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Carlo Scarpa & Hiroyuki Toyoda Table with René Herbst Sandows Dining Chairs

About the Item

Dining room set consisting of Carlo Scarpa and Hiroyuki Toyoda for Simon Gavina large table with René Herbst 'Sandows' chairs Carlo Scarpa and Hiroyuki Toyoda for Simon Gavina, conference or dining table, fabric top, chromed steel, Italy, design 1973 Elegant conference table initially designed by Carlo Scarpa in 1973. However, it never went into production. After Scarpa’s death, the design was refined and finished by Hiroyki Toyoda in the early 1980s. The tabletop is made out of blue fabric which gives it an overall sleek look. This smooth feel is enhanced by the stunning frame which is formed by tubular chromed steel legs, finished with brass ends. Moreover, this streamlined concept is even more emphasized by the length of the table which is 4 meters long. In general, this graceful table has a very modern yet sophisticated look. Please note that we advise reupholstery before use. This item contains some threadbare upholstery with wear and stains. Reupholstery can be done before shipping by our experienced craftsmen and -women in our own in-house restoration atelier. With high attention for the original, they make sure every piece retains its value and is ready for the many years to come. We kindly ask you to contact our design experts for further information about the endless possibilities our restoration and upholstery atelier has to offer. Of course, a locally organized reupholstery is possible as well. Dimensions of the table: H 74 W 410 D 110 cm / H 29.13 W 161.42 D 43.31 inches René Herbst, set of fourteen 'Sandows' chairs, model '101', chrome-plated steel, elastic rope, France, design 1928, produced 1970s The 'Sandows' chair epitomizes the industrial advancements of the twenties, featuring a tubular steel construction integrated with elastic components. This chair remains the most renowned design of the esteemed French designer and architect René Herbst (1891-1982). Originating in 1928, this iconic work has earned a place of honor within the collection of the Museum of Modern Art in New York, a testament to its enduring significance within the history of art and design. The material used in constructing the chair's seat and backrest is known as 'Sandows', which is the French term for rubber bands. Given the significant number of these chairs in our collection, they present an excellent option for furnishing a spacious area, such as a dining hall, bistro, or café. Please note that the chairs might contain some rust and wear. For further details, we encourage you to reach out to our team of design specialists. Dimensions of the chairs: listed on the page
  • Creator:
    Simon Gavina Editions (Manufacturer),René Herbst (Designer),Hiroyuki Toyoda (Designer),Carlo Scarpa (Designer)
  • Dimensions:
    Height: 31.5 in (80 cm)Width: 16.54 in (42 cm)Depth: 20.08 in (51 cm)Seat Height: 18.51 in (47 cm)
  • Sold As:
    Set of 15
  • Materials and Techniques:
  • Place of Origin:
  • Period:
  • Date of Manufacture:
    1970s
  • Condition:
    Wear consistent with age and use. Every item Morentz offers is checked by our team of 30 craftsmen in our in-house workshop. Special restoration or reupholstery requests can be done. Check ‘About the item’ or ask our design specialists for detailed information on the condition.
  • Seller Location:
    Waalwijk, NL
  • Reference Number:
    Seller: 50113142 + 501138251stDibs: LU933137770202

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