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Lionel Jadot Furniture

Belgian

Lionel Jadot is as much an inventor as he is a designer. The Brussels-based furniture maker and tinkerer defies categorization with a body of work linked only by the use of repurposed materials. His one-of-a-kind chairs, statement-making tables and eclectic lamps overflow with personality and charm. Jadot is also an interior architect known for creating energetic spaces with a retro yet futuristic feel.

Jadot comes from a long line of custom furniture designers and was born in Belgium in an apartment above a design studio. As a child, he would walk through the family workshop every day after school, picking up the scrap material to experiment with in his room. He took over the family business when he was just 18, and the self-taught Jadot reveled in the freedom to create whatever designs he wanted.

At his eponymous atelier, Jadot works on projects for private homes as well as restaurants, bars and hotels. While his designs and interiors can look chaotic at first glance — with his stone chairs and imposing Organic Modern-style tables of marble and wood — the disparate elements come together in a harmonious balance underpinned by quality and craftsmanship.

In 2019, Jadot also established Zaventem Ateliers in the village of Zaventem outside of Brussels. The former industrial space has become a hub for a community of established and emerging designers and artists.

Jadot's creations are regularly exhibited at design fairs and events in Brussels and around Europe. In 2020, his Crushed Seat (2018) was presented by Todd Merrill Studio director Dallas Dunn at the Brussels Collectible Design Fair. His work was once again exhibited at the Collectible Design Fair 2021 with Antwerp-based Everyday Gallery. Jadot has also expanded into Milan, Italy, with a project called Baranzate Ateliers, which enjoyed a strong showing at Milan Design Week 2022.

On 1stDibs, find Lionel Jadot seating, tables, lighting and more.

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Creator: Lionel Jadot
Side Table 'Optic II' by Lionel Jadot, Belgium, 2021
By Lionel Jadot
Located in Antwerp, BE
Design Miami; Art design; Art Basel; Atelier Lionel Jadot; Stools; Everyday Gallery; Contemporary; Belgian design; Belgian Art; coffee table; Functional Sculpture; Artwork; Collectib...
Category

2010s Belgian Organic Modern Lionel Jadot Furniture

Materials

Metal

Contemporary Chair by Lionel Jadot 'Lost Highway' Belgian Art and Design Basel
By Lionel Jadot
Located in Antwerp, BE
Design Miami; Art design; Art Basel; Atelier Lionel Jadot; Stools; Everyday Gallery; Contemporary; Belgian design; Belgian Art; Chair; Seating; Functional Sculpture; Artwork; Collect...
Category

2010s Belgian Organic Modern Lionel Jadot Furniture

Materials

Metal

Functional Art 'SLV Chair' by Lionel Jadot, Belgium, 2021
By Lionel Jadot
Located in Antwerp, BE
Design Miami; Art Design; Art Basel; Atelier Lionel Jadot; Everyday Gallery; Contemporary; Belgian Design; Belgian Art; Chair; Functional Sculpture; Artwork; Collectible Design; Ever...
Category

2010s Belgian Organic Modern Lionel Jadot Furniture

Materials

Aluminum

Carpet 'Turkish Delight' by Lionel Jadot, Belgium, 2021
By Lionel Jadot
Located in Antwerp, BE
Design Miami; Art design; Art Basel; Atelier Lionel Jadot; Everyday Gallery; Contemporary; Belgian Design; Belgian Art; Carpet; Eclectic; Colourful; Functional Sculpture; Artwork; Co...
Category

2010s Belgian Organic Modern Lionel Jadot Furniture

Materials

Fabric

Side Table 'Optic I' by Lionel Jadot, Belgium, 2021
By Lionel Jadot
Located in Antwerp, BE
Design Miami; Art design; Art Basel; Atelier Lionel Jadot; Stools; Everyday Gallery; Contemporary; Belgian design; Belgian Art; Coffee Table; Functional Sculpture; Artwork; Collectib...
Category

