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Greg Frederick

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Adele Canvas by Greg Frederick, 2022
By Greg Frederick
Located in New York, NY
Created out of vinyl records and their packaging on a 24x24" canvas set in a black floater frame.
Category

2010s Pop Art Mixed Media

Materials

Canvas

Sade Canvas by Greg Frederick, 2021
By Greg Frederick
Located in New York, NY
Created out of her unplayable vinyl records and their packaging on 48 x 48" canvas set in a white floater frame.
Category

2010s Pop Art Mixed Media

Materials

Canvas

Tori Amos Canvas by Greg Frederick, 2022
By Greg Frederick
Located in New York, NY
Created out of unplayable vinyl records and their packaging on a 11 x 14 canvas set in a black floater frame
Category

2010s Pop Art Mixed Media

Materials

Canvas

David Bowie Canvas by Greg Frederick, 2021
By Greg Frederick
Located in New York, NY
Created out of Vinyl records and their packing on 36 x 36 canvas
Category

2010s Pop Art Mixed Media

Materials

Canvas

Jerry Garcia Wood Panel by Greg Frederick, 2022
By Greg Frederick
Located in New York, NY
Created out of vinyl records and their packaging on a 36 x 36 wood panel
Category

2010s Pop Art Mixed Media

Materials

Wood Panel

Eddie Vedder Canvas by Greg Frederick, 2022 (Pearl Jam)
By Greg Frederick
Located in New York, NY
Created out of Vinyl records and their packing on 24 x 36 canvas Unique original artwork
Category

2010s Pop Art Mixed Media

Materials

Canvas

Frederick Collier, 21st Century, Contemporary, Celebrity, Photography
By Greg Gorman
Located in Munich, DE
Edition 25 A nude male model is standing in in the shade of a blind. From personality portraits and advertising campaigns to magazine layouts and fine art work, Greg Gorman has dev...
Category

21st Century and Contemporary Contemporary Nude Photography

Materials

Archival Pigment

Madonna
By Greg Frederick
Located in New York, NY
Created out of Madonna’s unplayable vinyl records and their packaging on 48x48" canvas set in a white floater frame.
Category

2010s Pop Art Mixed Media

Materials

Canvas

  • Madonna
  • Madonna
  • Madonna
  • Madonna
H 48 in. W 48 in. D 2 in.

A Close Look at pop-art Art

Perhaps one of the most influential contemporary-art movements, Pop art emerged in the 1950s. In stark contrast to traditional artistic practice, it drew on imagery from popular culture — comic books, advertising, product packaging and other commercial media — to create paintings and sculptures that celebrated ordinary life in the most literal way.

Pop art started in Britain as a reaction, both positive and critical, to the period’s consumerism. Its goal was to put popular culture on the same level as so-called high culture.

Richard Hamilton’s 1956 collage Just what is it that makes today’s homes so different, so appealing? is widely believed to have kickstarted this unconventional new style.

Pop art works are distinguished by their bold imagery, bright colors and seemingly commonplace subject matter. Practitioners sought to challenge the status quo, breaking with the perceived elitism of the previously dominant Abstract Expressionism and making statements about current events. Other key characteristics of Pop art include appropriation of imagery and techniques from popular and commercial culture; use of different media and formats; repetition in imagery and iconography; incorporation of mundane objects from advertisements, cartoons and other popular media; hard edges; and ironic and witty treatment of subject matter.

Although British artists launched the movement, they were soon overshadowed by their American counterparts. Pop art is perhaps most closely identified with Andy Warhol, whose clever appropriation of motifs and images helped to transform the artistic style into a lifestyle. Most of the best-known Pop artists started in commercial art (Warhol made whimsical drawings as a hobby during his early years as a commercial illustrator), a background that helped them in merging high and popular culture.

Roy Lichtenstein was another prominent American Pop artist. Much like Warhol, Lichtenstein drew his subjects from print media, particularly comic strips, producing paintings and sculptures characterized by primary colors, bold outlines and halftone dots, elements appropriated from commercial printing. Recontextualizing a lowbrow image by importing it into a fine-art context was a trademark of his style. Neo-pop artists like Jeff Koons and Takashi Murakami further blurred the line between art and popular culture.

Pop art rose to prominence largely through the work of a handful of men creating works that were unemotional and distanced — in other words, stereotypically masculine. However, there were many important female Pop artists, such as Rosalyn Drexler, whose significant contributions to the movement are recognized today. Best known for her work as a playwright and novelist, Drexler also created paintings and collages embodying Pop art themes and stylistic features.

Read more about the history of Pop art and the style’s famous artists, and browse a collection of Pop art prints, photography and other works on 1stDibs.

Finding the Right Mixed Media for You

Mixed media is a type of art that sees artists using a range of materials or more than one medium. Find a range of mixed media paintings and other artworks for your space today on 1stDibs.

Mixed media is distinct from multimedia, which describes art involving electronic media, including video, computers and digital elements. Artists combine painting, drawing, photography and sculpture for mixed media art. Instead of sticking to one form, they aim to break boundaries and create unique pieces. Pop art is one of the vibrant periods for mixed media art, with Jasper Johns and Robert Rauschenberg among its most fabled producers. Rauschenberg, like many mixed media artists, used found objects in his work, from cast-off furniture to newspapers.

Collage is one of the most well-known areas of mixed media. Artists use various types of paper, fabric, photographs and more to create one cohesive work. A type of collage is assemblage, which involves 3D objects.

While artists may use fabric in collage, it can be the very substance of the art itself. Fabric art makes extensive use of texture. Artists may paint or embroider on fabric to create layers of texture and color to evoke a specific feeling. They can also transfer photos onto fabric for innovative ways to display visuals.

Resin-based art has clean, sharp lines and a definitive shape. Resin is a liquid that hardens to a high-gloss surface and is used to seal wood, counters and floors. Resin can also seal artwork, and many artists tint it using pigment powder, ink, spray paint and other vivid materials. If water is added, the resin will turn milky instead of being completely transparent. It’s common for artists working in mixed media to use resin on nontraditional surfaces like glass, wood, metal and stone. This creates a shine that’s perfect to brighten a dull space in the home or office.

Find mixed media paintings and other art for sale on 1stDibs.