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Meissen Dog

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Early 19th Century Meissen Dog
By Meissen Porcelain
Located in Kilmarnock, VA
An early 19th century Meissen King Charles Spaniel resting on a colorful tasseled cushion. The base of the piece shows evidence of extensive damage and old, poorly done repairs.
Category

Antique 19th Century German Animal Sculptures

Materials

Paint, Porcelain

  • Early 19th Century Meissen Dog
  • Early 19th Century Meissen Dog
  • Early 19th Century Meissen Dog
  • Early 19th Century Meissen Dog
H 7.5 in. W 8 in. D 5.5 in.
Antique Meissen Porcelain Figure of a Dachshund Dog
By Meissen Porcelain
Located in New York, NY
An Antique Meissen Porcelain figure of a Dachshund dog, with double blue crossed swords mark under-glaze. This is a very well portrayed Dachshund dog figure with beautifully hand pai...
Category

Vintage 1930s German Rococo Animal Sculptures

Materials

Porcelain

Meissen Porcelain Figure of German Shepherd Dog
By Meissen Porcelain
Located in New York, NY
An exquisitely crafted Meissen Porcelain figure of a German Shepherd dog from the sought after Pfeiffer Period. hand-painted underglaze in black and brown, bearing the famous blue cr...
Category

Early 20th Century German Art Nouveau Animal Sculptures

Materials

Porcelain

  • Meissen Porcelain Figure of German Shepherd Dog
  • Meissen Porcelain Figure of German Shepherd Dog
  • Meissen Porcelain Figure of German Shepherd Dog
  • Meissen Porcelain Figure of German Shepherd Dog
H 7.25 in. W 8.50 in. D 2.75 in.
Meissen Lovely Dog Figurine Terrier by Paul Walther made c. 1935
By Meissen Porcelain
Located in Vienna, AT
Meissen Lovely Figurine Of Dog: It Is A Type Of British Smooth Fox Terrier Sitting On White Oval Base / The Dog's Body Is Brownish Coloured, With Dark Markings. Model Invented...
Category

Vintage 1930s German Art Nouveau Figurative Sculptures

Materials

Porcelain

Early 1800s Meissen Porcelain Group of Pug Dog and Puppy modeled after J.J Kandler
Located in New York, NY
A Naturalistic Early 19th c. Meissen Model of a Pug and Puppy after a model by J.J Kandler, an Essential Figure in the development of Meissen Porcelain. Early 1800's Germany.
Category

Antique 19th Century German Animal Sculptures

Materials

Porcelain

19th Century Meissen Dog
By Meissen Porcelain
Located in Kilmarnock, VA
A large early 19th century Meissen model of a hound raised on an oval mounded base, crossed swords mark and "H 33" incised. Small loss at the collar and may have old repair at the tail.
Category

Antique 19th Century German Animal Sculptures

Materials

Porcelain

  • 19th Century Meissen Dog
  • 19th Century Meissen Dog
  • 19th Century Meissen Dog
  • 19th Century Meissen Dog
H 9 in. W 10 in. D 6 in.
Meissen Girl With Dog
By Meissen Porcelain
Located in Oaks, PA
Meissen figure of a girl holding a dog. In her other hand is a mirror which reflects the dog.
Category

Antique Late 19th Century German Late Victorian Figurative Sculptures

Materials

Meissen

  • Meissen Girl With Dog
  • Meissen Girl With Dog
  • Meissen Girl With Dog
  • Meissen Girl With Dog
H 5.75 in. W 2.75 in.
Meissen Porcelain French Bulldog Dog, 1930s
By Meissen Porcelain
Located in Antwerp, BE
French bulldog white porcelain dog figurine statue. Made by Company Meissen from Germany in the 1930s. Stamped and numbered.
Category

Mid-20th Century German Porcelain

Materials

Porcelain

  • Meissen Porcelain French Bulldog Dog, 1930s
  • Meissen Porcelain French Bulldog Dog, 1930s
  • Meissen Porcelain French Bulldog Dog, 1930s
  • Meissen Porcelain French Bulldog Dog, 1930s
H 4.14 in. W 4.14 in. D 4.34 in.
Meissen Porcelain Figure of a Resting Dog
By Meissen Porcelain
Located in London, GB
The greyhound wearing a blue collar, lying on a patch of greenery with flowers, with crossed sword mark to the underside.
Category

