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(after) Henri Matisse Prints and Multiples

French
Henri Matisse was born on December 31, 1869, in Le Cateau-Cambrésis, France. At 22, he had given up studying law in Paris to pursue painting. He had briefly studied art at the Académie Julian and Ecole des Beaux-Arts with Gustave Moreau. At 32, Matisse exhibited at the Salon des Indépendants in Paris, where he met Maurice de Vlaminck, who with Matisse would eventually lead the Fauve art movement. Matisse's work was included in the 1913 Armory Show in New York, and throughout the 1910s and into the 1920s, his work began to find collectors around the world. Throughout the 1920s and 1930s, he divided his time between Paris and southern France, producing paintings, sculpture, lithographs, and etchings. Like many avant-garde artists in Paris, Matisse was receptive to a broad range of influences, particularly 'primitive' art, Near Eastern decorative art, African masks and sculpture, impressionist color, cubism, and the paintings of Paul Cezanne. The artist's images of the human face and figure -rendered in fluid lines and flat fields of color- typify these influences. Matisse argued for the prominence of instinct in art production, believing that an artist should not have complete control over color and form. He died on November 3, 1954, in Nice.
(Biography provided by Georgetown Frame Shoppe)
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Artist: (after) Henri Matisse
Creole Dancer
By (after) Henri Matisse
Located in Collonge Bellerive, Geneve, CH
after Henri Matisse - Acrobat Edition of 200 with the printed signature, as issued 80 x 60 cm Posthumous edition after the original paper cut-out with stamp of the Succession Matisse References : Artvalue - Succession Matisse MATISSE'S BIOGRAPHY YOUTH AND EARLY EDUCATION Henri Emile Benoît Matisse was born in a tiny, tumbledown weaver's cottage on the rue du Chêne Arnaud in the textile town of Le Cateau-Cambrésis at eight o'clock in the evening on the last night of the year, 31 December 1869 (Le Cateau-Cambrésis is in the extreme north of France near the Belgian border). The house had two rooms, a beaten earth floor and a leaky roof. Matisse said long afterwards that rain fell through a hole above the bed in which he was born. Matisse’s ancestors had lived in the area for centuries before the convulsive social and industrial upheavals of the nineteenth century. Matisse grew up in a world that was still detaching itself from a way of life in some ways unchanged since Roman times. The coming of the railway had put Bohain on the industrial map, but people still traveled everywhere on foot or horseback. Matisse’s father, Émile Hippolyte Matisse, was a grain merchant whose family were weavers. His mother, Anna Heloise Gerard, was a daughter of a long line of well-to-do tanners. Warmhearted, outgoing, capable and energetic, she was small and sturdily built with the fashionable figure of the period: full breasts and hips, narrow waist, neat ankles and elegant small feet. She had fair skin, broad cheekbones and a wide smile. "My mother had a face with generous features," said her son Henri, who always spoke of her with particular tenderness of the sensitivity. Throughout the forty years of her marriage, she provided unwavering, rocklike support to her husband and her sons. Matisse later said: "My mother loved everything I did." He grew up in nearby Bohain-en-Vermandois, an industrial textile center, until the age of ten, when his father sent him to St. Quentin for lycée. Anna Heloise worked hard. She ran the section of her husband's shop that sold housepaints, making up the customers' orders and advising on color schemes. The colors evidently left a lasting impression on Henri. The artist himself later said he got his color sense from his mother, who was herself an accomplished painter on porcelain, a fashionable art form at the time. Henri was the couple’s first son. The young Matisse was an awkward youth who seemed ill-adapted to the rigors of the North; in particular, he hated the gelid winters. He was a pensive child and by his own account he was a dreamy, frail and not outstandingly bright. In later life he never lost his feeling for his native soil, for seeds and growing things he had encountered in his youth. The fancy pigeons he kept in Nice more than half a century after he left home recalled the weavers' pigeon-lofts tucked away behind even the humblest house in Bohain. Matisse's childhood memories were of a stern upbringing. "Be quick!" "Look out!" "Run along!" "Get cracking!" were the refrains that rang in his ears as a boy. In later years when survival itself depended on habits of thrift and self-denial, the artist prided himself on being a man of the North. When Matisse in turn had children of his own to bring up, he chided himself for any lapse in discipline or open display of tenderness as weakness on his part. In 1887 he went to Paris to study law, working as a court administrator in Le Cateau-Cambrésis after gaining his qualification. Although he considered law as tedious, he nonetheless passed the bar in 1888 with distinction and began his practice begrudgingly. Once Matisse finished school, his father, a much more practical man, arranged for his son to obtain a clerking position at a law office. PAINTING: BEGINNINGS Matisse’s discovery of his true profession came about in an unusual manner. Following an attack of appendicitis, he began to paint in 1889, when his mother had brought him art supplies during the period of convalescence. He said later, “From the moment I held the box of colors in my hands, I knew this was my life. I threw myself into it like a beast that plunges towards the thing it loves.” Matisse’s mother was the first to advise her son not to adhere to the “rules” of art, but rather listen to his own emotions. Matisse was so committed to his art that he later extended a warning to his fiancée, Amélie Parayre, whom he later married: “I love you dearly, mademoiselle; but I shall always love painting more.” Matisse had discovered "a kind of paradise" as he later described it. His drastic change of profession deeply disappointed his father. Two years later in 1891 Matisse returned to Paris to study art at the Académie Julian and became a student of William-Adolphe Bouguereau. After a discouraging year at the Académie Julian, he left in disgust at the overly perfectionist style of teaching there. Afterwards he trained with Gustave Moreau, an artist who nurtured more progressive leanings. In both studios, as was usual, students drew endless figure studies from life. From Bouguereau, he learned the fundamental lessons of classical painting. His one art-schooled technical standby, almost a fetish, was the plumb line. No matter how odd the angles in any Matisse, the verticals are usually dead true. Moreau was a painter who despised the "art du salon", so Matisse was destined, in a certain sense, to remain an "outcast" of the art world. He initially failed his drawing exam for admission to the École des Beaux-Arts, but persisted and was finally accepted. Matisse began painting still-lives and landscapes in the traditional Flemish style, at which he achieved reasonable proficiency. Most of his early works employ a dark palette and tend to be gloomy. Chardin was one of Matisse's most admired painters having made four the French still-life master paintings in the Louvre. Although he executed numerous copies after the old masters he also studied contemporary art. His first experimentations earned him a reputation as the rebellious member of his studio classes. In 1896, Matisse was elected as an associate member of the Société Nationale, which meant that each year he could show paintings at the Salon de la Société without having to submit them for review. In the same year he exhibited 5 paintings in the salon of the Société Nationale des Beaux-Arts, and the state bought two of his paintings. This was the first and almost only recognition he received in his native country during his lifetime. In 1897 and 1898, he visited the painter John Peter Russell on the island Belle Île off the coast of Brittany. Russell introduced him to Impressionism and to the work of Van Gogh who had been a good friend of Russell but was completely unknown at the time. Matisse's style changed completely, and he would later say "Russell was my teacher, and Russell explained color theory to me." Matisse also observed Russell's and other artists' stable marriages. This probably influenced him to find in Amélie Noellie Parayre, his future wife, his anchor. The Dinner Table (1897) was Matisse’s first masterpiece, and he had spent the entire winter working on the oeuvre. Though the Salon displayed the piece, they hung the work in a poor location, disgusted by what they considered its radical, Impressionist aspects. Caroline Joblaud was Matisse's early lover for four years during his initial struggles to affirm his artistic direction and professional career. Caroline (also called Camille) gave Matisse his first daughter Marguerite in 1894, who after Matisse's marriage to Amélie Noellie Parayre was warmly accepted contrary to conventional hostility such arrangements provoked. Caroline posed various times for the artist’s compositions while Marguerite served many times as a model for Matisse throughout his life. MARRIAGE WITH AMÉLIE NOELLIE PARAYRE The Matisses of Bohain and the Parayres of Beauzelle had outwardly nothing in common, and there was no reason why Matisse and Amélie should ever have met. But in October 1897 Matisse went to a wedding in Paris and happened to sit next to her at the uproarious banquet that followed. There had been no banal flirtation between them, even when the wine flowed, each recognized the other as true metal, and when they got up from the table she held out her hand to Henri Matisse in a way that he never forgot. Matisse at that time was not yet the professorial figure of legend. He was known as a prankster, as a ribald and anti-clerical songster, and as someone who had once broken up a café concert performance just for the hell of it. Amélie's relatives operated at that time within a social, intellectual, and