2010s Belgian Organic Modern Lionel Jadot Furniture

Materials

Metal

Functional Art Chair / Throne "Left at the End of the Corridor" by Lionel Jadot
By Lionel Jadot
Located in Antwerp, BE
'Left At The End of the Corridor' conversation piece by Lionel Jadot for Everyday Gallery, 2020 Collectible Design / Functional art, Lionel Jadot for Everyday Gallery, Belgium 2020 Born in Brussels in 1969, Lionel Jadot is an interior designer, artist, designer, filmmaker, adventurer. But all at once, preferably. Lionel Jadot is firing on all cylinders. ‘I never throw anything, I pick up everything. Not having a green thumb, I’m trying cuttings, weddings against nature. I never forget a line.’ He’s inviting us in subtle, off-beat worlds, on the edge of reality. Its material is made of dilated time. A wandering spirit, he seeks a protective balance in a hostile world. It is his constant questioning: what happens to the place where we live? For Lionel Jadot, everything is object, everything is history. He draws from other places, other times, and seeks what’s linking them. He sews, stitches, unpicks, blends materials, combines eras. He will enshrine some wood essence in metal, some mineral in a plant, the old in the new. ‘I take extra care to the joint between two materials.’ With him, there is always some play in the parts, as in a piece of machinery. From a kingdom to another, he provokes organic, viral growths, generating energy. Linking past and future, he never forgets a line. ‘I accumulate them.’ He’s inviting us in subtle worlds, off-beat, on the edge of reality. Are we in 1930 or in 2030? Both, no doubt. Its material is made of dilated time. The eye goes hand in hand with the ear. ‘When I walk into a place, I listen to the good (or bad) it does to me. An ineffable feeling.’ He recreates mutant buildings, like the future Royal Botanique, a 5 stars hotel housed in the Church of the Gesu, a former convent behind a 1940 façade. He talks about a ‘hotel object’, which he holds and turns around in his hand. A wandering spirit, he’s flirting with retro-futurism. The Jam, another hotel, is intended for urban travelers, fans of swiftness, fluidity and hospitality. He designs interiors as a set of objects: a motorcycle cut in concrete becomes a bar counter. He finds gothic cartoon echoes, from the likes of Moebius, Alejandro Jodorowsky, Enki Bilal, sets from Garage Hermétique and Blade Runner, a protective balance in a hostile world. Discovering Jadot’s little cosmos of collected and accumulated goods, it becomes clear that every element has its own story. I tried to collect them and in turn, devour them in the coming paragraphs. But first: the show is best experienced seated, barring the distinction between object of use and object of attention, they invite for different types of conversation. The seats, chairs, thrones all make us think of our own physical comportment, and of how the seat lends grandeur to the person sitting on it, by crowning its presence. The crackling floor, the felt walls and the diffuse light slow you down into an oddly absorbing environment, in which you are left puzzled. In the eclectic collages of objects, bits and pieces collected all over the world come together in ways practical, and logical, though possibly only in the artist’s mind. All his finds eventually seem to fall into place. Starting with the mere conception of a chair, rather than with a set-out plan or sketch, the works are intuitively construed out of an archive that one can only imagine the dimensions of. Things forgotten by others, precious for him, were all once designed for their own purpose. Here they find their fit as a base, a closing system or a balancing element. The first piece that opens the exhibition, the most throne-like of all seats in the show, builds around a chair of his grandmother, protected by mops, and harassed with bed springs. As you enter the space, you pass by a shell leaning over a yellow seat that stems from his old Mustang, and find a white stool piece with Mexican leather dog training whips— the white building blocks of which turn out to be dried molding material, as found and broken out of a bucket by workers every morning. Further, the stone piece that reminds one of the stone age, is indeed made of 400 million old rocks, and the soft seats are lent from construction, where these strokes of textile carry up the heaviest goods. In the corner — but as you walk this walk please be seated on any of the thrones and experience the work for a moment— the green fluffy cover is made by XXXX who remakes cartographies of warzones, one of which is here mounted on a flexible fishing chair. On an experience level, the conversation chair enhances self-confidence, while putting you literally in a good spot with the person you’re conversing with. The lamp perfectly shows the playful Cadavre Exquis...
Category

2010s Belgian Post-Modern Lionel Jadot Furniture

Materials

Steel

Side Table 'Optic III' by Lionel Jadot, Belgium, 2021
By Lionel Jadot
Located in Antwerp, BE
Design Miami; Art design; Art Basel; Atelier Lionel Jadot; Stools; Everyday Gallery; Contemporary; Belgian design; Belgian Art; coffee table; Functional Sculpture; Artwork; Collectib...
Category

2010s Belgian Organic Modern Lionel Jadot Furniture

Materials

Metal

Functional Art 'Slv Table' by Lionel Jadot, Belgium, 2021
By Lionel Jadot
Located in Antwerp, BE
Design Miami; Art Design; Art Basel; Atelier Lionel Jadot; Everyday Gallery; Contemporary; Belgian Design; Belgian Art; Table Lamp; Functional Sculpture; Artwork; Collectible Design;...
Category

2010s Belgian Organic Modern Lionel Jadot Furniture

Materials

Aluminum

'Sit in My Valley II' Sofa by Lionel Jadot, 2020
By Lionel Jadot
Located in Antwerp, BE
Sit in My Valley II Sofa by by Belgian artist Lionel Jadot, renowned for his unique assemblage of various historical elements into captivating and uni...
Category

2010s Belgian Post-Modern Lionel Jadot Furniture

Materials

Wool, Oak

Collectible Shelve Sculpture by Lionel Jadot, Belgian Art and Design
By Lionel Jadot
Located in Antwerp, BE
Design Miami; Art design; Art Basel; Atelier Lionel Jadot; Stools; Everyday Gallery; Contemporary; Belgian design; Belgian Art; Gesmonite; Shelves; Functional Sculpture; Artwork; Col...
Category