Antique 19th Century German Arts and Crafts Animal Sculptures

Materials

Porcelain

  • Meissen Porcelain Figure of a Resting Dog
  • Meissen Porcelain Figure of a Resting Dog
  • Meissen Porcelain Figure of a Resting Dog
  • Meissen Porcelain Figure of a Resting Dog
H 1.58 in. W 3.15 in. D 1.78 in.
Meissen Porcelain Model of a Bolognese Dog
By Meissen Porcelain
Located in Brighton, Sussex
Meissen Porcelain models of a Bolognese dog Unglazed bottom with blue crossed swords mark, Late 19th century, after a model by Johann Joachim Kaendler, 1761-1770.
Category

Early 20th Century German Porcelain

Materials

Porcelain

  • Meissen Porcelain Model of a Bolognese Dog
  • Meissen Porcelain Model of a Bolognese Dog
  • Meissen Porcelain Model of a Bolognese Dog
  • Meissen Porcelain Model of a Bolognese Dog
H 9.45 in. W 11.03 in. D 4.73 in.
Meissen Porcelain Girl with Mirror and Dog
By Meissen Porcelain
Located in Oaks, PA
Meissen Girl with Mirror and Dog, of exceptional quality and condition. The seated lady with her dog on her lap, with mirror at hand. Blue under glaze crossed swords with painters ma...
Category

Antique 1890s German High Victorian Porcelain

Materials

Porcelain

Meissen Dog Figurine Spaniel, Johann Joachim Kaendler Pfeiffer Period 1924-1934
By Johann Joachim Kaendler
Located in Vienna, AT
Meissen very lovely as well as gorgeous dog's figurine: So-said Spaniel dog, excellently manufactured. Measures / dimensions: height 7.48 inches / 19.0 cm width 9.055 inches / ...
Category

Early 20th Century German Rococo Porcelain

Materials

Porcelain

Meissen Porcelain Pug Dog by J.J. Kandler, circa 1750
Located in New York, NY
18th c. Meissen Porcelain Pug dog seated on a flowered and gold tasseled cushion. Gold colored rings dot the dog's collar with a blue bow positioned at the back of the neck. Molded b...
Category

Antique 18th Century and Earlier Decorative Objects

Materials

Porcelain

Meissen Couple Musicians on Settee Pug Dog Composer Hasse W 56 Kaendler
By Johann Joachim Kaendler
Located in Vienna, AT
Meissen Gorgeous Group of Gigurines: Gallant couple on settee making music. The Details Are Stunningly Sculptured = Finest Modelling Manufactory: Meissen Dating: made circa 187...
Category

Antique 1870s German Rococo Porcelain

Materials

Porcelain

Meissen Art Nouveau Hentschel Child Little Boy with Dog Model W 123
By Julius Konrad Hentschel
Located in Vienna, AT
Meissen lovely Hentschel figurine: Little boy with drinking dog Model W 123 Size: height: 3.34 inches ( 8.5 cm) width: 6.10 inches (15.5 cm) depth: 4.33 inches (11.0 cm) Ma...
Category

Antique Early 1900s German Art Nouveau Porcelain

Materials

Porcelain

Meissen Pair of Bolognese Dog Figurines by Kaendler, 20th Century
By Johann Joachim Kaendler
Located in Vienna, AT
Meissen very lovely as well as gorgeous dog figurines group: so-said bolognese dogs, excellently painted (brown-white and red brown-white) & stunningly modelled (look for example a...
Category

20th Century German Baroque Porcelain

Materials

Porcelain

Antique Dresden Porcelain Bolognese Dog Figurine
By Meissen Porcelain, Johann Joachim Kaendler
Located in Philadelphia, PA
An antique Dresden porcelain figurine of the seated 'Bolognese Dog'. A form made famous by the brilliant Meissen modeler Johann Kaendler in the 18th century. This model is a 19th ...
Category

Antique 19th Century German Baroque Animal Sculptures

Materials

Porcelain

Meissen Art Nouveau Baby Child with Dog by Paul Rumrich Model A 234
Located in Vienna, AT
Meissen lovely child figurine: baby with dog sitting on ground Model A 234 Size: height: 4.72 inches (= 12.0 cm) depth: 3.93 inches (= 10.0 cm) width: 4.72 inches (= 12.0 cm) ...
Category