political context of which Matisse had had no previous experience. They stood for free thinking, for the separation of church and state, and for the secularization of the French educational system. Her family, better off that that of Matisse, provided the support he needed for the budding artist. When Matisse married Amélie in January 1898, they had been introduced only three months after. Amélie's Aunt Noélie and two of her brothers ran a successful women's shop called the Grande Maison des Modes. Before her marriage, Amélie had shown a gift for designing, making, and modeling hats for a fashionable clientele. In June 1899, she found a partner and opened a shop of her own on the rue de Châteaudun. This allowed Henri and herself to live, with Marguerite, in a tiny two-room apartment on the same street. Madame Matisse, fervently loyal, would play a fundamental role in the life and career of the artist for more than 40 years. Marguerite was to become her father's lifetime mainstay In 1902 disaster struck. Amélie’s parents were disgraced and financially ruined in a spectacular scandal of national scope, as the unsuspecting employees of a woman whose financial empire was based on fraud. Thanks to his early years in a lawyer's office, Matisse was able to busy himself to great effect in the organization of his father-in-law's defense. When all about him lost their heads, burst into tears, and felt more than sorry for themselves, Henri Matisse dealt with their problems one by one. The ordeal had taken its toll, in more than one way. His doctors ordered Matisse to go to Bohain and take two months' complete rest. Amélie had lost both her hat shop and the apartment on the rue de Châteaudun. For the first time, Henri, Amélie and the three children were united in Bohain, having nowhere else to go. Hillary Spurling, one of Matisse’s biographers, asserts that Amélie’s memories of that public disgrace nurtured a “suspicion of the outside world” that would always mark the Matisse family. The Matisse family formed a kind of hermetic unit which revolved around the artist’s work and profession. They fitted their activities according his breaks and work sessions. Silence was essential. Even during the years when Matisse lived mostly alone in Nice, an annual ritual of unpacking, stretching, framing and hanging ended with the whole family settling down to respond to the paintings. The conference might last several days. Then the dealers were admitted. Matisse and his wife had had two sons, Jean (born 1899) and Pierre (born 1900). He was not always in peace with his family. He wrote that their views were not always in accord “which disturbs me considerably in my work, for which I require the most complete calm and from those how surround me, a serenity that I cannot find here. I intend to move to a village a few league away.” Pierre, his brother, Jean, and Marguerite remained close to their father through every vicissitude, and Matisse, in his last invalid years, was devoted to his several grandchildren. In 1899, at a time when his paintings displayed rebellious talent but not much clear direction, Matisse began attending classes in clay modeling and sculpture. Assigned to copy one of the sculptural masterpieces in the Louvre, he selected Jaguar Devouring a Hare a violently precise work by Antoine-Louis Barye. Later, whenever his paintings seemed stuck, he turned to sculpture to organize his thoughts and sensations. Influenced by the works of the post-Impressionists Paul Cézanne, Gauguin, Van Gogh and Paul Signac, and also by Japanese art, Matisse made color a crucial element of his paintings. Matisse said, "In modern art, it is indubitably to Cézanne that I owe the most." By studying Cézanne’s fragmented planes -- which stretched the idea of the still life to a forced contemplation of color surfaces themselves -- Matisse was able to reconstruct his own philosophy of the still life. Many of his paintings from 1899 to 1905 make use of a pointillist technique adopted from Signac. In 1898, he went to London to study the paintings of J. M. W. Turner and then went on a trip to Corsica. After years in poverty, Matisse went through his "dark period" (1902-03), moved briefly to naturalism, went back to a dark palette and told friends in 1903 that he had lost all desire to paint and had almost decided to give up. Fortunately, Matisse was able to earn some money painting a frieze for the World Fair at the Grand Palais in Paris. He also traveled extensively in the early 1900s when tourism was still a new idea. Brought on by railroad, steamships, and other forms of transportation that appeared during the industrial revolution, travel became a popular pursuit. As a cultured tourist, he developed his art with regular doses of travel. FAUVISM Matisse's career can be divided into several periods that changed stylistically, but his underlying aim always remained the same: to discover "the essential character of things" and to produce an art "of balance, purity, and serenity," as he himself put it. The changing studio environments seemed always to have had a significant effect on the style of his work. In these first years of struggle Matisse set his revolutionary artistic agenda. He disregarded perspective, abolished shadows, repudiating the academic distinction between line and color. He was attempting to overturn a way of seeing evolved and accepted by the Western world for centuries by substituting a conscious subjectivity in the place of the traditional illusion of objectivity . Matisse hit his stride in the avant-garde art world in the first years of the new decade. He explored the modern art scene through frequent visits to galleries such as Durand-Ruel and Vollard, where he was exposed to work by Paul Cézanne, Paul Gauguin, and Vincent van Gogh. Matisse’s first solo exhibition took place in 1904, without much success. In 16 May 1905 he arrived in the charming Catalan port of Collioure, in the south of France. He soon invited the painter André Derain (1880-1954), 11 years his junior, to join him. By 1905, Matisse was considered spearhead the Fauve movement in France, characterized by its spontaneity and roughness of execution as well as use of raw color straight from the palette to the canvas. Matisse combined pointillist color and Cézanne’s way of structuring pictorial space stroke by stroke to develop Fauvism - a way less of seeing the world than of feeling it with one’s eyes. When the Fauve summer drew to an end, Derain left Collioure with 30 paintings, 20 drawings and some 50 sketches, never to return, while Matisse departed some days later bringing back to Paris 15 finished paintings, 40 aquarelles, over 100 drawings. He returned Collioure in the summers of 1906, 1907, 1911 and 1914. The lure of the sun would prove always to have powers of restoration to the artist throughout his life particularly after periods of great emotional exertion. When Fauvist works were first exhibited Salon d'Automne in Paris they created a scandal. Eyewitness accounts tell of laughter emanating from room VII where they were displayed. Gertrud Stein, one of Matisse's most important future supporters, reported that people scratched at the canvases in derision. "A pot of paint has been flung in the face of the public" was the reaction by the critic Camille Mauclair. Louis Vauxcelles described the work with the historic phrase "Donatello au milieu des fauves!" (Donatello among the wild beasts), referring to a Renaissance-type sculpture that shared the room with them. His comment was printed on 17 October 1905 in Gil Blas, a daily newspaper, and passed into popular usage. Derain himself later called the Fauves' color "sticks of dynamite." The painting that was singled out for attacks was Matisse's Woman with a Hat, a portrait of Madame Matisse. This picture was bought be was bought by Gertrude and Leo Stein, a fact which had a very positive effect on Matisse who was suffering demoralization from the bad reception of his work. Matisse continued his experiments in Collioure, visible in the painting The Open Window and the View of Collioure , also a characteristic work of Fauvism in its raw color and disregard for details. Both of these works of the landscape in the French Mediterranean present a distinct development towards the spontaneous and uninhibited style. Other than André Derain, Georges Braque, Raoul Dufy and Maurice Vlaminck were also members of the Fauve movement. However, Matisse’s intimate friends among artists were mostly easygoing minor painters, such as Albert Marquet. Matisse’s temperamental aloneness made him prey to vertiginous depressions. He later recalled a breakdown that he underwent in Spain, in 1910: “My bed shook, and from my throat came a little high-pitched cry that I could not stop.” From the onset of is career women were from one of the cardinal motifs of the artist's production. His Joy of Life (1906) draws us into the world of hallucinatory vividness composed of nymphs set in an idyllic open fields dressed in pure color and sensual outline. Two women lounge in the sunlight while two more chat on the edge of the forest. One crouches to pick some flowers while her companion weaves a chain of them into her hair. A couple embraces each other while another group engages in a lively round-dance in the distance. In this way, Joy of Life depicts woodland nymphs engaging in a celebration of their life, their womanhood, and their sexuality. Due to the recurrent incidence of nude women and intensely sensual interpretation many observers have assumed that as a man Matisse must have been a hedonist. On the contrary, historic examination demonstrates that in reality, he was rather a self-abnegating Northerner who lived only to work, and did so in chronic anguish, recurrent panic, and amid periodic breakdowns. While Picasso recompensed himself, as he went along, with gratifications of intellectual and erotic play Matisse did not. In an age of ideologies, Matisse dodged all ideas except perhaps one: that art is life by other means. Matisse’s uninhibited celebration of women is often believed to have initiated from Cézanne’s painting Three Bathers (1882) (which he had acquired for himself along with