2010s Belgian Organic Modern Lionel Jadot Furniture

Materials

Aluminum

Functional Art Chair / Throne "'Spring Swab" by Lionel Jadot
By Lionel Jadot
Located in Antwerp, BE
Collectible design / Functional art, Lionel Jadot for Everyday Gallery, Belgium 2020 Born in Brussels in 1969, Lionel Jadot is an interior designer, artist, designer, filmmaker, adventurer. But all at once, preferably. Lionel Jadot is firing on all cylinders. ‘I never throw anything, I pick up everything. Not having a green thumb, I’m trying cuttings, weddings against nature. I never forget a line.’ He’s inviting us in subtle, off-beat worlds, on the edge of reality. Its material is made of dilated time. A wandering spirit, he seeks a protective balance in a hostile world. It is his constant questioning: what happens to the place where we live? For Lionel Jadot, everything is object, everything is history. He draws from other places, other times, and seeks what’s linking them. He sews, stitches, unpicks, blends materials, combines eras. He will enshrine some wood essence in metal, some mineral in a plant, the old in the new. ‘I take extra care to the joint between two materials.’ With him, there is always some play in the parts, as in a piece of machinery. From a kingdom to another, he provokes organic, viral growths, generating energy. Linking past and future, he never forgets a line. ‘I accumulate them.’ He’s inviting us in subtle worlds, off-beat, on the edge of reality. Are we in 1930 or in 2030? Both, no doubt. Its material is made of dilated time. The eye goes hand in hand with the ear. ‘When I walk into a place, I listen to the good (or bad) it does to me. An ineffable feeling.’ He recreates mutant buildings, like the future Royal Botanique, a 5 stars hotel housed in the Church of the Gesu, a former convent behind a 1940 façade. He talks about a ‘hotel object’, which he holds and turns around in his hand. A wandering spirit, he’s flirting with retro-futurism. The Jam, another hotel, is intended for urban travelers, fans of swiftness, fluidity and hospitality. He designs interiors as a set of objects: a motorcycle cut in concrete becomes a bar counter. He finds gothic cartoon echoes, from the likes of Moebius, Alejandro Jodorowsky, Enki Bilal, sets from Garage Hermétique and Blade Runner, a protective balance in a hostile world. Discovering Jadot’s little cosmos of collected and accumulated goods, it becomes clear that every element has its own story. I tried to collect them and in turn, devour them in the coming paragraphs. But first: the show is best experienced seated, barring the distinction between object of use and object of attention, they invite for different types of conversation. The seats, chairs, thrones all make us think of our own physical comportment, and of how the seat lends grandeur to the person sitting on it, by crowning its presence. The crackling floor, the felt walls and the diffuse light slow you down into an oddly absorbing environment, in which you are left puzzled. In the eclectic collages of objects, bits and pieces collected all over the world come together in ways practical, and logical, though possibly only in the artist’s mind. All his finds eventually seem to fall into place. Starting with the mere conception of a chair, rather than with a set-out plan or sketch, the works are intuitively construed out of an archive that one can only imagine the dimensions of. Things forgotten by others, precious for him, were all once designed for their own purpose. Here they find their fit as a base, a closing system or a balancing element. The first piece that opens the exhibition, the most throne-like of all seats in the show, builds around a chair of his grandmother, protected by mops, and harassed with bed springs. As you enter the space, you pass by a shell leaning over a yellow seat that stems from his old Mustang, and find a white stool piece with Mexican leather dog training whips— the white building blocks of which turn out to be dried molding material, as found and broken out of a bucket by workers every morning. Further, the stone piece that reminds one of the stone age, is indeed made of 400 million old rocks, and the soft seats are lent from construction, where these strokes of textile carry up the heaviest goods. In the corner — but as you walk this walk please be seated on any of the thrones and experience the work for a moment— the green fluffy cover is made by XXXX who remakes cartographies of warzones, one of which is here mounted on a flexible fishing chair. On an experience level, the conversation chair enhances self-confidence, while putting you literally in a good spot with the person you’re conversing with. The lamp perfectly shows the playful Cadavre Exquis...
Category

2010s Belgian International Style Lionel Jadot Furniture

Materials

Metal

Contemporary Coffee Table Lionel Jadot 'Big Bear Grinder' Belgian Art and Design
By Lionel Jadot
Located in Antwerp, BE
Design Miami; Art design; Art Basel; Atelier Lionel Jadot; Stools; Everyday Gallery; Contemporary; Belgian design; Belgian Art; coffee table; functional sculpture; Artwork; collectib...
Category

