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Deborah Kass Art

American, b. 1952

Deborah Kass made her name in the late 1980s and early ’90s riffing on postwar greats from Jackson Pollock and Robert Rauschenberg to, most famously, Andy Warhol, giving their signature styles her own brand of feminist cheekiness.

The daughter of a dentist whose passion was playing jazz sax, Kass grew up in Rockville Centre, Long Island. When she was old enough, she would use her babysitting money to take the train to Manhattan and roam the Museum of Modern Art, where she noticed a dearth of female artists, but “it didn’t stop me from falling in love with Cézanne or Stella or Warhol,” she says.

After attending the Whitney Museum Independent Study Program and earning a BFA at Carnegie Mellon University in 1974, Kass hightailed it back to New York, where she concentrated on Expressionistic landscapes. “There was no shortage of women painters or women artists,” she recalls. “That’s what people were looking at. The zeitgeist was about feminism and women.” Yet when the Reagan Era hit, as Kass sees it, women were shunted aside.

Kass responded with mash-ups of male-dominated art history, references to other female artists and her own imagery. Then came the “Warhol Project.” In 1991 she made Before and Happily Ever After, which paired Warhol’s painting of a woman pre- and post-nose job with a close-up of the prince placing the glass slipper on Cinderella’s foot. There were her “Barbras” in profile — her Warholesque silk-screen series of Barbra Streisand — which she dubbed “The Jewish Jackie Series,” as well as more self-portrait parodies, including “The Deb Suite,” a takeoff of Warhol’s Elizabeth Taylor series.

Kass was deeply influenced by Warhol himself — a gay Catholic who sought acceptance in the culture — as well as Cornel West, Elaine Showalter and other theorists in black and feminist studies. “I thought Jewishness belonged in the discourse of multiculturalism,” she says. “Barbra was a celebration. I was tired of talking about my absence. I wanted to talk about my presence.” That her work, aimed at heralding women’s contributions, relies to a large extent on those of men does not bother her. She sees no need to downplay the men in order to give the women a shout-out. The men she references “deserve to be on pedestals. These are artists I love,” she says. The problem is not their inclusion in the canon but rather what she calls the “omissions.”

In 2002, Kass began “Feel Good Paintings For Feel Bad Times,” text-centric, graphically rendered canvases that play her emotions and politics off her love of popular culture, particularly Broadway. Works include Oh God I Need This Show (which references A Chorus Line), If I Were a Wealthy Man (Fiddler on the Roof), Nobody Puts Baby in a Corner (Dirty Dancing) and Sing Out Louise (Gypsy). Kass’s signature paintings, done primarily in the 1990s and often riffing on the imagery of Warhol, came together in “My Elvis+” at New York’s Paul Kasmin Gallery in 2013.

The Kasmin show came on the heels of Kass’s first museum retrospective, which was well received at the Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh in 2012. One critic wrote that she “pays affectionate homage . . . to an art-world society with which she maintains a close bond, even as she castigates it for sins and omissions.” Another compared her to Virginia Woolf.

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Deborah Kass Feminist Jewish American Pop Art Silkscreen Screenprint Ltd Edition
By Deborah Kass
Located in Surfside, FL
Deborah Kass (born 1952) Limited edition geometric abstract lithograph in colors on artist paper. Hand signed and dated in pencil to lower right. 1973. Edition: 102/120 to lower left. Dimensions: sight: 16-3/4" W x 21-1/4" H. Frame: 24-5/8" W x 28-7/8" H. Finding inspiration in pop culture, political realities, film, Yiddish, art historical styles, and prominent art world figures, Deborah Kass uses appropriation in her work to explore notions of identity, politics, and her own cultural interests. She received her BFA in painting at Carnegie Mellon University and studied at the Whitney Museum Independent Study Program and the Art Students League of New York. Deborah Kass (born 1952) is an American artist whose work explores the intersection of pop culture, art history, and the construction of self. Deborah Kass works in mixed media, and is most recognized for her paintings, prints, photography, sculptures and neon lighting installations. Kass's early work mimics and reworks signature styles of iconic male artists of the 20th century including Frank Stella, Andy Warhol, Jackson Pollock, and Ed Ruscha. Kass's technique of appropriation is a critical commentary on the intersection of social power relations, identity politics, and the historically dominant position of male artists in the art world. Deborah Kass was born in 1952 in San Antonio, Texas. Her grandparents were from Belarus and Ukraine, first generation Jewish immigrants to New York. Kass's parents were from the Bronx and Queens, New York. Her father did two years in the U.S. Air Force on base in San Antonio until the family returned to the suburbs of Long Island, New York, where Kass grew up. Kass’s mother was a substitute teacher at the Rockville Centre public schools and her father was a dentist and amateur jazz musician. At age 14, Kass began taking drawing classes at The Art Students League in New York City which she funded with money she made babysitting. In the afternoons, she would go to theater on and off Broadway, often sneaking for the second act. During her high school years, she would take her time in the city to visit the Museum of Modern Art, where she would be exposed to the works of post-war artists like Frank Stella and Willem De Kooning. At age 17, Stella’s retrospective exhibition inspired Kass to become an artist as she observed and understood the logic in his progression of works and the motivation behind his creative decisions. Kass received her BFA in Painting at Carnegie Mellon University (the alma mater of artist Andy Warhol), and studied at the Whitney Museum Independent Study Program Here, she created her first work of appropriation, Ophelia’s Death After Delacroix, a six by eight foot rendition of a small sketch by the French Romantic artist, Eugène Delacroix. At the same time Neo-Expressionism was being helmed by white men in the late Reagan years, women were just beginning to create a stake in the game for critical works. “The Photo Girls...
Category