a Van Gogh and a Gauguin). However, Matisse depicts women as nurturing, welcoming, and unlike the forbidding, massive clay-like presence of those of Paul Cézanne. FAME The decline of the Fauvist movement, after 1906, did nothing to deter the rise of Matisse. From 1906 -1917 he lived in Paris and established his home, studio, and school at Hôtel Biron. Among his neighbors is sculptor Auguste Rodin, writer Jean Cocteau, and dancer Isadora Duncan. Many of his finest works were created in this period, when he was an active part of the great gathering of artistic talent in Montparnasse, even though he did not quite fit in with his conservative appearance and strict bourgeois work habits. In fact, the aim of Matisse’s art was something less than revolutionary. In 1908, in a famous statement drawn from “Notes of a Painter,” Matisse declared as his ideal an art “for every mental worker, for the businessman as well as the man of letters, for example, a soothing, calming influence on the mind, something like a good armchair which provides relaxation from physical fatigue.” Matisse's personal habits were incredibly regular. On a typical day rose early and worked all morning with a second work session after lunch, followed by violin practice, a simple supper (vegetable soup, two hard-boiled eggs, salad and a glass of wine) and an early bedtime. In 1906, he created a series of 12 lithographs, all variations on the theme of a seated nude. He chose to share his graphic work with the public almost immediately. The lithographs were exhibited at the Druet Gallery in Paris the same year that they were produced, and the woodcuts were shown at the Salon des Independants in the spring of 1907. In 1907 Appolinaire, commenting about Matisse in an article published in La Falange, said, "We are not here in the presence of an extravagant or an extremist undertaking: Matisse's art is eminently reasonable." Notwithstanding newly-won fame, Matisse's work continued to encounter vehement criticism and it was difficult for him to provide for his family. His controversial 1907 painting Blue Nude was burned in effigy at the Armory Show in Chicago in 1913. Contrary to the fate of the Impressionists, Matisse and other Fauves were able to exhibit in art galleries. In 1908 Paul Cassirer, the German art dealer and editor who played a significant role in the promotion of the work the French Impressionists and Post-Impressionists, staged an exhibit of Matisse’s works in Berlin. In the same year the American photographer Alfred Stieglitz in New York organized him one-man show in his tiny Manhattan gallery called 291 which effectively introduced Matisse the powerful American art market. In the first decade of his notoriety as the leader of the Fauves, Matisse was more admired by foreigners than by the French. It was, after all, the Russians and the Americans who acquired significant collections of his early work almost as quickly as it was created. The great Matisses we see in the Paris museums today were mostly acquired after the artist's death in lieu of death duties. It took the French a good deal longer to understand Matisse's greatness-longer, certainly, than the international cadre of aspiring talents that flocked to his classes when he was still one of the most controversial figures in the Paris avant-garde. In the summer of 1907, Matisse and his wife went on a long trip to italy "for work and Pleasure," visiting Venice and Padua, where they admired Giotto's frescos. In Florence the were the guests of the Steins in their villa in Fiesole. From this base matisse visited Arezzo, to study Piero della Francesca, and Siena, attracted by the early Sienese painters, especially, Duccio. PICASSO, GERTRUDE STEIN AND THE CONE SISTERS During the first decade of the 20th century Americans in Paris Gertrude Stein, her brothers Leo Stein, Michael Stein and Michael's wife Sarah took keen interest in Matisse's art. In addition, Gertrude Stein's two friends from Baltimore. Clarabel and Etta Cone, became major patrons of Matisse and Picasso, collecting hundreds of their works.The Cone Sisters acquired their first Matisse in 1906 and, during the next four decades, went on to form one of the world's great collections of his art. The Cone Collection not only contains major works from every phase of Matisse's long career but reflects the sisters' special interest in his Nice period, when a new complexity of form and psychology entered the ever intense surface allure of his paintings. In April of 1906 during a gathering at the house of the legendary Gertrude Stein, Matisse was introduced to Pablo Picasso who was 11 years younger. Picasso and Matisse were poles apart aesthetically and their life styles were no less so. Matisse was markedly taller and more polished than the stocky, cocky Catalan, was then ruler of the turbulent Paris avant-garde art scene. The two were said to have always been looking over their shoulders at each other. It is well-known that after their rivalry grew, sides were taken. Picasso later said: "No one has ever looked at Matisse's paintings more carefully than I; and no one has looked at mine more carefully than he." One key difference between their pictorial concepts was that Matisse drew and painted from nature, while Picasso was much more inclined to work from imagination. The subjects painted most frequently by both artists were women and still lives, with Matisse more likely to place his figures in fully realized interiors. Gertrude Stein, who loved stirring things up, wrote, "the feeling between the Picassoites and the Matisse-ites became bitter." Although Matisse dryly noted that "our disputes were always friendly," it should be pointed out that Picasso and his friends threw suction-cupped darts at Matisse's 1906 Portrait of Marguerite (which Picasso had obtained in a trade for his own Pitcher, Bowl and Lemon, from 1907). While the rift between the two artists eventually healed, the one between their supporters remained. ACADEMIE MATISSE IN PARIS & SERGEI SHCHUKIN In 1909, with the Matisse family lived in a former convent on the Boulevard des Invalides, in Paris, where the artist conducted a painting school. His immense notoriety, which had been confirmed in 1905-06 by Joy of Life, a work which seemed to trash every possible norm of pictorial order and painterly finesse.His friends organized and financed the Académie Matisse in Paris, a private and non-commercial school in which Matisse instructed young artists. It operated from 1911 until 1917. Hans Purrmann and Sarah Stein were several of his most loyal students. Although it lasted for only three years (1908-11), and yet, during its brief existence the Académie Matisse became one of the principal crossroads of modern painting for a number of gifted European and American artists. Given the reputation Matisse had acquired as the"wild man" of modernist color, it must have come as a shock to some of his early students that the program of instruction he offered was remarkably conservative. As Jean Heiberg, the first Norwegian to enroll in the Académie, later wrote in a memoir: "The school had, at Matisse's suggestion, acquired a copy of two antique sculptures from the Louvre, Mars and an archaic sculpture, which he often used to demonstrate. Every now and then he got completely rid of the life model and we only drew from the plaster casts, and his critiques then were no less profitable." Among Matisse’s students was Olga Meerson, a Russian Jew who had studied with Wassily Kandinsky in Munich and, already possessed of an elegant style, sought to remake herself under Matisse’s tutelage. Amélie suspected the worst. Perhaps a combination of Amélie’s jealousy and Meerson’s neediness caused a Matisse to end the connection, with bad feeling all around. Meerson moved to Munich, where she married the musician Heinz Pringsheim, a brother-in-law of Thomas Mann. Never having fulfilled her promise as a painter, she committed suicide in Berlin, in 1929. One of Matisse's biographers, with access to much of the artist's correspondence, contends that the artist, after his marriage, rarely, if ever, had sex with models, despite his apparent feelings for many. Two Russian art collectors stood out at the beginning of the 20th century: the cloth merchant Sergei Shchukin (1854–1936) and the textile manufacturer Ivan Morozov (1871–1921). Both acquired modern French art, developed a sensibility for spotting new trends, and publicized them in Russia. In this period, Matisse had initiated his fecund association with the Russian textile magnate and visionary collector, Sergei Shchukin. The artist created one of his major works La Danse specially for Shchukin as part of a two painting commission. Inspired by a circular dance-- perhaps a sardana - performed by fishermen at Collioure, this painting embodies the clash between the sacred and reality. Human hands link together, but they form a divine spirit. Moreover, Matisse all but abandoned perspective The work ’s flatness emphasizes the idea, colors, and material, a notion that made Matisse a model for Modernists. The other painting commissioned was Music, 1909. Shchukin was considered by some almost as a co-producer of some of the artist’s greatest works and was strongly commuted to the French painter’s work. Concerning the violent attacks on his friend, the Russian wrote to the artist: “The public is against you, but the future is yours.” By 1914 Shchukin’s house in Moscow contained thirty-seven Matisses. “He always picked the best,” the artist said. During the political revolution Lenin expropriated Shchukin collection in person but allowed Shchukin to remain, in servants’ quarters, as caretaker and guide. He died in Paris, in 1936. The collection is now in the Hermitage and Pushkin Museums From about 1911 to 1915, Matisse struggled with the ideas of Cubism, an experiment he felt he was "not participating in" because it did not "speak to [his] deeply sensory nature." MOROCCO Like many avant-garde artists in Paris, Matisse was receptive to a broad range of influences. He is one of the first painters to take an interest in various forms of “primitive” art. His art was profoundly influenced by Easter art...
Category