2010s Belgian Organic Modern Lionel Jadot Furniture

Materials

Granite

Contemporary Side Table by Lionel Jadot 'Little Bear Grinder' Belgian Design
By Lionel Jadot
Located in Antwerp, BE
Design Miami; Art design; Art Basel; Atelier Lionel Jadot; Stools; Everyday Gallery; Contemporary; Belgian design; Belgian Art; Side Table; Functional Sculpture; Artwork; Collectible Design; Everyday Gallery; Design Culture; Contextual Design; Functional art; coffee table; Artwork / Collectible design / Functional sculpture side table named 'Little Bear...
Category

2010s Belgian Organic Modern Lionel Jadot Furniture

Materials

Marble

Lionel Jadot Stools Everyday Gallery, Belgian Art and design, Contemporary
By Lionel Jadot
Located in Antwerp, BE
Lionel Jadot; Stools; Everyday Gallery; Contemporary; Belgian design; Belgian Art; Gesmonite; Presented at Art Basel 2021, Everyday Gallery is thr...
Category

21st Century and Contemporary Belgian Modern Lionel Jadot Furniture

Materials

Plastic

Contemporary Floor Lamp by Lionel Jadot 'Gilga' Belgian Art and Design Basel
By Lionel Jadot
Located in Antwerp, BE
Design Miami; Art design; Art Basel; Atelier Lionel Jadot; Stools; Everyday Gallery; Contemporary; Belgian design; Belgian Art; floor lamp; Functional Sculpture; Artwork; Collectible...
Category

2010s Belgian Organic Modern Lionel Jadot Furniture

Materials

Metal

Contemporary Table Lamp by Lionel Jadot 'Plaster Trash B' Belgian Art and Design
By Lionel Jadot
Located in Antwerp, BE
Design Miami; Art design; Art Basel; Atelier Lionel Jadot; Everyday Gallery; Contemporary; Belgian design; Belgian Art; Table Lamp; Functional Sculpture; Artwork; Collectible Design;...
Category

2010s Belgian Organic Modern Lionel Jadot Furniture

Materials

Plaster, Wood

Contemporary Floor Lamp by Lionel Jadot 'Marble Tree' Belgian Art and Design
By Lionel Jadot
Located in Antwerp, BE
Design Miami; art design; Art Basel; Atelier Lionel Jadot; stools; Everyday Gallery; Contemporary; Belgian design; Belgian art; Lamp; Functional Sculpture; Artwork; Collectible Design; Everyday Gallery; Design Culture; Contextual Design; Functional art; Floor Lamp; Table Lamp; Artwork / collectible design / functional art/ floor lamp named 'Marble Tree...
Category

2010s Belgian Organic Modern Lionel Jadot Furniture

Materials

Stone

Contemporary Table Lamp by Lionel Jadot 'Plaster Trash A' Belgian Art and Design
By Lionel Jadot
Located in Antwerp, BE
Design Miami; Art design; Art Basel; Atelier Lionel Jadot; Everyday Gallery; Contemporary; Belgian design; Belgian Art; Table Lamp; Functional Sculpture; Artwork; Collectible Design;...
Category

2010s Belgian Organic Modern Lionel Jadot Furniture

Materials

Plaster, Wood

Contemporary Sculpture by Lionel Jadot 'Plexi Tree' Belgian Art and Design Basel
By Lionel Jadot
Located in Antwerp, BE
Design Miami; Art design; Art Basel; Atelier Lionel Jadot; Everyday Gallery; Contemporary; Belgian design; Belgian Art; Sculpture; Functional Sculpture; Artwork; Collectible Design; ...
Category

2010s Belgian Organic Modern Lionel Jadot Furniture

Materials

Aluminum

'The King of Tiébélé' Assemblage Chair, with Backrest from Tiébélé, Lionel Jadot
By Lionel Jadot
Located in Antwerp, BE
'The King of Tiébélé' chair is a functional art piece and collectable design that features a frame attributed to Philippe Hiquily, a seat from a Pontiac 72, pocket spring seat from Lionel Jadot's grandfather’s workshop, a backrest made from a traditionally patterned woven motorcycle cover from Tiébélé in Burkina-Faso, and a headrest in the style of mountain decor...
Category

