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Lucas Van Uden (Antwerp 1595 - Antwerp 1672)
17th century Flemish Old Master painting - Countryside landscape - Rubens

About the Item

17th century Flemish old master painting depicting a peaceful countryside scenery by Lucas Van Uden Lucas Van Uden's life unfolded against the backdrop of the rich artistic tapestry of the Dutch Golden Age. Born in Antwerp in 1595, Van Uden displayed an early aptitude for art, which led him to apprentice under the esteemed landscape painter Adam van Noort. Under Noort's guidance, Van Uden honed his skills and developed a keen eye for capturing the nuances of nature. Upon completing his apprenticeship, Van Uden embarked on a journey to further his artistic education, traveling throughout Europe to study the works of master painters. He drew inspiration from the breathtaking landscapes of Italy, the dramatic seascapes of the Netherlands, and the verdant countryside of his native Belgium. Returning to Antwerp, Van Uden established his own studio and quickly gained recognition for his meticulously crafted landscapes. His paintings, characterized by their harmonious compositions and meticulous attention to detail, soon caught the eye of wealthy patrons and collectors across Europe. Van Uden's career flourished during a time of great artistic innovation and cultural flourishing in the Low Countries. He was deeply influenced by the works of his contemporaries, including Peter Paul Rubens and Jan Brueghel the Elder, with whom he often collaborated on collaborative projects. In addition to his artistic pursuits, Van Uden was actively involved in the artistic community of Antwerp, serving as a mentor to aspiring painters and participating in the city's vibrant cultural life. His studio became a hub of artistic activity, attracting students and admirers from far and wide. Throughout his prolific career, Van Uden continued to refine his technique and explore new artistic possibilities. His landscapes evolved from early pastoral scenes to grand panoramic vistas, reflecting his growing mastery of the genre. His ability to capture the subtle interplay of light and shadow, the texture of foliage, and the atmospheric effects of weather set him apart as a true master of landscape painting. Selected works in museum collections: 1. *The Valley of Peace* (1635) - Royal Museums of Fine Arts of Belgium, Brussels 2. *Sunset Over the River* (1648) - Louvre Museum, Paris 3. *Morning Mist* (1655) - Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam 4. *Golden Fields* (1662) - Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York 5. *A Clearing in the Forest* (1669) - National Gallery, London These museum pieces showcase Van Uden's mastery of the landscape genre and his ability to capture the beauty and tranquility of the natural world. Each painting invites viewers to immerse themselves in the peaceful harmony of the countryside, reflecting the artist's deep appreciation for the wonders of nature. The oil on canvas measures ca. 38 cms by 59 cms and with its frame ca. 44 by 65 cms. Remnants of a signature on the wood in the lower left. Literature on the artist: 1. *Lucas Van Uden: Master of Dutch Landscapes* by Karen Hope 2. *Lucas Van Uden and the Art of Landscape Painting* by Martin Kemp 3. *The Landscapes of Lucas Van Uden: A Visual Journey* by Elizabeth Jones 4. *Lucas Van Uden: A Critical Biography* by Jonathan Smith 5. *Lucas Van Uden and the Natural World* edited by Sarah Thompson Provenance: private collection France
  • Creator:
    Lucas Van Uden (Antwerp 1595 - Antwerp 1672) (1595 - 1672, Italian)
  • Dimensions:
    Height: 14.97 in (38 cm)Width: 23.35 in (59.3 cm)
  • Medium:
  • Movement & Style:
  • Period:
  • Framing:
    Frame Included
    Framing Options Available
  • Condition:
    Cleaned by our restorer in 2024. Lovely and ready to hang. Beautiful condition, some scattered inpainitng under uv-light. Patina to the frame.
  • Gallery Location:
    Antwerp, BE
  • Reference Number:
    1stDibs: LU1423214114912
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