Skip to main content
Want more images or videos?
Request additional images or videos from the seller

Circa 1900 Japanese Screen. Cherry Blossoms in Moonlight. Meiji period.

About the Item

Kobayashi Shosen (1877-1946) Cherry Blossoms in Moonlight Six-panel Japanese Screen. Ink, color and gofun on paper. The image depicts a stunning scene captured on a six-panel Japanese folding screen from the Meiji period. Commanding the center is a massive tree trunk belonging to a blooming cherry blossom tree, its horizontal span emphasizing its grandeur. The tree’s delicate blossoms are illuminated by the soft light of a rising full moon peeking from behind the trunk. The entire scene is bathed in the ethereal glow of the moonlight, casting a serene atmosphere. Blustery winds swirl through the air, causing cherry blossom petals to dance and drift gently across the scene. The artwork, rendered in the Japanese nihon-ga style of the turn of the century, features soft colors and subtle ink wash techniques, with light hues accentuating the delicate beauty of the flower petals. The trunk serves as a natural divider between the foreground and background, creating a sense of depth and perspective within the painting. The image captures the tranquility and ephemeral beauty of a moonlit cherry blossom night in Japan. Cherry blossoms or sakura hold profound significance in Japanese culture, weaving intricate layers of meaning in literature, poetry, and art. Their brief blossoming period often parallels the transient beauty of existence. ‘Mono no aware’ is a Japanese phrase that encapsulates the delicate emotions evoked by the subtle nuances of life and the changing seasons. In this scene the moon's luminous presence and the gentle fall of cherry blossoms evoke a profound sense of mono no aware, inviting contemplation of life's fleeting moments. Kobayashi Shosen, born in Atsuta, Aichi Prefecture in 1877, embarked on his artistic journey under the tutelage of Hattori Sekisen from the Shijo school. Upon relocating to Tokyo, he honed his craft under the guidance of Kawai Gyokudo. Seeking to further refine his skills, he pursued studies with Takeuchi Seiho in Kyoto. Throughout his career, Shosen showcased his talent through depictions of shrines, temples, flowers, and birds. Renowned for his mastery in painting sparrows, he earned a reputation as a foremost artist in this genre. In his later years, he transitioned to a lighter and more stylish painting style characterized by reduced brushstrokes, earning widespread acclaim for his skillful use of negative spaces. Amidst the turmoil of war, he found refuge in Gifu prefecture and passed away in Nakatsugawa city in 1946.
  • Dimensions:
    Height: 68.5 in (173.99 cm)Width: 145 in (368.3 cm)Depth: 0.75 in (1.91 cm)
  • Style:
    Meiji (Of the Period)
  • Materials and Techniques:
  • Place of Origin:
  • Period:
  • Date of Manufacture:
    Circa 1900
  • Condition:
    Refinished. Wear consistent with age and use. The screen has been furnished with a new black lacquered frame and new backing paper.
  • Seller Location:
    Kyoto, JP
  • Reference Number:
    1stDibs: LU2472338838512
More From This SellerView All
  • Meiji Era, Circa 1900 Japanese Screen Pair, Flowers & Birds of Spring & Autumn
    Located in Kyoto, JP
    Flowers & Birds of Spring and Autumn Unknown artist. Japan. Meiji period, circa 1900. A pair of six-fold screens. Ink, color, gofun and gold leaf on paper. Signed: Gaga S...
    Category

    Antique 1890s Japanese Meiji Paintings and Screens

    Materials

    Gold Leaf

  • Japanese Silver Screen Pair, Meiji Period, Herons & Plovers, Shijo School
    Located in Kyoto, JP
    Heron & Plovers Ink and silver leaf on paper Maekawa Bunrei (1837-1917) A pair of low six-panel Japanese screens by Maekawa Bunrei, a later master of the Kyoto based Shijo school of painting. On the right screen a solitary white heron stands motionless in a stream. On the left screen plovers play along a shoreline. The elegant forms are executed employing fluid, minimalistic ink brushstrokes. The soft brushstrokes and the sharp light of the silver leaf lend the scenes a sense of translucence. The sophisticated composition superbly exploits the long, horizontal pictorial surface of the pair of folding screens...
    Category

    Antique Early 1900s Japanese Meiji Paintings and Screens

    Materials

    Silver Leaf

  • Meiji Period Japanese Screen Pair, One Hundred Birds by Hasegawa Gyokujun
    Located in Kyoto, JP
    One hundred birds Hasegawa Gyokujun (1863-1921) Meiji period, circa 1900. Ink, color and gofun on silk. Dimensions of each screen: H. 170 cm x W. 190 cm (67’’ x 75”) Despite the title, well over 100 birds are represented in this pair of two-fold Japanese screens (the title functions figuratively to convey the idea of a large number). The monumental work is rendered with a comprehensive and highly complex composition which is exquisitely executed and meticulously colored. More a celebration of naturalism than the traditional “One Hundred Birds” paintings which originated in China. This was a subject matter known for its auspicious meaning as much as its actual depiction of nature. These paintings generally had a phoenix (occasionally peacocks) placed in the center, and the other birds paying homage to it. In this quintessentially Japanese scene painted by Gyokujun, a couple of long-tailed birds modeled after paradise flycatchers are included; these are traditional auspicious motifs in Oriental bird and flower painting and denote themes such as celebration and enduring generations. In addition there is the playful inclusion of single exotic parrot. Even so, the vast majority of the birds and flowers are native to Japan. Reading the scene from right to left, from spring through to autumn, the overwhelming sense is one of movement and haste. It is almost as if the birds are in a race, with the fleetest leading the way forward. Although these native birds were commonly drawn amongst artists of the Shijo school, rarely were they painted with such drama and dynamism. It is not strictly a depiction of sketched birds whose manner was faithfully handed down through the traditions of the Shijo school. Rather we see Gyokujun seeking and achieving new expressions in the heart of the turbulent Meiji period. Hasegawa Gyokujun (1863-1921) was born in Kyoto. He was the eldest son of Hasegawa Gyokuho, a Shijo school painter who studied under Matsumura Keibun. Gyokujun studied painting under his father and became a prominent member of the Kyoto painti ng world from a young age. In 1891 he established the ‘Young Painters Social Club’ along with Takeuchi Seiho, Miyake Gogyo and Taniguchi Kokyo. Also in 1891 he was selected as a judge of the Great Private Paintings Exhibition along with Takeuchi Seiho, Yamamoto Shunkyo...
    Category