2010s Belgian Post-Modern Lionel Jadot Furniture

Materials

Other

Functional art Throne / Chair "Black Caterpillar" by Lionel Jadot, 2020
By Lionel Jadot
Located in Antwerp, BE
Collectible Design / Functional art, Lionel Jadot for Everyday Gallery, Belgium 2020 The chair made with scrap metal laser cuts and a prototype element of one of Lionel’s coffee table, the legs are made with the pantograph of a drawing table from the 30s, hung on an inked piece of Japanese wood from the 19th piece of furniture. Born in Brussels in 1969, Lionel Jadot is an interior designer, artist, designer, filmmaker, adventurer. But all at once, preferably. Lionel Jadot is firing on all cylinders. ‘I never throw anything, I pick up everything. Not having a green thumb, I’m trying cuttings, weddings against nature. I never forget a line.’ He’s inviting us in subtle, off-beat worlds, on the edge of reality. Its material is made of dilated time. A wandering spirit, he seeks a protective balance in a hostile world. It is his constant questioning: what happens to the place where we live? For Lionel Jadot, everything is object, everything is history. He draws from other places, other times, and seeks what’s linking them. He sews, stitches, unpicks, blends materials, combines eras. He will enshrine some wood essence in metal, some mineral in a plant, the old in the new. ‘I take extra care to the joint between two materials.’ With him, there is always some play in the parts, as in a piece of machinery. From a kingdom to another, he provokes organic, viral growths, generating energy. Linking past and future, he never forgets a line. ‘I accumulate them.’ He’s inviting us in subtle worlds, off-beat, on the edge of reality. Are we in 1930 or in 2030? Both, no doubt. Its material is made of dilated time. The eye goes hand in hand with the ear. ‘When I walk into a place, I listen to the good (or bad) it does to me. An ineffable feeling.’ He recreates mutant buildings, like the future Royal Botanique, a 5 stars hotel housed in the Church of the Gesu, a former convent behind a 1940 façade. He talks about a ‘hotel object’, which he holds and turns around in his hand. A wandering spirit, he’s flirting with retro-futurism. The Jam, another hotel, is intended for urban travelers, fans of swiftness, fluidity and hospitality. He designs interiors as a set of objects: a motorcycle cut in concrete becomes a bar counter. He finds gothic cartoon echoes, from the likes of Moebius, Alejandro Jodorowsky, Enki Bilal, sets from Garage Hermétique and Blade Runner, a protective balance in a hostile world. Discovering Jadot’s little cosmos of collected and accumulated goods, it becomes clear that every element has its own story. I tried to collect them and in turn, devour them in the coming paragraphs. But first: the show is best experienced seated, barring the distinction between object of use and object of attention, they invite for different types of conversation. The seats, chairs, thrones all make us think of our own physical comportment, and of how the seat lends grandeur to the person sitting on it, by crowning its presence. The crackling floor, the felt walls and the diffuse light slow you down into an oddly absorbing environment, in which you are left puzzled. In the eclectic collages of objects, bits and pieces collected all over the world come together in ways practical, and logical, though possibly only in the artist’s mind. All his finds eventually seem to fall into place. Starting with the mere conception of a chair, rather than with a set-out plan or sketch, the works are intuitively construed out of an archive that one can only imagine the dimensions of. Things forgotten by others, precious for him, were all once designed for their own purpose. Here they find their fit as a base, a closing system or a balancing element. The first piece that opens the exhibition, the most throne-like of all seats in the show, builds around a chair of his grandmother, protected by mops, and harassed with bed springs. As you enter the space, you pass by a shell leaning over a yellow seat that stems from his old Mustang, and find a white stool piece with Mexican leather dog training whips— the white building blocks of which turn out to be dried molding material, as found and broken out of a bucket by workers every morning. Further, the stone piece that reminds one of the stone age, is indeed made of 400 million old rocks, and the soft seats are lent from construction, where these strokes of textile carry up the heaviest goods. In the corner — but as you walk this walk please be seated on any of the thrones and experience the work for a moment— the green fluffy cover is made by XXXX who remakes cartographies of warzones, one of which is here mounted on a flexible fishing chair...
Category