2010s Pop Art Deborah Kass Art

Materials

Screen

Deborah Kass Feminist Jewish American Pop Art Silkscreen Screenprint Ltd Edition
By Deborah Kass
Located in Surfside, FL
Deborah Kass (born 1952) Being Alive, 2012 nine-color silkscreen, one color blend on 2-ply museum board Image 24 x 24 image. Frame 29 x 29 x 2 inches Edition 1/65 Hand signed and dated in pencil, lower right verso; numbered lower left verso Being Alive is from a vibrant and uplifting body of work entitled Feel Good Paintings for Feel Bad Times. Finding inspiration in pop culture, political realities, film, Yiddish, art historical styles, and prominent art world figures, Deborah Kass uses appropriation in her work to explore notions of identity, politics, and her own cultural interests. She received her BFA in painting at Carnegie Mellon University and studied at the Whitney Museum Independent Study Program and the Art Students League of New York. Deborah Kass (born 1952) is an American artist whose work explores the intersection of pop culture, art history, and the construction of self. Deborah Kass works in mixed media, and is most recognized for her paintings, prints, photography, sculptures and neon lighting installations. Kass's early work mimics and reworks signature styles of iconic male artists of the 20th century including Frank Stella, Andy Warhol, Jackson Pollock, and Ed Ruscha. Kass's technique of appropriation is a critical commentary on the intersection of social power relations, identity politics, and the historically dominant position of male artists in the art world. Deborah Kass was born in 1952 in San Antonio, Texas. Her grandparents were from Belarus and Ukraine, first generation Jewish immigrants to New York. Kass's parents were from the Bronx and Queens, New York. Her father did two years in the U.S. Air Force on base in San Antonio until the family returned to the suburbs of Long Island, New York, where Kass grew up. Kass’s mother was a substitute teacher at the Rockville Centre public schools and her father was a dentist and amateur jazz musician. At age 14, Kass began taking drawing classes at The Art Students League in New York City which she funded with money she made babysitting. In the afternoons, she would go to theater on and off Broadway, often sneaking for the second act. During her high school years, she would take her time in the city to visit the Museum of Modern Art, where she would be exposed to the works of post-war artists like Frank Stella and Willem De Kooning. At age 17, Stella’s retrospective exhibition inspired Kass to become an artist as she observed and understood the logic in his progression of works and the motivation behind his creative decisions. Kass received her BFA in Painting at Carnegie Mellon University (the alma mater of artist Andy Warhol), and studied at the Whitney Museum Independent Study Program Here, she created her first work of appropriation, Ophelia’s Death After Delacroix, a six by eight foot rendition of a small sketch by the French Romantic artist, Eugène Delacroix. At the same time Neo-Expressionism was being helmed by white men in the late Reagan years, women were just beginning to create a stake in the game for critical works. “The Photo Girls” consisted of artists like Sherrie Levine, Cindy Sherman, and Barbara Kruger. Kass felt that content of these works connected those of the post-war abstract painters of the mid-70s including Elizabeth Murray, Pat Steir, and Susan Rothenberg. All of these artists critically explored art in terms of new subjectivities from their points-of-view as women. Kass took from these artists the ideas of cultural and media critique, inspiring her Art History Paintings. Kass is most famous for her “Decade of Warhol,” in which she appropriated various works by the pop artist, Andy Warhol. She used Warhol’s visual language to comment on the absence of women in art history at the same time that Women’s Studies began to emerge in academia. Reading texts on subjectivity, objectivity, specificity, and gender fluidity by theorists like Judith Butler and Eve Sedgwick, Kass became literate in ideas surrounding identity. She engaged with art history through the lens of feminism, because of this theory which “The Photo Girls” drew upon. Kass's work is in the collections of the Museum of Modern Art; Whitney Museum of American Art; Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum; Jewish Museum (New York); Museum of Fine Art, Boston; Cincinnati Museum of Art; New Orleans Museum; National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; Fogg Museum, Harvard Art Museums; and Weatherspoon Museum, among others. In 2012 Kass's work was the