Mid-20th Century Modern (after) Henri Matisse Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

lithograph for Florilege des amours de Ronsard
By (after) Henri Matisse
Located in Henderson, NV
Medium: lithograph (after Matisse). Printed in sanguine ink on cream laid paper from the Papeteries Casteljoux and published in Geneva by Edito-Service in 1970. This reproduces one o...
Category

1970s (after) Henri Matisse Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

lithograph for Florilege des amours de Ronsard
By (after) Henri Matisse
Located in Henderson, NV
Medium: lithograph (after Matisse). Printed in sanguine ink on cream laid paper from the Papeteries Casteljoux and published in Geneva by Edito-Service in 1970. This reproduces one o...
Category

1970s (after) Henri Matisse Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

Henri Matisse (After) - Lithograph - Flowers
By (after) Henri Matisse
Located in Collonge Bellerive, Geneve, CH
after Henri MATISSE (1869-1954) Lithograph after a drawing of 1941 Printed signature and date Book plate from Aragon. Henri Matisse: Dessins, Thèmes et Variations : précédés d...
Category

1940s Modern (after) Henri Matisse Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

Nu bleu, la grenouille (Blue Nude, The Frog)
By (after) Henri Matisse
Located in Washington, DC
Artist: Henri Matisse (after) Title: Nu bleu, la grenouille (Blue Nude, The Frog) Portfolio: The Last Works of Henri Matisse Medium: Lithograph Date: 195...
Category

1950s (after) Henri Matisse Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

"De la Couleur" pochoir
By (after) Henri Matisse
Located in Henderson, NV
Medium: pochoir. Published in Paris in 1945 by Teriade for Verve (Volume IV, No. 13). This was the title page composed by Matisse for the special "De la Couleur" issue, now rare. Pri...
Category

1940s (after) Henri Matisse Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph, Stencil

