during this period, from Jeanne Lanvin to Jean Piguet...
Category

1980s French Artist Vintage Maison Gripoix Jewelry & Watches

Materials

Mixed Metal

Vintage Maison Gripoix White, Crystal, Faux Turquoise Gold Necklace Circa 1990s
By Maison Gripoix
Located in New York, NY
Vintage Maison Gripoix White, Crystal and Faux Turquoise on Gold Chain Necklace. 3 Different Emblems On Gold Chain with Dangling White Piece in the Middle. 22"-24" L. Dangling Middle is 3" L. Each Piece is 2" by 2" Guy de Maupassant wrote a famous story about a necklace. The story is about a young, pretty, intelligent, well educated but poorly endowed bride who has to marry a petty official; and thus suffering from the limitations of living a life with a husband that lacked any exquisite qualities. In order to entertain his dejected spouse, one day her husband gets an invitation to a ball and gives his wife 400 francs he had saved for a hunting rifle so that she would be able to order an appropriate dress. However, when the dress is ready it becomes clear that it is lacking jewelry; and it would be impossible to attend the ball while looking so poor. The protagonist approaches her rich childhood friend with whom she was raised together at the monastery and borrows a diamond necklace from her. The ball is a great success and she is the centre of attention. However when the woman returns home, she discovers that she has lost the necklace. In order to conceal her faux pas from her friend, she buys a new necklace identical to the one she lost, and to pay it off the woman gets into a huge debt which over the years gradually drags her down the social ladder from bourgeoisie to poverty. Ten years later, having lost her good looks, the woman encounters her friend on the Champs Elysees, who still looks young, beautiful and rich. The protagonist reveals to her friend the whole story about the necklace, but her friend replies in amazement that the diamonds were fake and would “cost 500 francs at most”. Maison Gripoix starts out with a dramatic story. In 1869 (or a year earlier, according to other sources), Paris master glass-maker Augustina Gripoix began making replicas of pearls and crystals; casting glass into different shapes and colours and inserting them into most sophisticated settings. She used the pâte de verre (glass paste) technique, whereby a traditional ceramic or qypsum form was filled with a multi-colour pieces of glass and special gluing substances and then baked in a furnace, resulting in objects featuring fantastical hues. Only Augustina made her crystals by pouring the melted glass paste into the press moulds skipping the furnace step, allowing her to achieve the purity of colour, transparency and shine. She found a simple method to make beautiful jewelry and thus Marquises, Duchesses and Princesses qued up ... so Madame Gripoix would make them replicas of their own jewelry in case of robbery or loss, or some unusual jewelry pieces for their new wraps, neckpieces, or boas. The so-called ‘costume jewelry’ emerged to a large extent thanks to the work of Maison Gripoix. Augustina Gripoix earned her fame in the 1890’s when she started making necklaces for Sarah Bernhardt to wear on stage; and later the costume jewelry for the first high fashion house of Charles Frederick Worth. Later on, Paul Poiret, the leading couturier of the 1910’s contacted her and she created sophisticated oriental style jewelry for him to match his famous oriental costumes based on the aesthetic of Diaghilev’s initial Russian seasons. The value of costume jewelry was now being recognized in its own right; and not just for imitation purposes. The taste of emancipated young girls, who were gaining more and more freedom and opportunities, was best met with bijouterie. So in the 1920, when Augustina’s daughter Susan became the head of the House; Gripoix prospects became even more exciting. Girls with short-cropped hair in short dresses zoomed by in open-top cars wearing bijou rather than diamonds. Everyone ordered bijouterie from Madam Gripoix during this period, from Jeanne Lanvin to Jean Piguet...
Category

