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Robert Indiana
"New York City Center 25th Anniversary"

1968

About the Item

Robert Indiana "New York City Center 25th Anniversary" New York City Center, 1968 Silkscreen Poster 35 x 25 inches Unsigned This poster is printed on thick paper.
  • Creator:
    Robert Indiana (1928 - 2018, American)
  • Creation Year:
    1968
  • Dimensions:
    Height: 35 in (88.9 cm)Width: 25 in (63.5 cm)
  • Medium:
  • Movement & Style:
  • Period:
  • Condition:
    Additional images available upon request.
  • Gallery Location:
    New York, NY
  • Reference Number:
    1stDibs: LU116824580112
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