"The Two Sisters" lithograph
By (after) Henri Matisse
Located in Henderson, NV
Medium: lithograph (after the painting). Printed in Paris on smooth wove paper at the atelier Mourlot and published in 1954. Size: 6 1/2 x 8 inches (168 x 202 mm). Not signed. Cond...
Category

1950s (after) Henri Matisse Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

"Baigneuse dans les roseaux" lithograph
By (after) Henri Matisse
Located in Henderson, NV
Medium: lithograph (after the découpage and gouache). Printed in 1958 at the Mourlot Freres atelier and published in Paris by Teriade for the art revue Verve. Size: 14 x 20 3/4 inche...
Category

1950s (after) Henri Matisse Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

"Oeurves Recentes" lithograph poster
By (after) Henri Matisse
Located in Henderson, NV
Medium: lithograph (after the original lithograph poster). During the late 1940's and throughout the 1950's, Henri Matisse created a series of posters at the atelier of Mourlot Frere...
Category

1950s (after) Henri Matisse Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

lithograph for Florilege des amours de Ronsard
By (after) Henri Matisse
Located in Henderson, NV
Medium: lithograph (after Matisse). Printed in sanguine ink on cream laid paper from the Papeteries Casteljoux and published in Geneva by Edito-Service in 1970. This reproduces one o...
Category

1970s (after) Henri Matisse Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

"Bal de L'Ecole des Arts Decoratifs" lithograph poster
By (after) Henri Matisse
Located in Henderson, NV
Medium: lithograph (after the original lithograph poster executed for the Annual Ball of the School of Decorative Arts, of Paris). During the late 1940's and throughout the 1950's, H...
Category

1950s (after) Henri Matisse Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

"Lagoon" from Jazz
By (after) Henri Matisse
Located in Henderson, NV
This lithograph (after the 1947 pochoir) is from the 1983 edition, published in New York by The Museum of Modern Art. The original 1947 edition of Matisse "Jazz" is now so rare it is...
Category

1980s (after) Henri Matisse Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

"The Swimmer in the Tank" from Jazz
By (after) Henri Matisse
Located in Henderson, NV
This lithograph (after the 1947 pochoir) is from the 1983 edition, published in New York by The Museum of Modern Art. The original 1947 edition of Matisse "Jazz" is now so rare it is...
Category

1980s (after) Henri Matisse Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

"Oliviers" pochoir
By (after) Henri Matisse
Located in Henderson, NV
Medium: pochoir (after the watercolor). Published in Paris in 1924 by Albert Morance for "L'Art d'Aujourd'hui", and now very scarce. The publisher's provenance inscription is printed...
Category

1920s (after) Henri Matisse Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph, Stencil

"Sculpture of Matisse" lithograph poster
By (after) Henri Matisse
Located in Henderson, NV
Medium: lithograph (after the original lithograph poster for the Tate Gallery Matisse sculpture show). During the late 1940's and throughout the 1950's, Henri Matisse created a serie...
Category

1950s (after) Henri Matisse Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

"Jazz" lithograph poster
By (after) Henri Matisse
Located in Henderson, NV
Medium: lithograph (after the original lithograph poster). During the late 1940's and throughout the 1950's, Henri Matisse created a series of posters at the atelier of Mourlot Frere...
Category

1950s (after) Henri Matisse Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

"La seance du matin" pochoir
By (after) Henri Matisse
Located in Henderson, NV
Medium: pochoir (after the watercolor). Published in Paris in 1924 by Albert Morance for "L'Art d'Aujourd'hui", and now very scarce. The publisher's provenance inscription is printed...
Category

1920s (after) Henri Matisse Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph, Stencil

lithograph for Florilege des amours de Ronsard
By (after) Henri Matisse
Located in Henderson, NV
Medium: lithograph (after Matisse). Printed in sanguine ink on cream laid paper from the Papeteries Casteljoux and published in Geneva by Edito-Service in 1970. This reproduces one o...
Category

1970s (after) Henri Matisse Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

"Pierre Matisse" lithograph
By (after) Henri Matisse
Located in Henderson, NV
Medium: lithograph (after the painting). Printed in Paris on smooth wove paper at the atelier Mourlot and published in 1954. Size: 9 x 7 inches (228 x 178 mm). Not signed. Conditio...
Category

1950s (after) Henri Matisse Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

Henri Matisse (after) La Perruch et la Sirene
By (after) Henri Matisse
Located in Washington, DC
Artist: Henri Matisse (after) Title: La Perruch et la Sirene Portfolio: The Last Works of Henri Matisse Medium: Lithograph Date: 1958 Edition: 2000 Frame Size: 20" x 36 3/4" Sheet Si...
Category

1950s Abstract (after) Henri Matisse Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

"Maison de la Pensee" lithograph poster
By (after) Henri Matisse
Located in Henderson, NV
Medium: lithograph (after the original lithograph poster executed for Maison de la Pensee of Paris). During the late 1940's and throughout the 1950's, Henri Matisse created a series ...
Category

1950s (after) Henri Matisse Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

"Icarus" lithograph
By (after) Henri Matisse
Located in Henderson, NV
Medium: lithograph (after the découpage). Printed in 1945; Matisse executed this composition for the cover of the art revue Verve (Volume IV, Number 13 -- the "De la Couleur" issue)....
Category

1940s (after) Henri Matisse Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

La Chevelure - Color Lithograph - 2007 - Henri Matisse
By (after) Henri Matisse
Located in Sint-Truiden, BE
Color lithograph after the work by Henri Matisse, plate-signed by Matisse from the edition of 200. This lithograph was printed and published in 2007 in Paris using 100% cotton 300 g...
Category

Early 2000s Fauvist (after) Henri Matisse Prints and Multiples

Materials

Handmade Paper, Lithograph

Nu Bleu II- plate signed - Henri Matisse Color Lithograph - 2007
By (after) Henri Matisse
Located in Sint-Truiden, BE
Color lithograph after the work by Henri Matisse, plate-signed by Matisse. This lithograph was printed and published in 2007 using 100% cotton 300 g/m² BFK Rives paper. Artwork entirely made in France: from the production of the paper in Arches in the Vosges department, to the traditional lithographic printing process, one drawing for each different color, one color per press run. The Blue Nudes...
Category

Early 2000s Fauvist (after) Henri Matisse Prints and Multiples

Materials

Handmade Paper

"Exposition D'Affiches" lithograph poster
By (after) Henri Matisse
Located in Henderson, NV
Medium: lithograph (after the original lithograph poster) for the Exposition d'Affiches. During the late 1940's and throughout the 1950's, Henri Matisse created a series of posters a...
Category

1950s (after) Henri Matisse Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

lithograph
By (after) Henri Matisse
Located in Henderson, NV
Medium: lithograph (after the découpage). This impression was printed in 1954 for XXe Siecle (issue No. 4) and published in Paris by San Lazzaro. The full sheet measures 12 3/8 x 9 1...
Category

