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Bow Porcelain Figure of Boy or Putto on C-Scroll Base, Georgian circa 1760

$825

About

This is a wonderful little porcelain figure of a boy or putto made by the Bow Porcelain factory in circa 1760, which was the Georgian era. The boy is placed on a C-Scroll base with a small bocage. The Bow Porcelain Factory was one of the first potteries in Britain to make soft paste porcelain, and most probably the very first to use bone ash, which later got perfected by Josiah Spode to what is now the universally used "bone china". Bow was the main competitor of the Chelsea Porcelain Factory, but where Chelsea made very fine slipcast porcelain, Bow made a different soft paste porcelain that tended to be softer and could be pressed into moulds. Bow served a larger public generally at lower prices. The factory was only in operation between 1743 and 1774, after which the tradition got incorporated into some of the later famous potteries such as Worcester and Derby. This boy figure (which is often called a putto or cherub) was first modelled in the 1750s, which was at the height of Bow's ability to make beautiful figurines often copied from Chelsea or Meissen. This particular one is from a little later (1760), when Bow started putting their figures on top of a Rococo C-scroll base. The porcelain is relatively translucent with a thick milky greyish glaze. The decoration may have been done outside the factory, as many Bow decorations probably were. It is typically bright in color, unlike Chelsea, which tended to use more subtle colors. This boy originally had a bocage, or flower tree, behind him, but like with many of these figures this was broken off, as can be seen from the surface at the back of the head and the square hole in the back of the base. The boy is seated on a beautiful Rococo C-scroll that is typical for the Bow figures of 1760 onwards. The way we know this is a boy is the placement of the ribbon over his left shoulder; with girl figures, Bow placed the ribbons on the right shoulder. These figures were used to adorn the dinner table when dessert was served; groups of figures served to express something about the host, the guests, or to direct the conversation. This figure would make a fabulous gift to a loved one or antiques lover, and with its high artistic value it is a wonderful little piece of decoration for any interior design style. The item is unmarked, which is common for Bow items. Condition report the figure is in excellent condition and looks wonderful and, except the flaked surface on the back of its head, without significant losses. A few flower petals are missing, which is clearly visible in the pictures. The Rococo scroll looks perfect. Like many Bow figures of this period, the surface looks a little grimy in places, which is either something that happened in the kiln by over-firing, or penetration of the slightly porous glaze and enamel paint over time. This is a phenomenon that can often be seen in Bow figures. Antique British porcelain is never perfect. Kilns were fired on coal in the 1800s, and this meant that china from that period can have some firing specks from flying particles. British makers were also known for their experimentation, and sometimes this resulted in technically imperfect results. Due to the shrinkage in the kiln, items can have small firing lines or develop crazing over time, which should not be seen as damage but as an imperfection of the maker's recipes, probably unknown at the time of making. Items have often been used for many years and can have normal signs of wear, and gilt can have signs of slight disintegration even if never handled. I will reflect any damage, repairs, obvious stress marks, crazing or heavy wear in the item description but some minor scratches, nicks, stains and gilt disintegration can be normal for vintage items and need to be taken into account. There is widespread confusion on the internet about the difference between chips and nicks, or hairlines and cracks. I will reflect any damage as truthfully as I can, i.e. a nick is a tiny bit of damage smaller than 1mm and a chip is something you can easily see with the eye; a glazing line is a break in the glazing only; hairline is extremely tight and/or superficial and not picked up by the finger; and a crack is obvious both to the eye and the finger. Dimensions: height 12cm (4 3/4").

Details

  • Creator
  • Dimensions
    Height: 4.75 in. (12.07 cm)Width: 2.5 in. (6.35 cm)Depth: 2.5 in. (6.35 cm)
  • Style
    Rococo (Of the Period)
  • Materials and Techniques
  • Place of Origin
  • Period
    1760-1769
  • Date of Manufacture
    circa 1760
  • Condition
    Wear consistent with age and use. Minor losses. Some minor losses to flower petals, some grime on the surface either from over-firing during production or from glaze penetration over time.
  • Seller Location
    London, GB
  • Reference Number
    Seller: A-BOW021stDibs: LU4805115285911

Shipping & Returns

  • Shipping
    Free Standard Shipping
    to anywhere in the world, arrives in 5-12 days.
    We recommend this shipping type based on item size, type and fragility.
    Ships From: London, United Kingdom
  • Return Policy

    A return for this item may be initiated within 14 days of delivery.

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About the Seller
5 / 5
Located in London, United Kingdom
Platinum Seller
This distinction is for experienced sellers who continually surpass customer expectations.
Established in 2017
1stDibs seller since 2019
42 sales on 1stDibs
Typical response time: 2 hours
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