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Jan Frans van Bloemen (Orizzonte)
Wooden Landscape with Shepherds, Fountain and Flock - by Jan Frans van Bloemen

18th century

About the Item

Bibliography: A.Busiri Vici, Jan Frans Van Bloemen Orizzonte e l’origine del paesaggio romano settecentesco, Ugo Bozzi Editore, Roma 1974, n.41 This artwork is shipped from Italy. Under existing legislation, any artwork in Italy created over 50 years ago by an artist who has died requires a licence for export regardless of the work’s market price. The shipping may require additional handling days to require the licence according to the final destination of the artwork.
  • Creator:
  • Creation Year:
    18th century
  • Dimensions:
    Height: 18.9 in (48 cm)Width: 28.35 in (72 cm)Depth: 0.95 in (2.4 cm)
  • Medium:
  • Movement & Style:
  • Period:
  • Condition:
    Insurance may be requested by customers as additional service, contact us for more information.
  • Gallery Location:
    Roma, IT
  • Reference Number:
    Seller: J-782891stDibs: LU65035777731
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