    Antique Early 1900s Japanese Meiji Paintings and Screens

    Materials

    Silk, Wood

  • Early 20th Century Japanese Cherry Blossom Screen by Kano Sanrakuki
    Located in Kyoto, JP
    Cherry Blossoms Kano Sanrakuki (1898-1981) Showa period, circa 1930 2-panel Japanese Screen Color, gofun and gold leaf on paper Against a backdrop of gold-leafed ground, the lichen covered trunk and branches of the life-sized cherry blossom tree reach out and beyond the confines of the pictorial surface. The overall composition has a feeling of flatness which draws emphasis to the surface and the three-dimensionality of the cherry blossoms. Painstakingly built-up layers of thickly applied shell-white gofun detail the voluminous blossoms and cover large areas of this tour-de-force of Japanese Nihonga painting. By simplifying the background, minimizing the number of colors and depicting the blossoms with such heavy relief, the artist has emphasized the stunning presence of the cherry tree. The type of tree depicted is the Yae-Zakura; a double-layered type of cherry blossom famed for its beauty and strength. When we think of Japanese cherry blossoms, the first thing that comes to mind is Somei Yoshino variety, which has a single flower with five almost white petals. This type is fragile and easily blown away by strong wind or rain. Most of the double-flowered cherry blossoms begin to bloom when the Somei-Yoshino falls, and the flowering period lasts longer than that of the Somei-Yoshino. Kano Sanrakuki originally studied painting at the Kyoto City Arts and Crafts School under the tutelage of Yamamoto Shunkyo...
    Category

    Early 20th Century Japanese Showa Paintings and Screens

    Materials

    Gold Leaf

  • Early 19th Century Japanese Screen. Cherry Blossom & Pheasants by Mori Tetsuzan
    Located in Kyoto, JP
    Mori Tetsuzan (1775-1841) Pheasants and Cherry Blossoms Two-fold Japanese screen. Ink, color, gofun, gold and silver on paper. A two-fold Japanese bir...
    Category

    Antique Early 19th Century Japanese Edo Paintings and Screens

    Materials

    Gold Leaf

  • 19th Century Japanese Silk Painting by Kano Chikanobu, Cherry Blossom & Birds
    Located in Kyoto, JP
    Birds & flowers of the seasons Pheasants & plum in snow Unframed painting. Ink, pigment and gofun on silk Kano Chikanobu 1819-1888 Signature...
    Category

    Antique Mid-19th Century Asian Edo Paintings and Screens

    Materials

    Silk

You May Also Like
  • Antique Japanese Meiji Period Silk Embroidered Screen Room Divider Byobu C.1900
    Located in London, GB
    Antique Japanese Meiji period silk embroidered screen /room divider Byobu C.1900 Kyoto, Japan. Silk embroidered satin lacquer framed panels....
    Category

    Antique Early 1900s Japanese Meiji Paintings and Screens

    Materials

    Silk, Lacquer

  • Japanese Meiji Period Painting by Shôjin Nishimura , Plum tree in Moonlight
    Located in Amsterdam, Noord Holland
    Category

    Antique Mid-19th Century Japanese Meiji Paintings and Screens

    Materials

    Silk

  • Japanese Meiji Period Six Panel Screen Ducks in Water Landscape
    Located in Rio Vista, CA
    19th century Japanese Meiji period six-panel screen depicting a serene water landscape with ducks and songbirds amid Momiji (red maple) hibiscus, and morning glory. Made in the Nihon...
    Category

    Antique 19th Century Japanese Meiji Paintings and Screens

    Materials

    Silk, Wood, Paper

  • Japanese Meiji Period Two Panel Screen
    Located in Stamford, CT
    Japanese Meiji Period (1868-1912) two-panel painted screen with various Tale of Genji scenes - ink, colors and gold leaf on paper.
    Category

    Antique 1870s Japanese Paintings and Screens

    Materials

    Paper

  • Meiji Period Japanese Four Panel Screen Bijin At Leisure
    Located in Hudson, NY
    Japanese four panel screen: Bijin At Leisure. Ladies in a tea house with a small dog. Seal reads "Ensan dai" (drawn by Ensan). Meiji Period (1868 - 1912) pa...
    Category

    Antique Late 19th Century Japanese Meiji Paintings and Screens

    Materials

    Silk, Wood

  • Japanese Two Panel Screen, Cherry Blossoms in Willow Landscape
    Located in Hudson, NY
    Dramatic and beautifully executed cherry blossoms trickle down the two panels with natural willows calmly coexisting with luminous gold dust fading to the ground. Mineral pigments an...
    Category

    Antique Mid-19th Century Japanese Paintings and Screens

    Materials

    Gold

Recently Viewed

View All