1990s French Artist Maison Gripoix Jewelry & Watches

Vintage Gripoix Translucent Pate De Verre Earrings Circa 1980s
By Maison Gripoix
Located in New York, NY
Vintage Gripoix Translucent Earrings with Pieces Of Gold. Dangling Earrings With Pieces of Gold and Stones. Long Necklace/Sautoir on Site to Match. So Gorgeous! This matches the necklace and sometimes when a set is matched it is magical and this translucent dangling pate de verre is one of them. Clip On. Guy de Maupassant wrote a famous story about a necklace. The story is about a young, pretty, intelligent, well educated but poorly endowed bride who has to marry a petty official; and thus suffering from the limitations of living a life with a husband that lacked any exquisite qualities. In order to entertain his dejected spouse, one day her husband gets an invitation to a ball and gives his wife 400 francs he had saved for a hunting rifle so that she would be able to order an appropriate dress. However, when the dress is ready it becomes clear that it is lacking jewelry; and it would be impossible to attend the ball while looking so poor. The protagonist approaches her rich childhood friend with whom she was raised together at the monastery and borrows a diamond necklace from her. The ball is a great success and she is the centre of attention. However when the woman returns home, she discovers that she has lost the necklace. In order to conceal her faux pas from her friend, she buys a new necklace identical to the one she lost, and to pay it off the woman gets into a huge debt which over the years gradually drags her down the social ladder from bourgeoisie to poverty. Ten years later, having lost her good looks, the woman encounters her friend on the Champs Elysees, who still looks young, beautiful and rich. The protagonist reveals to her friend the whole story about the necklace, but her friend replies in amazement that the diamonds were fake and would “cost 500 francs at most”. Maison Gripoix starts out with a dramatic story. In 1869 (or a year earlier, according to other sources), Paris master glass-maker Augustina Gripoix began making replicas of pearls and crystals; casting glass into different shapes and colours and inserting them into most sophisticated settings. She used the pâte de verre (glass paste) technique, whereby a traditional ceramic or qypsum form was filled with a multi-colour pieces of glass and special gluing substances and then baked in a furnace, resulting in objects featuring fantastical hues. Only Augustina made her crystals by pouring the melted glass paste into the press moulds skipping the furnace step, allowing her to achieve the purity of colour, transparency and shine. She found a simple method to make beautiful jewelry and thus Marquises, Duchesses and Princesses qued up ... so Madame Gripoix would make them replicas of their own jewelry in case of robbery or loss, or some unusual jewelry pieces for their new wraps, neckpieces, or boas. The so-called ‘costume jewelry’ emerged to a large extent thanks to the work of Maison Gripoix. Augustina Gripoix earned her fame in the 1890’s when she started making necklaces for Sarah Bernhardt to wear on stage; and later the costume jewelry for the first high fashion house of Charles Frederick Worth. Later on, Paul Poiret, the leading couturier of the 1910’s contacted her and she created sophisticated oriental style jewelry for him to match his famous oriental costumes based on the aesthetic of Diaghilev’s initial Russian seasons. The value of costume jewelry was now being recognized in its own right; and not just for imitation purposes. The taste of emancipated young girls, who were gaining more and more freedom and opportunities, was best met with bijouterie. So in the 1920, when Augustina’s daughter Susan became the head of the House; Gripoix prospects became even more exciting. Girls with short-cropped hair in short dresses zoomed by in open-top cars wearing bijou rather than diamonds. Everyone ordered bijouterie from Madam Gripoix during this period, from Jeanne Lanvin to Jean Piguet...
Category

1980s French Artist Vintage Maison Gripoix Jewelry & Watches

Materials

Mixed Metal

Maison Gripoix Vintage Blue, Green and Red Dangling Earrings Circa 1980s
By Maison Gripoix
Located in New York, NY
Maison Gripoix Vintage Blue, Green and Red Dangling Earrings. These will always look classic and in style. This look never leaves the mood board. ...
Category

1980s French Artist Vintage Maison Gripoix Jewelry & Watches

Materials

Mixed Metal

Maison Gripoix Vintage Blue and Light Blue Flower Dangling Earrings Circa 1980s
By Maison Gripoix
Located in New York, NY
Maison Gripoix Vintage Blue and Light Blue Flower Dangling Earrings Set in Gold Tone Clip On. Always In Style. Very Classic Chic. These are so spectacular. I have them in red as well. The price is different as they were purchased in different exchange rates. These are really stunning. Will never go out of style!! Guy de Maupassant wrote a famous story about a necklace. The story is about a young, pretty, intelligent, well educated but poorly endowed bride who has to marry a petty official; and thus suffering from the limitations of living a life with a husband that lacked any exquisite qualities. In order to entertain his dejected spouse, one day her husband gets an invitation to a ball and gives his wife 400 francs he had saved for a hunting rifle so that she would be able to order an appropriate dress. However, when the dress is ready it becomes clear that it is lacking jewelry; and it would be impossible to attend the ball while looking so poor. The protagonist approaches her rich childhood friend with whom she was raised together at the monastery and borrows a diamond necklace from her. The ball is a great success and she is the centre of attention. However when the woman returns home, she discovers that she has lost the necklace. In order to conceal her faux pas from her friend, she buys a new necklace identical to the one she lost, and to pay it off the woman gets into a huge debt which over the years gradually drags her down the social ladder from bourgeoisie to poverty. Ten years later, having lost her good looks, the woman encounters her friend on the Champs Elysees, who still looks young, beautiful and rich. The protagonist reveals to her friend the whole story about the necklace, but her friend replies in amazement that the diamonds were fake and would “cost 500 francs at most”. Maison Gripoix starts out with a dramatic story. In 1869 (or a year earlier, according to other sources), Paris master glass-maker Augustina Gripoix began making replicas of pearls and crystals; casting glass into different shapes and colours and inserting them into most sophisticated settings. She used the pâte de verre (glass paste) technique, whereby a traditional ceramic or qypsum form was filled with a multi-colour pieces of glass and special gluing substances and then baked in a furnace, resulting in objects featuring fantastical hues. Only Augustina made her crystals by pouring the melted glass paste into the press moulds skipping the furnace step, allowing her to achieve the purity of colour, transparency and shine. She found a simple method to make beautiful jewelry and thus Marquises, Duchesses and Princesses qued up ... so Madame Gripoix would make them replicas of their own jewelry in case of robbery or loss, or some unusual jewelry pieces for their new wraps, neckpieces, or boas. The so-called ‘costume jewelry’ emerged to a large extent thanks to the work of Maison Gripoix. Augustina Gripoix earned her fame in the 1890’s when she started making necklaces for Sarah Bernhardt to wear on stage; and later the costume jewelry for the first high fashion house of Charles Frederick Worth. Later on, Paul Poiret, the leading couturier of the 1910’s contacted her and she created sophisticated oriental style jewelry for him to match his famous oriental costumes based on the aesthetic of Diaghilev’s initial Russian seasons. The value of costume jewelry was now being recognized in its own right; and not just for imitation purposes. The taste of emancipated young girls, who were gaining more and more freedom and opportunities, was best met with bijouterie. So in the 1920, when Augustina’s daughter Susan became the head of the House; Gripoix prospects became even more exciting. Girls with short-cropped hair in short dresses zoomed by in open-top cars wearing bijou rather than diamonds. Everyone ordered bijouterie from Madam Gripoix during this period, from Jeanne Lanvin to Jean Piguet...
Category