subject of a mid-career retrospective Deborah Kass, Before and Happily Ever After at The Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh, PA. An accompanying catalogue published by Skira Rizzoli, included essays by noted art historians Griselda Pollock, Irving Sandler, Robert Storr, Eric C. Shiner and writers and filmmakers Lisa Liebmann, Brooks Adams, and John Waters. Kass's work has been shown at international private and public venues including at the Venice Biennale, the Istanbul Biennale, the Museum Ludwig, Cologne, the Museum of Modern Art, The Jewish Museum, New York, the National Portrait Gallery, and the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. A survey show, Deborah Kass, The Warhol Project traveled across the country from 1999–2001. She is a Senior Critic in the Yale University M.F.A. Painting Program. Kass's later paintings often borrow their titles from song lyrics. Her series feel good paintings for feel bad times, incorporates lyrics borrowed from The Great American Songbook, which address history, power, and gender relations that resonate with Kass's themes in her own work. In Kass's first significant body of work, the Art History Paintings, she combined frames lifted from Disney cartoons with slices of painting from Pablo Picasso, Jasper Johns, Jackson Pollock, and other contemporary sources. Establishing appropriation as her primary mode of working, these early paintings also introduced many of the central concerns of her work to the present. Before and Happily Ever After, for example, coupled Andy Warhol’s painting of an advertisement for a nose job with a movie still of Cinderella fitting her foot into her glass slipper, touching on notions of Americanism and identity in popular culture. The Art History Paintings series engages critically with the history of politics and art making, especially exploring the power relationship of men and women in society. Deborah Kass's work reveals a personal relationship she shares with particular artworks, songs and personalities, many of which are referenced directly in her paintings. In 1992, Kass began The Warhol Project. Beginning in the 1960s, Andy Warhol’s paintings employed mass production through screen-printing to depict iconic American products and celebrities. Using Warhol’s stylistic language to represent significant women in art, Kass turned Warhol’s relationship to popular culture on its head by replacing them with subjects of her own cultural interests. She painted artists and art historians that were her heroes including Cindy Sherman, Elizabeth Murray, and Linda Nochlin. Drawing upon her childhood nostalgia, the Jewish Jackie series depicts actress Barbra Streisand, a celebrity with whom she closely identifies, replacing Warhol's prints of Jackie Kennedy Onassis and Marilyn Monroe. Her My Elvis series likewise speaks to gender and ethnic identity by replacing Warhol's Elvis with Barbra Streisand from Yentl: a 1983 film in which Streisand plays a Jewish woman who dresses and lives as a man in order to receive an education in the Talmudic Law. Kass's Self Portraits as Warhol further deteriorates the idea of rigid gender norms and increasingly identifies the artist with Warhol. By appropriating Andy Warhol's print Triple Elvis and replacing Elvis Presley with Barbara Streisand’s Yentl, Kass is able to identify herself with history’s icons, creating a history with powerful women as subjects of art. The work embodies her concerns surrounding gender representation, advocates for a feminist revision of art, and directly challenges the tradition of patriarchy. America's Most Wanted is a series of enlarged black-and-white screen prints of fake police mug shots. The collection of prints from 1998–1999 is a late-1990s update of Andy Warhol’s 1964 work 13 Most Wanted Men, which featured the most wanted criminals of 1962. The “criminals” are identified in titles only by first name and surname initial, but in reality the criminals depicted are individuals prominent in today's art world. Some of the individuals depicted include Donna De Salvo, deputy director for international initiatives and senior curator at the Whitney Museum of American Art; Thelma Golden, director and chief curator of the Studio Museum in Harlem, and Robert Storr, dean of the Yale School of Art. Kass's subjects weren’t criminals. Through this interpretation, Kass show's how they are wanted by aspirants for their ability to elevate artists’ careers. The series explores the themes of authorship and the gaze, at the same time problematizing certain connotations within the art world. In 2002, Kass began a new body of work, feel good paintings for feel bad