1950s (after) Henri Matisse Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

Henri Matisse's 1985 original exhibition poster for 'Décoration Masques 1953'
By (after) Henri Matisse
Located in PARIS, FR
Henri Matisse's 1985 original poster for 'Décoration Masques 1953' is a masterpiece that offers a glimpse into the creative genius of one of the 20th century's most celebrated artist...
Category

1980s (after) Henri Matisse Prints and Multiples

Materials

Paper, Lithograph

Henri Matisse (after) La Piscine II
By (after) Henri Matisse
Located in Washington, DC
Artist: Henri Matisse (after) Title: La Piscine II Portfolio: The Last Works of Henri Matisse Medium: Lithograph Date: 1958 Edition: 2000 Sheet Size: 14" x 42" Signature: No Referenc...
Category

1950s Abstract (after) Henri Matisse Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

Henri Matisse (after) Danseuse Creole
By (after) Henri Matisse
Located in Washington, DC
Artist: Henri Matisse (after) Title: Danseuse Creole Portfolio: The Last Works of Henri Matisse Medium: Lithograph Date: 1958 Edition: 2000 Frame Size: 21 1/4" x 17" Sheet Size: 14" ...
Category

1950s Abstract (after) Henri Matisse Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

lithograph for Florilege des amours de Ronsard
By (after) Henri Matisse
Located in Henderson, NV
Medium: lithograph (after Matisse). Printed in sanguine ink on cream laid paper from the Papeteries Casteljoux and published in Geneva by Edito-Service in 1970. This reproduces one o...
Category

1970s (after) Henri Matisse Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

Souvenirs d'Oceanie
By (after) Henri Matisse
Located in Washington, DC
Artist: Henri Matisse (after) Title: Souvenirs d'Oceanie Portfolio: The Last Works of Henri Matisse Medium: Lithograph Year: 1958 Edition: 2000 Framed Size: 17" x 17" Sheet Size: 14"...
Category

1950s Modern (after) Henri Matisse Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

lithograph for Florilege des amours de Ronsard
By (after) Henri Matisse
Located in Henderson, NV
Medium: lithograph (after Matisse). Printed in sanguine ink on cream laid paper from the Papeteries Casteljoux and published in Geneva by Edito-Service in 1970. This reproduces one o...
Category

1970s (after) Henri Matisse Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

"Rosace" lithograph
By (after) Henri Matisse
Located in Henderson, NV
Medium: lithograph (after the decoupage and gouache). Printed in 1958 at the Mourlot Freres atelier and published in Paris by Teriade for the art revue Verve. Size: 14 x 10 1/4 inche...
Category

1950s (after) Henri Matisse Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

lithograph for Verve
By (after) Henri Matisse
Located in Henderson, NV
Medium: lithograph (after the decoupage). Matisse executed this composition in 1940 especially for the front cover of Verve (number 8). Sheet size: 13 3/4 x 10 inches (350 x 256 mm);...
Category

1940s (after) Henri Matisse Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

"Exposition de Dessins" lithograph poster
By (after) Henri Matisse
Located in Henderson, NV
Medium: lithograph (after the original lithograph poster). During the late 1940's and throughout the 1950's, Henri Matisse created a series of posters at the atelier of Mourlot Frere...
Category

1950s (after) Henri Matisse Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

Henri Matisse (after) Cocquelicots
By (after) Henri Matisse
Located in Washington, DC
Artist: Henri Matisse (after) Title: Cocquelicots Portfolio: The Last Works of Henri Matisse Medium: Lithograph Date: 1958 Edition: 2000 Frame Size: 17 1/2" x 28 1/4" Sheet Size: 14"...
Category

1950s Abstract (after) Henri Matisse Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

lithograph for Florilege des amours de Ronsard
By (after) Henri Matisse
Located in Henderson, NV
Medium: lithograph (after Matisse). Printed in sanguine ink on cream laid paper from the Papeteries Casteljoux and published in Geneva by Edito-Service in 1970. This reproduces one o...
Category

1970s (after) Henri Matisse Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

Henri Matisse (after) Acanthes
By (after) Henri Matisse
Located in Washington, DC
Artist: Henri Matisse (after) Title: Acanthes Portfolio: The Last Works of Henri Matisse Medium: Lithograph Date: 1958 Edition: 2000 Sheet Size: 14" x 10 1/2" Signature: No Reference...
Category

1950s Abstract (after) Henri Matisse Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

lithograph for Florilege des amours de Ronsard
By (after) Henri Matisse
Located in Henderson, NV
Medium: lithograph (after the the original lithograph). Printed in sanguine ink on cream laid paper from the Papeteries Casteljoux and published in Geneva by Edito-Service in 1970. T...
Category

1970s (after) Henri Matisse Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

Lierre
By (after) Henri Matisse
Located in Washington, DC
Artist: Henri Matisse (after) Medium: Original lithograph Title: Lierre Portfolio: The Last Works of Henri Matisse Year: 1958 Edition: 2000 Framed Size: 17" x 17" Sheet Size: 14" x 1...
Category

1950s Fauvist (after) Henri Matisse Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

lithograph for Florilege des amours de Ronsard
By (after) Henri Matisse
Located in Henderson, NV
Medium: lithograph (after Matisse). Printed in sanguine ink on cream laid paper from the Papeteries Casteljoux and published in Geneva by Edito-Service in 1970. This reproduces one o...
Category

1970s (after) Henri Matisse Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

lithograph for Florilege des amours de Ronsard
By (after) Henri Matisse
Located in Henderson, NV
Medium: lithograph (after Matisse). Printed in sanguine ink on cream laid paper from the Papeteries Casteljoux and published in Geneva by Edito-Service in 1970. This reproduces one o...
Category

1970s (after) Henri Matisse Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

lithograph for Florilege des amours de Ronsard
By (after) Henri Matisse
Located in Henderson, NV
Medium: lithograph (after Matisse). Printed in sanguine ink on cream laid paper from the Papeteries Casteljoux and published in Geneva by Edito-Service in 1970. This reproduces one o...
Category

1970s (after) Henri Matisse Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

lithograph for Florilege des amours de Ronsard
By (after) Henri Matisse
Located in Henderson, NV
Medium: lithograph (after Matisse). Printed in sanguine ink on cream laid paper from the Papeteries Casteljoux and published in Geneva by Edito-Service in 1970. This reproduces one o...
Category

1970s (after) Henri Matisse Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

lithograph for Florilege des amours de Ronsard
By (after) Henri Matisse
Located in Henderson, NV
Medium: lithograph (after Matisse). Printed in sanguine ink on cream laid paper from the Papeteries Casteljoux and published in Geneva by Edito-Service in 1970. This reproduces one o...
Category