2010s European Lionel Jadot Furniture

Materials

Brass, Steel

Functional Art Chair / Stool "Plaster Whip" by Lionel Jadot
By Lionel Jadot
Located in Antwerp, BE
"Plaster Whip" sculpture by Lionel Jadot A stool made of leftover plaster vats from a molding company, scrap metal, leather whips from the 1950s and a bodybuilder’s belt from the 1930s Collectible Design / Functional art , Lionel Jadot for Everyday Gallery, Belgium 2020 Born in Brussels in 1969, Lionel Jadot is an interior designer, artist, designer, filmmaker, adventurer. But all at once, preferably. Lionel Jadot is firing on all cylinders. ‘I never throw anything, I pick up everything. Not having a green thumb, I’m trying cuttings, weddings against nature. I never forget a line.’ He’s inviting us in subtle, off-beat worlds, on the edge of reality. Its material is made of dilated time. A wandering spirit, he seeks a protective balance in a hostile world. It is his constant questioning: what happens to the place where we live? For Lionel Jadot, everything is object, everything is history. He draws from other places, other times, and seeks what’s linking them. He sews, stitches, unpicks, blends materials, combines eras. He will enshrine some wood essence in metal, some mineral in a plant, the old in the new. ‘I take extra care to the joint between two materials.’ With him, there is always some play in the parts, as in a piece of machinery. From a kingdom to another, he provokes organic, viral growths, generating energy. Linking past and future, he never forgets a line. ‘I accumulate them.’ He’s inviting us in subtle worlds, off-beat, on the edge of reality. Are we in 1930 or in 2030? Both, no doubt. Its material is made of dilated time. The eye goes hand in hand with the ear. ‘When I walk into a place, I listen to the good (or bad) it does to me. An ineffable feeling.’ He recreates mutant buildings, like the future Royal Botanique, a 5 stars hotel housed in the Church of the Gesu, a former convent behind a 1940 façade. He talks about a ‘hotel object’, which he holds and turns around in his hand. A wandering spirit, he’s flirting with retro-futurism. The Jam, another hotel, is intended for urban travelers, fans of swiftness, fluidity and hospitality. He designs interiors as a set of objects: a motorcycle cut in concrete becomes a bar counter. He finds gothic cartoon echoes, from the likes of Moebius, Alejandro Jodorowsky, Enki Bilal, sets from Garage Hermétique and Blade Runner, a protective balance in a hostile world. Discovering Jadot’s little cosmos of collected and accumulated goods, it becomes clear that every element has its own story. I tried to collect them and in turn, devour them in the coming paragraphs. But first: the show is best experienced seated, barring the distinction between object of use and object of attention, they invite for different types of conversation. The seats, chairs, thrones all make us think of our own physical comportment, and of how the seat lends grandeur to the person sitting on it, by crowning its presence. The crackling floor, the felt walls and the diffuse light slow you down into an oddly absorbing environment, in which you are left puzzled. In the eclectic collages of objects, bits and pieces collected all over the world come together in ways practical, and logical, though possibly only in the artist’s mind. All his finds eventually seem to fall into place. Starting with the mere conception of a chair, rather than with a set-out plan or sketch, the works are intuitively construed out of an archive that one can only imagine the dimensions of. Things forgotten by others, precious for him, were all once designed for their own purpose. Here they find their fit as a base, a closing system or a balancing element. The first piece that opens the exhibition, the most throne-like of all seats in the show, builds around a chair of his grandmother, protected by mops, and harassed with bed springs. As you enter the space, you pass by a shell leaning over a yellow seat that stems from his old Mustang, and find a white stool piece with Mexican leather dog training whips— the white building blocks of which turn out to be dried molding material, as found and broken out of a bucket by workers every morning. Further, the stone piece that reminds one of the stone age, is indeed made of 400 million old rocks, and the soft seats are lent from construction, where these strokes of textile carry up the heaviest goods. In the corner — but as you walk this walk please be seated on any of the thrones and experience the work for a moment— the green fluffy cover is made by XXXX who remakes cartographies of warzones, one of which is here mounted on a flexible fishing chair. On an experience level, the conversation chair enhances self-confidence, while putting you literally in a good spot with the person you’re conversing with. The lamp perfectly shows the playful Cadavre Exquis...
Category

2010s European Lionel Jadot Furniture

Materials

Leather, Plaster

Billie Jean Sofa by Lionel Jadot, 2020
By Lionel Jadot
Located in Antwerp, BE
Billie Jean seat by Belgian artist Lionel Jadot, renowned for his unique assemblage of various historical elements into captivating and unique designs. This seat is made with 1960s...
Category