times, inspired, in part, by her reaction to the Bush administration. These works combine stylistic devices from a wide variety of post-war painting, including Ellsworth Kelly, Frank Stella, Jackson Pollock, Andy Warhol, and Ed Ruscha, along with lyrics by Stephen Sondheim, Laura Nyro, and Sylvester, among others, pulling from popular music, Broadway show tunes, the Great American Songbook, Yiddish, and film. The paintings view American art and culture of the last century through the lens of that time period's outpouring of creativity that was the result of post-war optimism, a burgeoning middle class, and democratic values. Responding to the uncertain political and ecological climate of the new century in which they have been made, Kass's work looks back on the 20th century critically and simultaneously with great nostalgia, throwing the present into high relief. Drawing, as always, from the divergent realms of art history, popular culture, political realities, and her own political and philosophical reflection, the artist continues into the present the explorations that have characterized her paintings since the 1980s in these new hybrid textual and visual works. OY/YO In 2015, Two Tree Management Art in Dumbo commissioned of a monumentally scaled installation of OY/YO for the Brooklyn Bridge Park. The sculpture, measuring 8×17×5 ft., consists of big yellow aluminum letters, was installed on the waterfront and was visible from the Manhattan. It spells “YO” against the backdrop of Brooklyn. The flip side, for those gazing at Manhattan, reads “OY.”[ An article and photo appeared on the front page of the New York Times 3 days after its installation in the park. An instant icon, OY/YO stayed at that site for 10 months where it became a tourist destination, a favorite spot for wedding, graduation, class photos and countless selfies. After its stay in Dumbo it moved to the ferry stop at North 6th Street in Williamsburg, Brooklyn for a year, where it greeted ferry riders. Since 2011, OY/YO has been a reoccurring motif in Deborah Kass's work in the form of paintings, prints, and tabletop sculptures. Kass first created “OY” as a painting riffing on Edward Ruscha’s 1962 Pop canvas, “OOF.” She later painted “YO” as a diptych that nodded to Picasso's 1901 self-portrait, “Yo Picasso” (“I, Picasso”). OY/YO is now installed in front of the Brooklyn Museum. Another arrived at Stanford University in front of the Cantor Arts Center late 2019. A large edition of OY/YO was acquired by the Jewish Museum in New York in 2017 and is on view in the exhibition Scenes from the Collection. On December 9, 2015 Deborah Kass introduced her new paintings that incorporated neon lights in an exhibition at Paul Kasmin Gallery entitled "No Kidding" in Chelsea, New York. The exhibition was an extension of her Feel Good Paintings for Feel Bad Times, but it sets a darker, tougher tone as she reflects on contemporary issues such as global warming, institutional racism, political brutality, gun violence, and attacks on women's health, through the lens of minimalism and grief. The series is ongoing. Deborah Kass has spoken about creating an “ode to the great Louises,” a space dedicated to her works inspired by famous Louise’s which she would call the “Louise Suite.” The earliest of these odes is “Sing Out Louise,” a 2002 oil on linen painting from her Feel Good Paintings Feel Bad Times collection. “Sing out Louise” is driven by her fondness for Rosalind Russel and the fact Kass feels it is her time to “Sing Out] “After Louise Bourgeois” is a 2010 sculpture made of neon and transformers on powder-coated aluminum monolith; it is a spiraling neon light with a phrase inspired by French-American artist Louise Bourgeois.[22] The neon installation reads “A woman has no place in the art world unless she proves over and over again that she won’t be eliminated.” Kass changed the quote slightly to better represent her beliefs but it was derived from Bourgeois. “After Louise Nevelson” is a 2020 spiraling neon work of art that reads "Anger? I'd be dead without my anger" a quote from American sculptor, Louise Nevelson. Award and Grants New York Foundation for the Arts, inducted into NYFA Hall of Fame (2014) Art Matters Inc. Grant (1996) Art Matters Inc. Grant (1992) New York Foundation for the Arts, Fellowship in Painting 1987 National Endowment for the Arts, Painting (1991) National Endowment For The Arts (1987) Selected solo and group exhibitions The Jewish Museum, New York, NY, “Scenes from the Collection” National Portrait Gallery, Washington, DC “Eye Pop: the Celebrity Gaze” Paul Kasmin Gallery, New York, NY, “No Kidding” (2015-2016) Sargent...
Category