1970s (after) Henri Matisse Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

lithograph for Florilege des amours de Ronsard
By (after) Henri Matisse
Located in Henderson, NV
Medium: lithograph (after Matisse). Printed in sanguine ink on cream laid paper from the Papeteries Casteljoux and published in Geneva by Edito-Service in 1970. This reproduces one o...
Category

1970s (after) Henri Matisse Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

lithograph for Florilege des amours de Ronsard
By (after) Henri Matisse
Located in Henderson, NV
Medium: lithograph (after Matisse). Printed in sanguine ink on cream laid paper from the Papeteries Casteljoux and published in Geneva by Edito-Service in 1970. This reproduces one o...
Category

1970s (after) Henri Matisse Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

Henri Matisse (after) Zulma
By (after) Henri Matisse
Located in Washington, DC
Artist: Henri Matisse (after) Title: Zulma Portfolio: The Last Works of Henri Matisse Medium: Lithograph Date: 1958 Edition: 2000 Frame Size: 21" x 15" Sheet Size: 14" x 10 1/2" Sign...
Category

1950s Abstract (after) Henri Matisse Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

"Horse, Rider and Clown" from Jazz
By (after) Henri Matisse
Located in Henderson, NV
This lithograph (after the 1947 pochoir) is from the 1983 edition, published in New York by The Museum of Modern Art. The original 1947 edition of Matisse "Jazz" is now so rare it is...
Category

1980s (after) Henri Matisse Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

Lierre en Fleur (Ivy Flowers)
By (after) Henri Matisse
Located in Washington, DC
Artist: Henri Matisse (after) Medium: Original lithograph Title: Lierre en Fleur Portfolio: The Last Works of Henri Matisse Year: 1958 Edition: 2000 Framed Size: 17 1/2" x 17 1/2" Sh...
Category

1950s Fauvist (after) Henri Matisse Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

L'escargot - lithograph from latest works of Matisse modern abstract art
By (after) Henri Matisse
Located in Hamburg, DE
"L'Escargo" is a color lithograph signed in the plate by Henri Matisse. It is an original lithograph based on his paper-cut-out from 1950. Matisse originally painted these works wi...
Category

20th Century (after) Henri Matisse Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

"The Clown" from Jazz
By (after) Henri Matisse
Located in Henderson, NV
This lithograph (after the 1947 pochoir) is from the 1983 edition, published in New York by The Museum of Modern Art. The original 1947 edition of Matisse "Jazz" is now so rare it is...
Category

1980s (after) Henri Matisse Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

"The Wolf" from Jazz
By (after) Henri Matisse
Located in Henderson, NV
This lithograph (after the 1947 pochoir) is from the 1983 edition, published in New York by The Museum of Modern Art. The original 1947 edition of Matisse "Jazz" is now so rare it is...
Category

1980s (after) Henri Matisse Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

Henri Matisse (after) Rosace
By (after) Henri Matisse
Located in Washington, DC
Artist: Henri Matisse (after) Title: Rosace Portfolio: The Last Works of Henri Matisse Medium: Lithograph Date: 1958 Edition: 2000 Frame Size: 17 3/4" x 17 3/4" Sheet Size: 14" x 10 ...
Category

1950s Abstract (after) Henri Matisse Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

lithograph for Florilege des amours de Ronsard
By (after) Henri Matisse
Located in Henderson, NV
Medium: lithograph (after Matisse). Printed in sanguine ink on cream laid paper from the Papeteries Casteljoux and published in Geneva by Edito-Service in 1970. This reproduces one o...
Category

1970s (after) Henri Matisse Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

Souvenir d'Océanie- lithograph from latest works of Matisse modern abstract art
By (after) Henri Matisse
Located in Hamburg, DE
"Souvenir d'Océanie" is a color lithograph signed in the plate by Henri Matisse. It is an original lithograph based on his paper-cut-out from 1950. Matisse originally painted these...
Category

20th Century Abstract Impressionist (after) Henri Matisse Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

L'Acrobate - Color Lithograph - 2007 - Henri Matisse
By (after) Henri Matisse
Located in Sint-Truiden, BE
Color lithograph after the work by Henri Matisse, plate-signed by Matisse from the edition of 200. This lithograph was printed and published in 2007 in Paris using 100% cotton 300 g...
Category

Early 2000s Fauvist (after) Henri Matisse Prints and Multiples

Materials

Handmade Paper, Lithograph

after Henri Matisse - Sleeping Blue Nude - Lithograph
By (after) Henri Matisse
Located in Collonge Bellerive, Geneve, CH
after Henri MATISSE Edition of 200 with the printed signature, as issued 76 x 56 cm With stamp of the Succession Matisse References : Artvalue - Succession Matisse
Category

1950s Modern (after) Henri Matisse Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

(after) Henri Matisse prints and multiples for sale on 1stDibs.