Vintage 1910s Austrian Art Nouveau Porcelain

Materials

Porcelain

Meissen Hentschel Child Boy Figurine with Drinking Dog Model W 123, circa 1905
By Julius Konrad Hentschel
Located in Vienna, AT
Meissen Stunning Hentschel Figurine: Little Boy With Dog Which Is Drinking Model W 123 Measures: height 3.34 inches (8.5 cm) width 6.10 inches (15.5 cm) depth 4.33 inches (11....
Category

Early 20th Century German Art Nouveau Porcelain

Materials

Porcelain

Meissen Hentschel Child Boy Figurine with Drinking Dog Model W 123, circa 1905
By Julius Konrad Hentschel
Located in Vienna, AT
Meissen stunning Hentschel figurine: Little boy with dog which is drinking Model W 123 Measures: Height 3.34 inches (= 8.5 cm) Width 6.10 inches (= 15.5 cm) Depth 4.33 inches...
Category

Antique Early 1900s German Art Nouveau Porcelain

Materials

Porcelain

Meissen Bolognese Dog Model 2880 by Johann Joachim Kaendler Made circa 1870
By Johann Joachim Kaendler
Located in Vienna, AT
Meissen very lovely as well as gorgeous dog's figurine: It is a Bolognese Dog, excellently painted (dark brown and bright brown as well as white shaded) and stunningly modelled: L...
Category

Antique 1870s German Rococo Porcelain

Materials

Porcelain

18th Century German Meissen Floral Porcelain Potpourri with Dog and Birds
Located in Dallas, TX
Elegant antique hand-painted Meissen Porcelain potpourri from Germany, circa 1790, featuring a baluster-form floral draped urn with pierced lid rising from a rocky outcropping with b...
Category

Antique Late 18th Century German Porcelain

Materials

Porcelain

French porcelain pug dog perfume bottle, probably Samson, c. 1880
By Edmé Samson, Meissen Porcelain
Located in Geelong, Victoria
Paris porcelain perfume in the form of a pug dog, after a mid- 18th century Meissen original. Possibly Samson, c.1880
Category

Antique Late 19th Century French Rococo Snuff Boxes and Tobacco Boxes

Materials

Porcelain

Meissen Art Nouveau Baby Child with Dog by Paul Rumrich Model a 234, circa 1910
Located in Vienna, AT
Meissen lovely child figurine: baby with dog sitting on ground Model A 234 Measures: Height: 4.72 inches (= 12.0 cm) Depth: 4.52 inches (= 11.5 cm) Width: 4.13 inches (= 10.5 ...
Category

Vintage 1910s Austrian Art Nouveau Porcelain

Materials

Porcelain

Meissen Porcelain Biography and Important Works

Meissen Porcelain (Staatliche Porzellan-Manufaktur Meissen) is one of the preeminent porcelain factories in Europe and was the first to produce true porcelain outside of Asia. It was established in 1710 under the auspices of King Augustus II “the Strong” of Saxony-Poland (1670–1733), a keen collector of Asian ceramics, particularly Ming porcelain. In pursuing his passion, which he termed his “maladie de porcelaine,” Augustus spent vast sums, amassing some 20,000 pieces of Japanese and Chinese ceramics. These, along with examples of early Meissen, comprise the Porzellansammlung, or porcelain collection, of the Zwinger Palace, in Dresden.

The king was determined, however, to free the European market from its dependence on Asian imports and to give European artisans the freedom to create their own porcelain designs. To this end, he charged the scientist Ehrenfried Walther von Tschirnhaus and aspiring alchemist Johann Friedrich Böttger with the task of using local materials to produce true, hard-paste porcelain (as opposed to the soft-paste variety European ceramists in the Netherlands, Germany, France, Italy and Spain had been producing since the late Renaissance). In 1709, the pair succeeded in doing just that, employing kaolin, or “china clay.” A year later, the Meissen factory was born.

In its first decades, Meissen mostly looked to Asian models, producing wares based on Japanese Kakiemon ceramics and pieces with Chinese-inflected decorations, called chinoiseries. During the 1720s its painters drew inspiration from the works of Watteau, and the scenes of courtly life, fruits and flowers that adorned fashionable textiles and wallpaper. It was in this period that Meissen introduced its famous cobalt-blue crossed swords logo—derived from the arms of the Elector of Saxony as Arch-Marshal of the Holy Roman Empire—to distinguish its products from those of competing factories that were beginning to spring up around Europe.