1980s French Artist Vintage Maison Gripoix Jewelry & Watches

Materials

Mixed Metal

Vintage Gripoix Paris Flower Necklace Circa 1980s
By Maison Gripoix
Located in New York, NY
Vintage Gripoix Red MDV Paris Flower Necklace. This necklace is so spectacular. The flower is like the Chanel Camelia. This just oozes class. Something about this is just so specia...
Category

1980s French Artist Vintage Maison Gripoix Jewelry & Watches

Materials

Mixed Metal

Maison Gripoix Vintage Faux Pearl and Red Dangling Earrings Circa 1980s
By Maison Gripoix
Located in New York, NY
Maison Gripoix Vintage Faux Pearl and Red Dangling Earrings. Wrapped in woven gold around the Pearl in the typical 1980s style of Chanel. Clip on. So classic and you always look good no matter what you are wearing when you have these on. Clip on. Very much the colors of Chanel. Guy de Maupassant wrote a famous story about a necklace. The story is about a young, pretty, intelligent, well educated but poorly endowed bride who has to marry a petty official; and thus suffering from the limitations of living a life with a husband that lacked any exquisite qualities. In order to entertain his dejected spouse, one day her husband gets an invitation to a ball and gives his wife 400 francs he had saved for a hunting rifle so that she would be able to order an appropriate dress. However, when the dress is ready it becomes clear that it is lacking jewelry; and it would be impossible to attend the ball while looking so poor. The protagonist approaches her rich childhood friend with whom she was raised together at the monastery and borrows a diamond necklace from her. The ball is a great success and she is the centre of attention. However when the woman returns home, she discovers that she has lost the necklace. In order to conceal her faux pas from her friend, she buys a new necklace identical to the one she lost, and to pay it off the woman gets into a huge debt which over the years gradually drags her down the social ladder from bourgeoisie to poverty. Ten years later, having lost her good looks, the woman encounters her friend on the Champs Elysees, who still looks young, beautiful and rich. The protagonist reveals to her friend the whole story about the necklace, but her friend replies in amazement that the diamonds were fake and would “cost 500 francs at most”. Maison Gripoix starts out with a dramatic story. In 1869 (or a year earlier, according to other sources), Paris master glass-maker Augustina Gripoix began making replicas of pearls and crystals; casting glass into different shapes and colours and inserting them into most sophisticated settings. She used the pâte de verre (glass paste) technique, whereby a traditional ceramic or qypsum form was filled with a multi-colour pieces of glass and special gluing substances and then baked in a furnace, resulting in objects featuring fantastical hues. Only Augustina made her crystals by pouring the melted glass paste into the press moulds skipping the furnace step, allowing her to achieve the purity of colour, transparency and shine. She found a simple method to make beautiful jewelry and thus Marquises, Duchesses and Princesses qued up ... so Madame Gripoix would make them replicas of their own jewelry in case of robbery or loss, or some unusual jewelry pieces for their new wraps, neckpieces, or boas. The so-called ‘costume jewelry’ emerged to a large extent thanks to the work of Maison Gripoix. Augustina Gripoix earned her fame in the 1890’s when she started making necklaces for Sarah Bernhardt to wear on stage; and later the costume jewelry for the first high fashion house of Charles Frederick Worth. Later on, Paul Poiret, the leading couturier of the 1910’s contacted her and she created sophisticated oriental style jewelry for him to match his famous oriental costumes based on the aesthetic of Diaghilev’s initial Russian seasons. The value of costume jewelry was now being recognized in its own right; and not just for imitation purposes. The taste of emancipated young girls, who were gaining more and more freedom and opportunities, was best met with bijouterie. So in the 1920, when Augustina’s daughter Susan became the head of the House; Gripoix prospects became even more exciting. Girls with short-cropped hair in short dresses zoomed by in open-top cars wearing bijou rather than diamonds. Everyone ordered bijouterie from Madam Gripoix during this period, from Jeanne Lanvin to Jean Piguet...
Category