2010s Belgian Post-Modern Lionel Jadot Furniture

Materials

Copper

Functional art Floor Lamp "Open Eyes" by Lionel Jadot
By Lionel Jadot
Located in Antwerp, BE
Open eyes floor lamp by Lionel Jadot. Functional art; Lionel Jadot; Belgian art Born in Brussels in 1969, Lionel Jadot is an interior designer, artist, designer, filmmaker, adventurer. But all at once, preferably. Lionel Jadot is firing on all cylinders. ‘I never throw anything, I pick up everything. Not having a green thumb, I’m trying cuttings, weddings against nature. I never forget a line.’ He’s inviting us in subtle, off-beat worlds, on the edge of reality. Its material is made of dilated time. A wandering spirit, he seeks a protective balance in a hostile world. It is his constant questioning: what happens to the place where we live? For Lionel Jadot, everything is object, everything is history. He draws from other places, other times, and seeks what’s linking them. He sews, stitches, unpicks, blends materials, combines eras. He will enshrine some wood essence in metal, some mineral in a plant, the old in the new. ‘I take extra care to the joint between two materials.’ With him, there is always some play in the parts, as in a piece of machinery. From a kingdom to another, he provokes organic, viral growths, generating energy. Linking past and future, he never forgets a line. ‘I accumulate them.’ He’s inviting us in subtle worlds, off-beat, on the edge of reality. Are we in 1930 or in 2030? Both, no doubt. Its material is made of dilated time. The eye goes hand in hand with the ear. ‘When I walk into a place, I listen to the good (or bad) it does to me. An ineffable feeling.’ He recreates mutant buildings, like the future Royal Botanique, a 5 stars hotel housed in the Church of the Gesu, a former convent behind a 1940 façade. He talks about a ‘hotel object’, which he holds and turns around in his hand. A wandering spirit, he’s flirting with retro-futurism. The Jam, another hotel, is intended for urban travelers, fans of swiftness, fluidity and hospitality. He designs interiors as a set of objects: a motorcycle cut in concrete becomes a bar counter. He finds gothic cartoon echoes, from the likes of Moebius, Alejandro Jodorowsky, Enki Bilal, sets from Garage Hermétique and Blade Runner, a protective balance in a hostile world. Discovering Jadot’s little cosmos of collected and accumulated goods, it becomes clear that every element has its own story. I tried to collect them and in turn, devour them in the coming paragraphs. But first: the show is best experienced seated, barring the distinction between object of use and object of attention, they invite for different types of conversation. The seats, chairs, thrones all make us think of our own physical comportment, and of how the seat lends grandeur to the person sitting on it, by crowning its presence. The crackling floor, the felt walls and the diffuse light slow you down into an oddly absorbing environment, in which you are left puzzled. In the eclectic collages of objects, bits and pieces collected all over the world come together in ways practical, and logical, though possibly only in the artist’s mind. All his finds eventually seem to fall into place. Starting with the mere conception of a chair, rather than with a set-out plan or sketch, the works are intuitively construed out of an archive that one can only imagine the dimensions of. Things forgotten by others, precious for him, were all once designed for their own purpose. Here they find their fit as a base, a closing system or a balancing element. The first piece that opens the exhibition, the most throne-like of all seats in the show, builds around a chair of his grandmother, protected by mops, and harassed with bed springs. As you enter the space, you pass by a shell leaning over a yellow seat that stems from his old Mustang, and find a white stool piece with Mexican leather dog training whips, the white building blocks of which turn out to be dried molding material, as found and broken out of a bucket by workers every morning. Further, the stone piece that reminds one of the stone age, is indeed made of 400 million old rocks, and the soft seats are lent from construction, where these strokes of textile carry up the heaviest goods. In the corner, but as you walk this walk please be seated on any of the thrones and experience the work for a moment, the green fluffy cover is made by XXXX who remakes cartographies of warzones, one of which is here mounted on a flexible fishing chair. On an experience level, the conversation chair enhances self-confidence, while putting you literally in a good spot with the person you’re conversing with. The lamp perfectly shows the playful Cadavre Exquis...
Category

2010s Belgian Post-Modern Lionel Jadot Furniture

Materials

Brass

'Frozen Culture' Assemblage Video Cassette Lounge Chair, Lionel Jadot, 2020
By Lionel Jadot
Located in Antwerp, BE
The ‘Frozen Culture’ chair is a unique functional art piece with a history. Constructed from a set of 35,000 VHS cassettes that were recorded over the course of 25 years by an indivi...
Category

2010s Belgian Post-Modern Lionel Jadot Furniture

Materials

Other

'I Studebaker' Assemblage Bench with Wooden and Leather Elements, Lionel Jadot
By Lionel Jadot
Located in Antwerp, BE
Assemblage functional art bench or sofa made from sections of a wooden ceiling installed in a bank by Christophe Gevers in the 1970s, burn-treated by Lionel Jadot, leather shapes are...
Category

2010s Belgian Post-Modern Lionel Jadot Furniture

Materials

Wood, Leather

'T-Shink' Sprayed Textile Throne Chair, Lionel Jadot, Belgium, 2020
By Lionel Jadot
Located in Antwerp, BE
The 'T-Shink' functional art throne chair is constructed of elements from wooden moulds which date back to the 1950s and originally used to make stainless steel sinks...
Category

2010s Belgian Post-Modern Lionel Jadot Furniture

Materials

Other

‘Let Me Talk’ Assemblage Chandelier, Lionel Jadot, Belgium, 2020
By Lionel Jadot
Located in Antwerp, BE
The ‘Let Me Talk’ chandelier is a functional art and collectable design piece constructed from assembled rattan seats, slips of veneer in tulip tree and oak wood. The light fixtures ...
Category

