Skip to main content

Table Top Mobiles

Price
Shipping Options
Sort By
James Bearden Abstract Table Top Sculpture
By James Bearden
Located in Kansas City, MO
Tabletop sculpture of torch cut steel and applied patina by artist James Bearden. This complex work features a Kinetic or mobile element on the top portion.
Category

21st Century and Contemporary American Modern Mobiles and Kinetic Sculpt...

Materials

Wire, Cut Steel

  • James Bearden Abstract Table Top Sculpture
  • James Bearden Abstract Table Top Sculpture
  • James Bearden Abstract Table Top Sculpture
  • James Bearden Abstract Table Top Sculpture
H 29.5 in. W 13.5 in. D 15.5 in.
Large Vintage Table-Top Mobile
By Alexander Calder
Located in Oaks, PA
Large Vintage Table-Top Mobile-In the style of Alexander Calder, the kinetic mobile can rotate, constructed of metal resting on a wood rod inset in a square 4 inch x 4 inch steel cub...
Category

Vintage 1960s American Mid-Century Modern Mobiles and Kinetic Sculptures

Materials

Metal, Steel

Collection of Jim Hunter Table Top Mobiles, circa 2014-2016
By Jim Hunter
Located in New York, NY
Contemporary New York artist/sculptor Jim Hunter's modern collection of five tabletop mobiles are Kinetic sculptures. Different sizes, colors, shapes and custom work available, pleas...
Category

21st Century and Contemporary American Mid-Century Modern Mobiles and Ki...

Materials

Metal, Sheet Metal, Wire

Collection of Jim Hunter Table Top Mobiles, circa 2014-2016
By Jim Hunter
Located in New York, NY
Contemporary New York artist/sculptor Jim Hunter's modern collection of five tabletop mobiles are Kinetic sculptures. All works are accompanied with a Certificate of Authenticity fro...
Category

21st Century and Contemporary American Mid-Century Modern Mobiles and Ki...

Materials

Sheet Metal, Wire, Metal

Joseph Burlini Kinetic Table Top Sculpture, circa 1970s
By Joseph A. Burlini
Located in Kansas City, MO
Joseph Burlini kinetic sculpture in chromed steel. Movement is excellent. Condition is very good to excellent. A fine example of Burlini's work.
Category

Vintage 1970s American Mid-Century Modern Mobiles and Kinetic Sculptures

Materials

Chrome

A Close Look at mid-century-modern Furniture

Organically shaped, clean-lined and elegantly simple are three terms that well describe mid-century modern American furniture. The style, which emerged primarily in the years following World War II, is characterized by pieces that were conceived and made in an energetic, optimistic spirit by creators who believed that good design was an essential part of good living.

Postwar American architects and designers were animated by new ideas and new technology. The lean, functionalist “International Style” architecture of Le Corbusier and Bauhaus eminences such as Ludwig Mies van der Rohe and Walter Gropius had been promoted in the United States during the ’30s by Philip Johnson and others. New building techniques, such as “post-and-beam” construction, allowed the International-style schemes to be realized on a small scale, in open-plan houses with long walls of glass.

Materials developed for wartime use became available for domestic goods and were incorporated into mid-century modern furniture designs. Charles and Ray Eames and Eero Saarinen, who had experimented extensively with molded plywood, eagerly embraced fiberglass for, respectively, pieces such as the La Chaise and the Womb chair. George Nelson and his design team created Bubble lamp shades using a new translucent polymer skin. Harry Bertoia and Isamu Noguchi devised chairs and tables built of wire mesh and wire struts. Materials were re-purposed: the Danish-born designer Jens Risom created a line of chairs that used surplus parachute straps for webbed seats and backrests.

As the demand for casual, uncluttered furnishings grew, more mid-century designers caught the spirit.

Classically-oriented creators such as Edward Wormley, house designer for Dunbar Inc., offered such pieces as the sinuous Listen to Me chaise; the British expatriate T.H. Robsjohn-Gibbings switched gears, creating items such as the tiered, biomorphic Mesa table. There were Young Turks such as Paul McCobb — who designed holistic groups of sleek, blonde-wood furniture — and Milo Baughman, who espoused a West Coast aesthetic in lushly upholstered chairs and sofas with angular steel frames.

As the collection of vintage mid-century modern American furniture on 1stDibs demonstrates, this period saw one of the most delightful and dramatic flowerings of creativity in design history.

Finding the Right Sculptures for You

Styling your home with vintage, new and antique sculptures means adding a touch that can meaningfully transform the space. By introducing a sculptural work as a decorative finish to any interior, you’re making a statement, whether you tend toward the dramatic or prefer to keep things casual with modest, understated art.

A single, one-of-a-kind three-dimensional figurative sculpture mounted on your dining room wall is a guaranteed conversation piece, while a trio of abstract works arranged on your living room bookshelves can add spontaneity to the collection of first-edition novels or artist monographs you’re displaying as well as draw attention to them. Figurative sculptures are representational works that portray a specific person, animal or object. And while decorating with busts, which are sculpted or cast figurative works, hasn’t exactly topped the list of design trends every year, busts are back. According to designer Timothy Corrigan, “They give humanity in a way that a more abstract sculpture can’t give.” Abstract sculptures, on the other hand, are not meant to show something specific. Instead, they invoke a mood or scene without directly stating what they are portraying.

Busts made of stone or metal may not seem like a good fit for your existing decor. Fortunately, there are many ways for a seemingly incongruous piece to fit in with the rest of your room’s theme. You can embrace a dramatic piece by making it the focal point of the room, or you can choose to incorporate several elements made out of the same material to create harmony in your space. If an antique or more dramatic piece doesn’t feel like you, why not opt for works comprising plastic, fiberglass or other more modern materials?

When incorporating sculpture into the design of your home — be it the playful work of auction hero and multimedia visionary KAWS, contemporary fiber art from Connecticut dealer browngrotta arts or still-life sculpture on a budget — consider proper lighting, which can bring out the distinctive aspects of your piece that deserve attention. And make sure you know how the size and form of the sculpture will affect your space in whole. If you choose a sculpture with dramatic design elements, such as sharp angles or bright colors, for example, try to better integrate this new addition by echoing those elements in the rest of your room’s design.

Get started on decorating with sculpture now — find figurative sculptures, animal sculptures and more on 1stDibs today.