1980s French Artist Vintage Maison Gripoix Jewelry & Watches

Materials

Mixed Metal

Maison Gripoix Vintage White and Purple Dangling Earrings Circa 1980s
By Maison Gripoix
Located in New York, NY
Maison Gripoix Vintage White and Light Purple Dangling Earrings. These will always be in style. The Chanel look has never left. It is classic and timeless and says class. It is an elevated look. No matter what you wear these will look right. A Chanel suit or jeans and a white t shirt with a blazer. You look stunning and done. These are all you need. Clip on. This look will always walk down the Chanel runway in one form or another. I will send you velcro dots to hold them on and you can do cartwheels in these earrings. The models in Paris wear them and you can easily go 20 hours. Just remind me. Guy de Maupassant wrote a famous story about a necklace. The story is about a young, pretty, intelligent, well educated but poorly endowed bride who has to marry a petty official; and thus suffering from the limitations of living a life with a husband that lacked any exquisite qualities. In order to entertain his dejected spouse, one day her husband gets an invitation to a ball and gives his wife 400 francs he had saved for a hunting rifle so that she would be able to order an appropriate dress. However, when the dress is ready it becomes clear that it is lacking jewelry; and it would be impossible to attend the ball while looking so poor. The protagonist approaches her rich childhood friend with whom she was raised together at the monastery and borrows a diamond necklace from her. The ball is a great success and she is the centre of attention. However when the woman returns home, she discovers that she has lost the necklace. In order to conceal her faux pas from her friend, she buys a new necklace identical to the one she lost, and to pay it off the woman gets into a huge debt which over the years gradually drags her down the social ladder from bourgeoisie to poverty. Ten years later, having lost her good looks, the woman encounters her friend on the Champs Elysees, who still looks young, beautiful and rich. The protagonist reveals to her friend the whole story about the necklace, but her friend replies in amazement that the diamonds were fake and would “cost 500 francs at most”. Maison Gripoix starts out with a dramatic story. In 1869 (or a year earlier, according to other sources), Paris master glass-maker Augustina Gripoix began making replicas of pearls and crystals; casting glass into different shapes and colours and inserting them into most sophisticated settings. She used the pâte de verre (glass paste) technique, whereby a traditional ceramic or qypsum form was filled with a multi-colour pieces of glass and special gluing substances and then baked in a furnace, resulting in objects featuring fantastical hues. Only Augustina made her crystals by pouring the melted glass paste into the press moulds skipping the furnace step, allowing her to achieve the purity of colour, transparency and shine. She found a simple method to make beautiful jewelry and thus Marquises, Duchesses and Princesses qued up ... so Madame Gripoix would make them replicas of their own jewelry in case of robbery or loss, or some unusual jewelry pieces for their new wraps, neckpieces, or boas. The so-called ‘costume jewelry’ emerged to a large extent thanks to the work of Maison Gripoix. Augustina Gripoix earned her fame in the 1890’s when she started making necklaces for Sarah Bernhardt to wear on stage; and later the costume jewelry for the first high fashion house of Charles Frederick Worth. Later on, Paul Poiret, the leading couturier of the 1910’s contacted her and she created sophisticated oriental style jewelry for him to match his famous oriental costumes based on the aesthetic of Diaghilev’s initial Russian seasons. The value of costume jewelry was now being recognized in its own right; and not just for imitation purposes. The taste of emancipated young girls, who were gaining more and more freedom and opportunities, was best met with bijouterie. So in the 1920, when Augustina’s daughter Susan became the head of the House; Gripoix prospects became even more exciting. Girls with short-cropped hair in short dresses zoomed by in open-top cars wearing bijou rather than diamonds. Everyone ordered bijouterie from Madam Gripoix during this period, from Jeanne Lanvin to Jean Piguet, but certainly the best relationship Gripoix had was with Gabriel Chanel. It is well-known that Chanel, a fan of large jewelry with large stones, made bijouterie super fashionable. Chanel brought copies of byzantine jewelry to Susanne Gripoix; and asked her to make the pieces in that same style, requesting: “Let everyone think that this jewelry is not new, but found somewhere on an excavation site nearby Rue Camborne”. She was so satisfied with the result of her order that she remained a faithful client of Gripoix for several decades. This was how the famous byzantine style of Chanel jewelry was brought to life, fancying golden Maltese crosses with large multicolor stones and matching bracelets; cabochons and massive brooches all of which have become a part of the Gripoix Chanel liked to combine both natural and imitation stones in one item, for example she would combine natural and imitation pearls in one necklace. Gripoix made them in such a way that it was impossible to tell the difference between the either of them. Susanne Gripoix made special irregular shape pearls from glass for Chanel; imitating the baroque pearls. They were enameled in her workshops with mother-of-pearl to obtain some of the soft shine characteristic of natural pearls . As the main Paris supplier to the couturier houses, Gripoix worked for many designers: from Cristobal Balenciaga, Pierre Balmain and Christian Dior to Yves Saint Laurent; and later for Christian Lacroix and Marc Jacobs. However it was the cooperation with Chanel that was the most significant, both for Chanel and for Gripoix. Today Gripoix is no longer a family affair/company but the House still makes jewelry, although the style has changed considerably over the last few years. The jewelry has become simpler, more graphical and even minimalistic. In 2011, however, Gripoix and Catherine Baba...
Category