2010s Pop Art Deborah Kass Art

Materials

Screen

Make Me Feel Mighty Real
By Deborah Kass
Located in New York, NY
Deborah Kass Make Me Feel Mighty Real, 2011 Silkscreen on wove paper Signed and numbered 9/35 by the artist on the front 23.5 x 18 inches Unframed Pencil signed and numbered from the...
Category

2010s Feminist Deborah Kass Art

Materials

Screen

C'Mon Get Happy
By Deborah Kass
Located in Boca Raton, FL
Iconic feminist artist, Deborah Kass is an American artist based in New York, whose work explores the intersection of pop culture, art history, and the construction of self. She is ...
Category

21st Century and Contemporary Contemporary Deborah Kass Art

Materials

Archival Pigment

VOTE HILLARY
By Deborah Kass
Located in New York, NY
Deborah Kass’ Vote Hillary, 2016 wryly updated Andy Warhol’s 1972 print of Richard Nixon. Under Warhol’s sinister green faced image, the artist wrote “Vote ...
Category

2010s Contemporary Deborah Kass Art

Materials

Silk

OY
By Deborah Kass
Located in Boca Raton, FL
Walking the line between respectful homage and tongue-in-cheek appropriation, Deborah Kass mimics and reworks the signature styles of iconic 20th-century male artists including Frank...
Category

2010s Contemporary Deborah Kass Art

Materials

Screen

YO
By Deborah Kass
Located in Boca Raton, FL
Walking the line between respectful homage and tongue-in-cheek appropriation, Deborah Kass mimics and reworks the signature styles of iconic 20th-century male artists including Frank...
Category

2010s Contemporary Deborah Kass Art

Materials

Screen

OY/YO Sculpture
By Deborah Kass
Located in Atlanta, GA
Deborah Kass
Category

2010s Contemporary Deborah Kass Art

Materials

Mixed Media

OY/YO
By Deborah Kass
Located in Boca Raton, FL
Polished aluminum, Ed. of 50 Walking the line between respectful homage and brazen appropriation, Deborah Kass mimics and reworks the signature styles of some of the 20th century’s most iconic male artists—including Frank Stella, Andy Warhol, Jackson Pollock, and Ed Ruscha—in her bold, meticulous paintings. “They’re my daddies...
Category

21st Century and Contemporary Contemporary Deborah Kass Art

Materials

Metal

Being Alive
By Deborah Kass
Located in Atlanta, GA
Deborah Kass
Category

2010s Contemporary Deborah Kass Art

Materials

Mixed Media

C'mon Get Happy
By Deborah Kass
Located in Atlanta, GA
Deborah Kass
Category

2010s Contemporary Deborah Kass Art

Materials

Archival Pigment

OY
By Deborah Kass
Located in New York, NY
OY Year: 2020 Medium: Color silkscreen and flocking on Rising 2-ply Museum Board Size: 32 x 30 inches (81 x 76 cm) Edition: 40 Price: Single: $3,600 Suite: $7,000 Deborah Kass emp...
Category

2010s Contemporary Deborah Kass Art

Materials

Screen

YO
By Deborah Kass
Located in New York, NY
YO Year: 2020 Medium: Color silkscreen and flocking on Rising 2-ply Museum Board Size: 32 x 30 inches (81 x 76 cm) Edition: 40 Price: Single: $3,600 Suite: $7,000 Deborah Kass emp...
Category

2010s Contemporary Deborah Kass Art

Materials

Screen

Sense and Sensibility, Abstract Screenprint by Deborah Kass
By Deborah Kass
Located in Long Island City, NY
Artist: Deborah Kass (American, 19452-) Title: Sense and Sensibility Year: 1987 Medium: Two Silkscreens (diptych), signed and numbered in penc...
Category

1980s Contemporary Deborah Kass Art

Materials

Screen

Untitled I, Abstract Lithograph and Screenprint by Deborah Kass
By Deborah Kass
Located in Long Island City, NY
Artist: Deborah Kass Title: Untitled - I Year: 1987 Medium: Silkscreen and Lithograph, signed and numbered in pencil, verso Edition: 22 Paper Size: 15.5 x 44 inches
Category