2010s Belgian Post-Modern Lionel Jadot Furniture

Materials

Other

Lionel Jadot and Zaventem Ateliers, Spin Love, BE
By Lionel Jadot
Located in New York, NY
Bringing together 15 of Europe’s most exceptional artisans working across the design spectrum, Jadot has spearheaded the creation of an extraordinary mixed-media, multi-functional object in the form of an unique ping pong table, titled “Spin Love.” In addition to its recreational use, "Spin Love" can be divided with each table top elevated to serve as a double-sided room divider or screen, with a matching pair of standing floor lamps. One of the most ambitious works of decorative arts today, “Spin Love” connects the talents of the idiosyncratic, visionary artists that make up Zaventem Ateliers. Jadot is the mastermind behind Zaventem, an experimental artist workspace accommodating 32 separate workshops dedicated to the production and transformation of materials, allowing a group of exceptional craftsmen working in ceramics, leather, metal, marble, textiles, and wood to collaborate, experiment, and inspire one another. As a physical representation of the ingenuity and creative drive housed within the walls of Zaventem Ateliers, “Spin Love” asserts their commitment to old world craftsmanship, free thinking, and modern innovation. In conceiving “Spin Love” Jadot aimed to create a work where visionary design and idiosyncratic craftsmanship meets the already collaborative energy, humor and playfulness he had amassed within Zaventem. Each individual element, from the mixed media table tops to the unique ping pong paddles, showcases the height of the artists’ specific expertise. The double sided clover-shaped table top can be divided into two separate tables, each with the ability to be raised to stand upright, acting as a dual-faced screen allowing for four distinct visual options.One bifurcated table half features black and white geometrically patterned leather collages from Niyona, a French custom leather design company. Its corresponding half is composed of precious wood marquetry work by Alexandre Lowie with a steel star detail jewelry designer by Luna Lotta. The second table is composed of an integration of metalwork by Maison Jonckers and textiles from Studio Krjst enclosed within poured resin. On one side each artist’s work is tessellated into a tightly controlled pattern. Flipping the table over reveals an expressive and chaotic assemblage of patterns and textures. The freestanding, movable lamps...
Category

2010s Belgian Modern Lionel Jadot Furniture

Materials

Marble, Metal

Lionel Jadot, Show Clothes, BE
By Lionel Jadot
Located in New York, NY
Lionel Jadot’s mixed media and glass wardrobe, titled Show Clothe was conceived for a dressing room, the interior becoming an installation for its inner...
Category

2010s Belgian Lionel Jadot Furniture

Materials

Brass, Copper, Stainless Steel

Lionel Jadot, Crushed Seat, BE
By Lionel Jadot
Located in New York, NY
Crushed seat, Jadot’s juxtaposed material assemblage, is a colossal manifestation of his unusual creative process. Constructed of reclaimed MDF that has been painted in vibrant color...
Category

2010s Belgian Lionel Jadot Furniture

Materials

Foam, Reclaimed Wood, Paint

Lionel Jadot, Fractal Dragon, BE
By Lionel Jadot
Located in New York, NY
Fractal Dragon, Jadot’s expansive graphic cabinet, reawakens an early 20th century Japanese ink drawing depicting a floating dragon. In traditional Jap...
Category

2010s Belgian Lionel Jadot Furniture

Materials

Walnut

Lionel Jadot, Leather Time, BE
By Lionel Jadot
Located in New York, NY
The idea for Leather Time was a challenge to form a table in a single sheet of brass. The bright pink color was inspired by Malabar chewing gum giving its slight Industrial feel a se...
Category

2010s Belgian Lionel Jadot Furniture

Materials

Leather

Lionel Jadot, Prisma Flight Table, BE
By Lionel Jadot
Located in New York, NY
While not easily categorized by a singular style, Jadot’s work could most easily be recognized by his affinity for repurposed materials and his deft eye at creating harmony and balan...
Category

2010s Belgian Lionel Jadot Furniture

Materials

Brass

Luncheon on the Grass, BE
By Lionel Jadot
Located in New York, NY
Created from disparate elements, Industrial netting, crane straps, military tents, and a eighteenth century textile, Jadot’s tremendous tapestry, Luncheon on the Grass...
Category

2010s Belgian Lionel Jadot Furniture

Materials

Patent Leather, Tapestry

Rolling Throne, BE
By Lionel Jadot
Located in New York, NY
Jadot describes his magnificent assemblage chair, embellished with 24-carat gold and hardware elements, as “an enlightened assembly made with disparate elements, a game of collisions...
Category

2010s Belgian Lionel Jadot Furniture

Materials

Gold

Blue Tie Roofing, BE
By Lionel Jadot
Located in New York, NY
Created from a solid rosewood, 18th century Dutch cabinet, black tie roofing is Jadot’s reflection on the evolution of our civilization, and...
Category

2010s Belgian Lionel Jadot Furniture

Materials

Gold Leaf

Babel Crane, BE
By Lionel Jadot
Located in New York, NY
The mixed-media chandelier, Babel Crane, exemplifies Jadot’s ability to elevate common objects by ignoring their original intent and juxtaposing them with high end materials, from ra...
Category

2010s American Lionel Jadot Furniture

Materials

Brass, Steel

Lionel Jadot furniture for sale on 1stDibs.

Lionel Jadot furniture are available for sale on 1stDibs. These distinctive items are frequently made of metal and are designed with extraordinary care. There are many options to choose from in our collection of Lionel Jadot furniture, although brown editions of this piece are particularly popular. Many of the original furniture by Lionel Jadot were created in the modern style in europe during the 21st century and contemporary. If you’re looking for additional options, many customers also consider furniture by and Kaspar Hamacher. Prices for Lionel Jadot furniture can differ depending upon size, time period and other attributes — on 1stDibs, these items begin at $2,880 and can go as high as $71,322, while a piece like these, on average, fetch $11,588.

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