1980s French Artist Vintage Maison Gripoix Jewelry & Watches

Materials

Mixed Metal

Vintage Maison Gripoix Faux Turquoise and White Dangling Earrings Circa 1980s
By Maison Gripoix
Located in New York, NY
Maison Gripoix Vintage Faux Turquoise and White Layered Dangling Earrings. There are three layers to this all wrapped around with an offset gold tone and then a long dangling piece. These are so stunning and look good with many colors. Clip On. These are true statement earrings in that they are so well made and one knows it is a special piece and not an off the rack piece. These can also be worn in the winter against dark colors. Guy de Maupassant wrote a famous story about a necklace. The story is about a young, pretty, intelligent, well educated but poorly endowed bride who has to marry a petty official; and thus suffering from the limitations of living a life with a husband that lacked any exquisite qualities. In order to entertain his dejected spouse, one day her husband gets an invitation to a ball and gives his wife 400 francs he had saved for a hunting rifle so that she would be able to order an appropriate dress. However, when the dress is ready it becomes clear that it is lacking jewelry; and it would be impossible to attend the ball while looking so poor. The protagonist approaches her rich childhood friend with whom she was raised together at the monastery and borrows a diamond necklace from her. The ball is a great success and she is the centre of attention. However when the woman returns home, she discovers that she has lost the necklace. In order to conceal her faux pas from her friend, she buys a new necklace identical to the one she lost, and to pay it off the woman gets into a huge debt which over the years gradually drags her down the social ladder from bourgeoisie to poverty. Ten years later, having lost her good looks, the woman encounters her friend on the Champs Elysees, who still looks young, beautiful and rich. The protagonist reveals to her friend the whole story about the necklace, but her friend replies in amazement that the diamonds were fake and would “cost 500 francs at most”. Maison Gripoix starts out with a dramatic story. In 1869 (or a year earlier, according to other sources), Paris master glass-maker Augustina Gripoix began making replicas of pearls and crystals; casting glass into different shapes and colours and inserting them into most sophisticated settings. She used the pâte de verre (glass paste) technique, whereby a traditional ceramic or qypsum form was filled with a multi-colour pieces of glass and special gluing substances and then baked in a furnace, resulting in objects featuring fantastical hues. Only Augustina made her crystals by pouring the melted glass paste into the press moulds skipping the furnace step, allowing her to achieve the purity of colour, transparency and shine. She found a simple method to make beautiful jewelry and thus Marquises, Duchesses and Princesses qued up ... so Madame Gripoix would make them replicas of their own jewelry in case of robbery or loss, or some unusual jewelry pieces for their new wraps, neckpieces, or boas. The so-called ‘costume jewelry’ emerged to a large extent thanks to the work of Maison Gripoix. Augustina Gripoix earned her fame in the 1890’s when she started making necklaces for Sarah Bernhardt to wear on stage; and later the costume jewelry for the first high fashion house of Charles Frederick Worth. Later on, Paul Poiret, the leading couturier of the 1910’s contacted her and she created sophisticated oriental style jewelry for him to match his famous oriental costumes based on the aesthetic of Diaghilev’s initial Russian seasons. The value of costume jewelry was now being recognized in its own right; and not just for imitation purposes. The taste of emancipated young girls, who were gaining more and more freedom and opportunities, was best met with bijouterie. So in the 1920, when Augustina’s daughter Susan became the head of the House; Gripoix prospects became even more exciting. Girls with short-cropped hair in short dresses zoomed by in open-top cars wearing bijou rather than diamonds. Everyone ordered bijouterie from Madam Gripoix during this period, from Jeanne Lanvin to Jean Piguet...
Category