1980s Abstract Deborah Kass Art

Materials

Lithograph, Screen

16 Barbras (Jewish Jackie Series)
By Deborah Kass
Located in Wilton Manors, FL
Deborah Kass (b.1952). 16 Barbras (Jewish Jackie Series), 1992. 40 x 48 inches. Acrylic silkscreen inks on canvas. Signed, titled and dated in pencil en verso. Biography: (b. 1952, lives and works in Brooklyn, NY) Deborah Kass employs the visual motifs of post-war painting to explore the intersection of politics, popular culture, art history and personal identity. Her celebrated series, The Warhol Project, from the early 1990’s refocused Andy Warhol’s eye for celebrity portraiture. Her work incorporates lyrics from Broadway musicals, movie quotations and Yiddish sayings into canonical formats like Frank Stella’s concentric squares, Ellsworth Kelly’s rainbow spectrum and Andy Warhol’s camouflage patterns. Kass’s work is in the collection of the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, The Jewish Museum and the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, The National Portrait Gallery, among others. She is a Senior Critic in the Graduate Painting Program at Yale University. Recent solo and group exhibitions include The Pittsburgh Biennial at The Andy Warhol Museum; “The Deconstructive Impulse” at the Neuberger Museum of Art in Purchase, NY; “feel good paintings for feel bad times” and “MORE feel good paintings for feel bad times” at Paul Kasmin Gallery; and “Shifting the Gaze: Painting and Feminism” at The Jewish Museum in New York, NY. In 2012, The Andy Warhol Museum hosted “Deborah Kass: Before and Happily Ever After, a Mid-Career Retrospective.” Kass’s work was also featured in the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s “Regarding Warhol: Sixty Artists, Fifty Years.” SOLO EXHIBITIONS 2013 “My Elvis +,” PAUL KASMIN GALLERY, New York 2012 “Deborah Kass: Before and Happily Ever After, a Mid-Career Retrospective,” ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM, Pittsburgh, PA 2010 “MORE feel good paintings for feel bad times,” PAUL KASMIN GALLERY, New York 2007 “feel good paintings for feel bad times,” PAUL KASMIN GALLERY, New York “Armory Show,” PAUL KASMIN GALLERY, New York 2001 “Deborah Kass: The Warhol Project,“ WEATHERSPOON ART GALLERY, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, NC 2000 “Deborah Kass: The Warhol Project,” UNIVERSITY ART MUSEUM, University of California at Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA “Deborah Kass: The Warhol Project,” BLAFFER GALLERY, University of Houston, Houston, TX 1999 “Deborah Kass: The Warhol Project,” NEWCOMBE ART GALLERY, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA (traveling, catalogue) 1998 ARTHUR ROGER GALLERY, New Orleans, LA 1996 “My Andy: a retrospective,” Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art and Design, Kansas City, MO 1995 “My Andy: a retrospective,” JOSE FREIRE FINE ART, New York “My Andy: a retrospective,” ARTHUR ROGER GALLERY, New Orleans, LA 1994 BARBARA KRAKOW GALLERY, Boston, MA 1993 “Chairman Ma,” JOSE FREIRE FINE ART, New York “Chairman Ma,” ARTHUR ROGER GALLERY, New Orleans, LA 1992 “The Jewish Jackie Series and My Elvis,” FICTION/NONFICTION, New York “The Jewish Jackie Series,” SIMON WATSON, New York 1990 SIMON WATSON GALLERY, New York 1988 SCOTT HANSON...
Category

1990s Pop Art Deborah Kass Art

Materials

Acrylic

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21st Century and Contemporary Conceptual Deborah Kass Art

Materials

Screen

"OY YO" DIPTYCH
"OY YO" DIPTYCH
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H 25 in W 23.5 in

Deborah Kass art for sale on 1stDibs.

Find a wide variety of authentic Deborah Kass art available for sale on 1stDibs. If you’re browsing the collection of art to introduce a pop of color in a neutral corner of your living room or bedroom, you can find work that includes elements of yellow, purple, orange and other colors. You can also browse by medium to find art by Deborah Kass in screen print, archival pigment print, mixed media and more. Much of the original work by this artist or collective was created during the 21st century and contemporary and is mostly associated with the contemporary style. Not every interior allows for large Deborah Kass art, so small editions measuring 14 inches across are available. Customers who are interested in this artist might also find the work of Barbara Takenaga, Claire Lieberman, and Paula Scher. Deborah Kass art prices can differ depending upon medium, time period and other attributes. On 1stDibs, the price for these items starts at $720 and tops out at $10,620, while the average work can sell for $2,832.

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