Find a wide variety of authentic (after) Henri Matisse prints and multiples available for sale on 1stDibs. If you’re browsing the collection of prints and multiples to introduce a pop of color in a neutral corner of your living room or bedroom, you can find work that includes elements of blue, purple, yellow and other colors. You can also browse by medium to find art by (after) Henri Matisse in lithograph, paper, handmade paper and more. Much of the original work by this artist or collective was created during the 20th century and is mostly associated with the modern style. Not every interior allows for large (after) Henri Matisse prints and multiples, so small editions measuring 4 inches across are available. (after) Henri Matisse prints and multiples prices can differ depending upon medium, time period and other attributes. On 1stDibs, the price for these items starts at $75 and tops out at $19,000, while the average work can sell for $100.
Questions About (after) Henri Matisse Prints and Multiples
  • 1stDibs ExpertApril 22, 2024
    Henri Matisse was famous for his work as a draftsman, sculptor, printmaker and painter. He is especially well known for his use of color. Although classically trained at the Académie Julian in Paris, he quickly abandoned traditional techniques and genres to pioneer a style all his own, marked by quick gestural strokes and fluid contours. Along with fellow painter André Derain, Matisse was the leading proponent of Fauvism, a movement whose name is derived from the French word for "wild beast." Marked by vibrant hues, Fauvist paintings like Matisse's famous 1906 composition Le bonheur de vivre use wild, active brushstrokes and a palette unconstrained by nature. Shop an assortment of Henri Matisse art on 1stDibs.
  • 1stDibs ExpertApril 5, 2022
    Henri Matisse, throughout his decades-long career, had a number of different impacts upon the art world. However, his seminal works in so-called Fauvism (French for ‘wild beast’) set him apart from the start. With strident use of color and seemingly wild brushwork, works from Matisse’s formative periods are among the most highly sought after by collectors. You’ll find a collection of expertly-vetted Matisse pieces from some of the world’s top dealers on 1stDibs.
  • 1stDibs ExpertFebruary 7, 2024
    Henri Matisse's art style is associated with several movements, including Postimpressionism and Fauvism. He was also the leading proponent of Fauvism, a movement with a name derived from the French word for "wild beast." Marked by vibrant hues, Fauvist paintings like Matisse's famous 1906 composition Le Bonheur de Vivre use wild, active brushstrokes and a palette unconstrained by nature, resulting in women with purple skin and trees with orange leaves. Often, these compositions unite pure color with the white of the exposed canvas to create a sense of transparency and light. Shop a variety of Henri Matisse art on 1stDibs.
  • 1stDibs ExpertApril 5, 2022
    Henri Matisse created Icarus in 1947. It was printed using a stencil technique and was later included among 20 other pieces in his book Jazz. Shop a selection of Matisse’s pieces from some of the world’s top art dealers on 1stDibs.
  • 1stDibs ExpertFebruary 7, 2024
    Some of Henri Matisse's most famous paintings include Le Bonheur de Vivre, Blue Nude (Souvenir de Biskra), Woman with a Hat, Music, The Green Stripe and L'Atelier Rouge. Matisse also worked as a draftsman, printmaker and sculptor. Regardless of what medium he was working in, the French artist was a master of color. Although classically trained at the Académie Julian in Paris, he abandoned traditional techniques and genres to pioneer a style all his own, marked by quick gestural strokes and fluid contours. Find an assortment of Henri Matisse art on 1stDibs.
  • 1stDibs ExpertFebruary 27, 2024
    Henri Matisse stopped painting due to health concerns. In 1941, the French artist required surgery for cancer and used a wheelchair afterward. The physical limitations of his disability made it difficult for the artist to continue to produce both paintings and sculptures. However, he adapted by cutting shapes from colored paper for creative new works. On 1stDibs, find a selection of Henri Matisse art from some of the world's top dealers and galleries.
  • 1stDibs ExpertApril 5, 2022
    Henri Matisse's last painting was completed in 1951, and was titled Woman in Yellow Blouse. He also created a piece called The Swimming Pool, in 1952, which featured cutouts of divers and sea creatures in hues of blue. Shop a selection of Henri Matisse pieces from some of the world’s top art dealers on 1stDibs.
  • 1stDibs ExpertApril 5, 2022
    Henri Matisse's artistic style is largely classified as Fauvism. His colorful, expressive paintings also helped to influence Expressionist art. Some of the French artist's most famous paintings include Blue Nudes, La Danse and Le Bonheur de Vivre. Find a collection of Henri Matisse on 1stDibs.
  • 1stDibs ExpertFebruary 1, 2024
    Matisse was influenced by a number of other artists, including Vincent van Gogh, Paul Cézanne, Paul Gaugin, Paul Signac and Gustave Moreau. The French painter, sculptor and craftsman also drew inspiration from the flattened forms of figures in medieval and early Renaissance paintings, such as in how he approached nudes. Rejecting strict realism, he distilled forms into their essential parts and then translated these into voluptuous, rounded contours. Explore a range of Henri Matisse art on 1stDibs.
  • 1stDibs ExpertApril 16, 2024
    Matisse influenced a large number of artists. During his lifetime, his paintings, marked by quick, gestural strokes and fluid contours, informed many of his contemporaries in the Fauvist movement, such as Albert Marquet and Georges Rouault. Matisse's influence can also be seen in the works of Wassily Kandinsky, Marc Chagall, David Hockney, Richard Diebenkorn and Juan Gris. French fashion designer Yves Saint Laurent also drew inspiration from Matisse's pieces. On 1stDibs, shop a collection of Henri Matisse art.
  • If it's an original Matisse painting it would cost many millions of dollars. Even the simple sketches are worth hundreds of thousands and are highly collected. His pencil drawings are the most affordable of his originals and are priced in the tens of thousands to the hundreds of thousands depending on the importance of the piece.
  • 1stDibs ExpertApril 5, 2022
    Matisse originally used cut-outs to plot his paintings, but as he aged he found it more difficult to paint and turned to cut-outs as his primary form of art. Using sheets of paper and scissors, he would cut-out shapes and then arrange them onto paper or a canvas. He did have assistants paint the pieces of paper in his later years as his range of movement was severely restricted but his artistic vision was not. Shop a selection of Matisse pieces from some of the world’s top art dealers on 1stDibs.
  • 1stDibs ExpertFebruary 22, 2021
    A Matisse painting is typically worth anywhere from a few thousand dollars to $1 million, on average. Matisse's “L'Odlisque, harmonie bleue” fetched $33.6 million dollars at auction. Therefore, the price of a Matisse painting can vary depending on period, condition, and style.
  • 1stDibs ExpertFebruary 13, 2024
    The exact number of paintings that Matisse painted isn't known. Art historians have determined that the French artist produced at least 1,000 works over the course of his life. Roughly half of these pieces are thought to be paintings. Some of his most famous paintings include Le Bonheur de Vive, Blue Nude, The Green Stripe and L'Atelier Rouge. Explore an assortment of Henri Matisse art on 1stDibs.
  • 1stDibs ExpertApril 5, 2022
    Sean Henry is a British sculptor born in Woking, UK, in 1965. Today, he works in Hampshire, England, and is best known for producing emotional portrait sculptures that are incredibly lifelike. On 1stDibs, find a range of Sean Henry art.
  • 1stDibs ExpertMarch 22, 2022
    Henri Matisse made more than 100 cut-outs. The French artist began producing them in the 1930s and continued to create them until his death in 1954. He described his process as "cutting into color." On 1stDibs, find a range of Henri Matisse art.
  • 1stDibs ExpertFebruary 7, 2024
    Henri Rousseau was famous for his jungle-set fantasy paintings in what’s known as the Naïve manner. These works drew inspiration from the paintings of Paul Gaugin and depict lush, colorful scenes that are home to fantastic beasts and bold figures. Examples include The Snake Charmer, The Dream, The Equatorial Jungle, Tiger in a Tropical Storm, Surprised! and The Repast of the Lion. On 1stDibs, find a wide variety of fine art from some of the world's top dealers and galleries.
  • 1stDibs ExpertApril 5, 2022
    Henry Raeburn is famous for his work as a portrait artist. King George IV made the Scottish artist his official portrait painter based in Scotland. Raeburn was born 1756 and died in 1823. Find a range of Henry Raeburn art on 1stDibs.
  • 1stDibs ExpertFebruary 1, 2024
    L Brands bought Henri Bendel. The acquisition took place in 1985, and L Brands continued to operate Henri Bendel stores for the next three decades. In 2018, L Brands announced the closure of Henri Bendel, with its 23 stores and official website shuttering in 2019. On 1stDibs, shop a range of Henri Bendel apparel, accessories and jewelry.
  • 1stDibs ExpertApril 5, 2022
    Henri Cartier-Bresson was a French photographer who focused on real-life situations and images, helping establish photojournalism as an art form. He was a pioneer in this realm and was very adept at capturing the moment. He covered many of the world’s biggest events in his lifetime, including the Spanish Civil War to the French uprisings of 1968. On 1stDibs, find a variety of original artwork from top artists.

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