1980s French Artist Vintage Maison Gripoix Jewelry & Watches

Materials

Mixed Metal

Maison Gripoix Vintage Red and Green Flower Dangling Earrings Circa 1980s
By Maison Gripoix
Located in New York, NY
Maison Gripoix Vintage Red and Green Flower Dangling Earrings Set in Gold Tone. These are some of the most gorgeous earrings I have in the collection. The colors of course and the way they are made. They are just special. They will always be relevant. They are well made and make a statement. They are just classy and chic. Clip On. Always In Style. Clip on. I also have them in blue. They are slightly less in price due to exchange rate at time of purchase. Acquired in Paris. Guy de Maupassant wrote a famous story about a necklace. The story is about a young, pretty, intelligent, well educated but poorly endowed bride who has to marry a petty official; and thus suffering from the limitations of living a life with a husband that lacked any exquisite qualities. In order to entertain his dejected spouse, one day her husband gets an invitation to a ball and gives his wife 400 francs he had saved for a hunting rifle so that she would be able to order an appropriate dress. However, when the dress is ready it becomes clear that it is lacking jewelry; and it would be impossible to attend the ball while looking so poor. The protagonist approaches her rich childhood friend with whom she was raised together at the monastery and borrows a diamond necklace from her. The ball is a great success and she is the centre of attention. However when the woman returns home, she discovers that she has lost the necklace. In order to conceal her faux pas from her friend, she buys a new necklace identical to the one she lost, and to pay it off the woman gets into a huge debt which over the years gradually drags her down the social ladder from bourgeoisie to poverty. Ten years later, having lost her good looks, the woman encounters her friend on the Champs Elysees, who still looks young, beautiful and rich. The protagonist reveals to her friend the whole story about the necklace, but her friend replies in amazement that the diamonds were fake and would “cost 500 francs at most”. Maison Gripoix starts out with a dramatic story. In 1869 (or a year earlier, according to other sources), Paris master glass-maker Augustina Gripoix began making replicas of pearls and crystals; casting glass into different shapes and colours and inserting them into most sophisticated settings. She used the pâte de verre (glass paste) technique, whereby a traditional ceramic or qypsum form was filled with a multi-colour pieces of glass and special gluing substances and then baked in a furnace, resulting in objects featuring fantastical hues. Only Augustina made her crystals by pouring the melted glass paste into the press moulds skipping the furnace step, allowing her to achieve the purity of colour, transparency and shine. She found a simple method to make beautiful jewelry and thus Marquises, Duchesses and Princesses qued up ... so Madame Gripoix would make them replicas of their own jewelry in case of robbery or loss, or some unusual jewelry pieces for their new wraps, neckpieces, or boas. The so-called ‘costume jewelry’ emerged to a large extent thanks to the work of Maison Gripoix. Augustina Gripoix earned her fame in the 1890’s when she started making necklaces for Sarah Bernhardt to wear on stage; and later the costume jewelry for the first high fashion house of Charles Frederick Worth. Later on, Paul Poiret, the leading couturier of the 1910’s contacted her and she created sophisticated oriental style jewelry for him to match his famous oriental costumes based on the aesthetic of Diaghilev’s initial Russian seasons. The value of costume jewelry was now being recognized in its own right; and not just for imitation purposes. The taste of emancipated young girls, who were gaining more and more freedom and opportunities, was best met with bijouterie. So in the 1920, when Augustina’s daughter Susan became the head of the House; Gripoix prospects became even more exciting. Girls with short-cropped hair in short dresses zoomed by in open-top cars wearing bijou rather than diamonds. Everyone ordered bijouterie from Madam Gripoix during this period, from Jeanne Lanvin to Jean Piguet, but certainly the best relationship Gripoix had was with Gabriel Chanel. It is well-known that Chanel, a fan of large jewelry with large stones, made bijouterie super fashionable. Chanel brought copies of byzantine jewelry to Susanne Gripoix; and asked her to make the pieces in that same style, requesting: “Let everyone think that this jewelry is not new, but found somewhere on an excavation site nearby Rue Camborne”. She was so satisfied with the result of her order that she remained a faithful client of Gripoix for several decades. This was how the famous byzantine style of Chanel jewelry was brought to life, fancying golden Maltese crosses with large multicolor stones and matching bracelets; cabochons and massive brooches all of which have become a part of the Gripoix Chanel liked to combine both natural and imitation stones in one item, for example she would combine natural and imitation pearls in one necklace. Gripoix made them in such a way that it was impossible to tell the difference between the either of them. Susanne Gripoix made special irregular shape pearls from glass for Chanel; imitating the baroque pearls. They were enameled in her workshops with mother-of-pearl to obtain some of the soft shine characteristic of natural pearls . As the main Paris supplier to the couturier houses, Gripoix worked for many designers: from Cristobal Balenciaga, Pierre Balmain and Christian Dior to Yves Saint Laurent; and later for Christian Lacroix and Marc Jacobs. However it was the cooperation with Chanel that was the most significant, both for Chanel and for Gripoix. Today Gripoix is no longer a family affair/company but the House still makes jewelry, although the style has changed considerably over the last few years. The jewelry has become simpler, more graphical and even minimalistic. In 2011, however, Gripoix and Catherine Baba...
Category