By the 1730s, Meissen’s modelers and decorators had mastered the style of Asian ceramics, and Augustus encouraged them to develop a new, original aesthetic. The factory’s director, Count Heinrich von Brühl, used Johann Wilhelm Weinmann’s botanical drawings as the basis for a new line of wares with European-style surface decoration. The Blue Onion pattern (Zwiebelmuster), first produced in 1739, melded Asian and European influences, closely following patterns used in Chinese underglaze-blue porcelain, but replacing exotic flora and fruits with Western varieties (likely peaches and pomegranates, not onions) along with peonies and asters.

During the same period, head modeler Joachim Kändler (1706–75) began crafting delicate porcelain figures derived from the Italian commedia dell’arte. Often used as centerpieces on banquet tables and decorated to reflect the latest fashions in courtly dress for men and women, these figurines, they were popular in their day, and are still considered among of Meissen’s most iconic creations. Kändler also created the Swan Service, which, with its complex low-relief surface design and minimal decoration is considered a masterpiece of Baroque ceramics.

The rise of Neoclassicism in the latter half of the 18th century forced Meissen to change artistic direction and begin producing monumental vases, clocks, chandeliers and candelabra. In the 20th century, Meissen added to its 18th-century repertoire decidedly modern designs, including ones in the Art Nouveau style. The 1920s saw the introduction of numerous animal figures, such as the popular sea otter (Fischotter), which graced an East German postage stamp in the 1960s. Starting in 1933, artistic freedom was limited at the factory under the Nazi regime, and after World War II, when the region became part of East Germany, it struggled to reconcile its elite past with the values of the Communist government. In 1969, however, new artistic director Karl Petermann reintroduced the early designs and fostered a new degree of artistic license. Meissen became one of the few companies to prosper in East Germany.

Owned by the State of Saxony since reunification, in 1990, Meissen continues to produce its classic designs together with new ones developed collaboratively with artists from all over the world. In addition, through its artCAMPUS program, the factory has invited distinguished ceramic artists, such as Chris Antemann and Arlene Shechet, to work in its studios in collaboration with its skilled modelers and painters. The resulting works of contemporary sculpture are inspired by Meissen’s rich and complex legacy.

Finding the Right Sculptures for You

Styling your home with sculpture means adding a touch that can meaningfully transform the space. By introducing a sculptural work as a decorative finish to any interior, you’re making a statement, whether you tend toward the dramatic or prefer to keep things casual with modest, understated art.

A single, one-of-a-kind three-dimensional figurative sculpture mounted on your dining-room wall is a guaranteed conversation piece, while a trio of abstract works arranged on your living-room bookshelves can add spontaneity to the collection of first-edition novels or artist monographs you’re displaying as well as draw attention to them. Figurative sculptures are representational works that portray a specific person, animal or object. While decorating with busts, which are sculpted or cast figurative works, hasn’t exactly topped the list of design trends every year, busts are back. According to designer Timothy Corrigan, “They give humanity in a way that a more abstract sculpture can’t give.” Abstract sculptures, on the other hand, are not meant to show something specific. Instead, they invoke a mood or scene without directly stating what they are portraying.

Busts made of stone or metal may not seem like a good fit for your existing decor. Fortunately, there are many ways for a seemingly incongruous piece to fit in with the rest of your room’s theme. You can embrace a dramatic piece by making it the focal point of the room, or you can choose to incorporate several elements made out of the same material to create harmony in your space. If an antique or more dramatic piece doesn’t feel like you, why not opt for works comprising plastic, fiberglass or other more modern materials?

When incorporating sculpture into the design of your home — be it the playful work of auction hero and multimedia visionary KAWS, contemporary fiber art from Connecticut dealer browngrotta arts or still-life sculpture on a budget — consider proper lighting, which can bring out the distinctive aspects of your piece that deserve attention. And make sure you know how the size and form of the sculpture will affect your space in whole. If you choose a sculpture with dramatic design elements, such as sharp angles or bright colors, for example, try to better integrate this new addition by echoing those elements in the rest of your room’s design.

Get started on decorating with sculpture now — find figurative sculptures, animal sculptures and more on 1stDibs today.