1980s French Artist Vintage Maison Gripoix Jewelry & Watches

Materials

Mixed Metal

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1990s French Artist Maison Gripoix Jewelry & Watches

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Maison Gripoix Vintage Necklace Multi Color Dangling Pearl Necklace Circa 1990s
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Maison Gripoix Vintage Necklace with Multi Color Dangling Pearl. Pearl Necklace with Gripoix Disc in Gold Color with Dangling Pearl. If you needed this longer a jeweler could easily add gold chain to lengthen it. Guy de Maupassant wrote a famous story about a necklace. The story is about a young, pretty, intelligent, well educated but poorly endowed bride who has to marry a petty official; and thus suffering from the limitations of living a life with a husband that lacked any exquisite qualities. In order to entertain his dejected spouse, one day her husband gets an invitation to a ball and gives his wife 400 francs he had saved for a hunting rifle so that she would be able to order an appropriate dress. However, when the dress is ready it becomes clear that it is lacking jewelry; and it would be impossible to attend the ball while looking so poor. The protagonist approaches her rich childhood friend with whom she was raised together at the monastery and borrows a diamond necklace from her. The ball is a great success and she is the centre of attention. However when the woman returns home, she discovers that she has lost the necklace. In order to conceal her faux pas from her friend, she buys a new necklace identical to the one she lost, and to pay it off the woman gets into a huge debt which over the years gradually drags her down the social ladder from bourgeoisie to poverty. Ten years later, having lost her good looks, the woman encounters her friend on the Champs Elysees, who still looks young, beautiful and rich. The protagonist reveals to her friend the whole story about the necklace, but her friend replies in amazement that the diamonds were fake and would “cost 500 francs at most”. Maison Gripoix starts out with a dramatic story. In 1869 (or a year earlier, according to other sources), Paris master glass-maker Augustina Gripoix began making replicas of pearls and crystals; casting glass into different shapes and colours and inserting them into most sophisticated settings. She used the pâte de verre (glass paste) technique, whereby a traditional ceramic or qypsum form was filled with a multi-colour pieces of glass and special gluing substances and then baked in a furnace, resulting in objects featuring fantastical hues. Only Augustina made her crystals by pouring the melted glass paste into the press moulds skipping the furnace step, allowing her to achieve the purity of colour, transparency and shine. She found a simple method to make beautiful jewelry and thus Marquises, Duchesses and Princesses qued up ... so Madame Gripoix would make them replicas of their own jewelry in case of robbery or loss, or some unusual jewelry pieces for their new wraps, neckpieces, or boas. The so-called ‘costume jewelry’ emerged to a large extent thanks to the work of Maison Gripoix. Augustina Gripoix earned her fame in the 1890’s when she started making necklaces for Sarah Bernhardt to wear on stage; and later the costume jewelry for the first high fashion house of Charles Frederick Worth. Later on, Paul Poiret, the leading couturier of the 1910’s contacted her and she created sophisticated oriental style jewelry for him to match his famous oriental costumes based on the aesthetic of Diaghilev’s initial Russian seasons. The value of costume jewelry was now being recognized in its own right; and not just for imitation purposes. The taste of emancipated young girls, who were gaining more and more freedom and opportunities, was best met with bijouterie. So in the 1920, when Augustina’s daughter Susan became the head of the House; Gripoix prospects became even more exciting. Girls with short-cropped hair in short dresses zoomed by in open-top cars wearing bijou rather than diamonds. Everyone ordered bijouterie from Madam Gripoix during this period, from Jeanne Lanvin to Jean Piguet...
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1990s French Artist Maison Gripoix Jewelry & Watches

Materials

Mixed Metal

Maison Gripoix Vintage Flower Collar Necklace
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Located in New York, NY
VIntage Gripoix Gold Tone with Black and White Flowers Collar. It is a very classic style that will look good with a ballgown or on a t-shirt. Always c...
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1990s French Artist Maison Gripoix Jewelry & Watches

  • Maison Gripoix Vintage Flower Collar Necklace
  • Maison Gripoix Vintage Flower Collar Necklace
  • Maison Gripoix Vintage Flower Collar Necklace
  • Maison Gripoix Vintage Flower Collar Necklace
H 3 in W 2 in D 1.5 in Dm 20 in L 20 in
Maison Gripoix Cream Color Layered Brooch with Crystals
By Maison Gripoix
Located in New York, NY
Maison Gripoix Cream Color Layered Brooch with Crystals. 2" x 2" about 1" H. Looks Gorgeous Alone or on a strand of Pearls as a Lariat or a Choker. Many Ways to Wear this Beautifu...
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1980s French Vintage Maison Gripoix Jewelry & Watches

Maison Gripoix Vintage Faux Turquoise and White Dangling Earrings Circa 1980s
By Maison Gripoix
Located in New York, NY
Maison Gripoix Vintage Faux Turquoise and White Dangling Earrings set in Gold Tone. These just ooze class and style. They will always be in style. They look very Palm Beach or the Hamptons or the South of France or any amazing place that you can insert yourself into. Maybe we should go to Portofino?? A day spent having a lovely dinner. Clip On. So Bright and Fesh Looking. Guy de Maupassant wrote a famous story about a necklace. The story is about a young, pretty, intelligent, well educated but poorly endowed bride who has to marry a petty official; and thus suffering from the limitations of living a life with a husband that lacked any exquisite qualities. In order to entertain his dejected spouse, one day her husband gets an invitation to a ball and gives his wife 400 francs he had saved for a hunting rifle so that she would be able to order an appropriate dress. However, when the dress is ready it becomes clear that it is lacking jewelry; and it would be impossible to attend the ball while looking so poor. The protagonist approaches her rich childhood friend with whom she was raised together at the monastery and borrows a diamond necklace from her. The ball is a great success and she is the centre of attention. However when the woman returns home, she discovers that she has lost the necklace. In order to conceal her faux pas from her friend, she buys a new necklace identical to the one she lost, and to pay it off the woman gets into a huge debt which over the years gradually drags her down the social ladder from bourgeoisie to poverty. Ten years later, having lost her good looks, the woman encounters her friend on the Champs Elysees, who still looks young, beautiful and rich. The protagonist reveals to her friend the whole story about the necklace, but her friend replies in amazement that the diamonds were fake and would “cost 500 francs at most”. Maison Gripoix starts out with a dramatic story. In 1869 (or a year earlier, according to other sources), Paris master glass-maker Augustina Gripoix began making replicas of pearls and crystals; casting glass into different shapes and colours and inserting them into most sophisticated settings. She used the pâte de verre (glass paste) technique, whereby a traditional ceramic or qypsum form was filled with a multi-colour pieces of glass and special gluing substances and then baked in a furnace, resulting in objects featuring fantastical hues. Only Augustina made her crystals by pouring the melted glass paste into the press moulds skipping the furnace step, allowing her to achieve the purity of colour, transparency and shine. She found a simple method to make beautiful jewelry and thus Marquises, Duchesses and Princesses qued up ... so Madame Gripoix would make them replicas of their own jewelry in case of robbery or loss, or some unusual jewelry pieces for their new wraps, neckpieces, or boas. The so-called ‘costume jewelry’ emerged to a large extent thanks to the work of Maison Gripoix. Augustina Gripoix earned her fame in the 1890’s when she started making necklaces for Sarah Bernhardt to wear on stage; and later the costume jewelry for the first high fashion house of Charles Frederick Worth. Later on, Paul Poiret, the leading couturier of the 1910’s contacted her and she created sophisticated oriental style jewelry for him to match his famous oriental costumes based on the aesthetic of Diaghilev’s initial Russian seasons. The value of costume jewelry was now being recognized in its own right; and not just for imitation purposes. The taste of emancipated young girls, who were gaining more and more freedom and opportunities, was best met with bijouterie. So in the 1920, when Augustina’s daughter Susan became the head of the House; Gripoix prospects became even more exciting. Girls with short-cropped hair in short dresses zoomed by in open-top cars wearing bijou rather than diamonds. Everyone ordered bijouterie from Madam Gripoix during this period, from Jeanne Lanvin to Jean Piguet, but certainly the best relationship Gripoix had was with Gabriel Chanel. It is well-known that Chanel, a fan of large jewelry with large stones...
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1980s French Artist Vintage Maison Gripoix Jewelry & Watches

Materials

Mixed Metal

Maison Gripoix jewelry & watches for sale on 1stDibs.

Find a range of Maison Gripoix jewelry & watches available on 1stDibs. Each of these unique items was designed with extraordinary care, often using gilt metal. While looking for the most stylish antique or vintage Maison Gripoix jewelry to pair with your ensemble, you’ll find that Maison Gripoix crystal jewelry & watches, from our inventory of 3, can add a particularly distinctive touch to your look. We have 61 pieces in this collection as well as a number of other designs by this jeweler. While this collection reflects work that originated over various time periods, most of these items were designed during the 20th century. If you’re looking for additional options, many customers also consider jewelry & watches by Christian Lacroix Paris, Philippe Ferrandis, and Maison Goossens for Yves Saint Laurent. Prices for Maison Gripoix jewelry & watches can differ depending upon gemstone, time period and other attributes. On 1stDibs, the price for these items starts at $360 and tops out at $17,500, while pieces like these, on average, can sell for $1,650.

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