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Artist: Frank Weston Benson
"TWO MALLARDS" FLYING DUCKS FRAMED 23.25 X 27.25
By Frank Weston Benson
Located in San Antonio, TX
Frank Weston Benson (1862-1951) Massachusetts Image Size: 15.5 x 15.5 Frame Size: 23.25 x 27.25 Medium: Charcoal on Paper Dated 1930 "Two Mallards Biography Frank Weston Benson (1862...
Category

1930s Realist Frank Weston Benson Art

Materials

Charcoal

Sun Glare, 1923
By Frank Weston Benson
Located in New York, NY
Frank Weston Benson paints a river surging through a forest landscape in his intriguing watercolor rendering entitled, “Sun Glare.”
Category

Early 20th Century Impressionist Frank Weston Benson Art

Materials

Paper, Watercolor, Pencil

Firelight, 1893
By Frank Weston Benson
Located in New York, NY
Renowned portraitist Frank West Benson paints a young woman by the fireplace reclining in a chair in his artwork entitled, “Firelight.”
Category

Late 19th Century Impressionist Frank Weston Benson Art

Materials

Canvas, Oil

Frank Weston Benson Original Etching, Early 20th Century
By Frank Weston Benson
Located in Larchmont, NY
Frank Weston Benson (American, 1862-1951) Untitled, 20th Century Etching Sight: 10 1/3 x 12 1/8 in. Framed: 16 3/4 x 19 x 1/2 in. Signed lower left Numb...
Category

20th Century Modern Frank Weston Benson Art

Materials

Etching

Mount Monadnock
By Frank Weston Benson
Located in Milford, NH
An exceptional watercolor of Mount Monadnock snow capped in winter in New Hampshire by American artist Frank Weston Benson (1862-1951). Benson was born in Salem, Massachusetts and went on to study in Boston at the Museum School of Fine Arts and later with Julian Lefebvre and Gustave Boulanger at the Academie Julian in Paris. Benson was well known for his impressionist landscapes and seascapes, and etchings of hunting scenes. Watercolor on paper, signed lower left F.W. Benson with inscription “To Mrs Bush,” titled on Vose Galleries...
Category

Early 20th Century American Impressionist Frank Weston Benson Art

Materials

Paper, Watercolor

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"Train Station, " Max Kuehne, Industrial City Scene, American Impressionism
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Located in New York, NY
Max Kuehne (1880 - 1968) Train Station, circa 1910 Watercolor on paper 8 1/4 x 10 1/4 inches Signed lower right Provenance: Private Collection, Illinois Max Kuehne was born in Halle, Germany on November 7, 1880. During his adolescence the family immigrated to America and settled in Flushing, New York. As a young man, Max was active in rowing events, bicycle racing, swimming and sailing. After experimenting with various occupations, Kuehne decided to study art, which led him to William Merritt Chase's famous school in New York; he was trained by Chase himself, then by Kenneth Hayes Miller. Chase was at the peak of his career, and his portraits were especially in demand. Kuehne would have profited from Chase's invaluable lessons in technique, as well as his inspirational personality. Miller, only four years older than Kuehne, was another of the many artists to benefit from Chase's teachings. Even though Miller still would have been under the spell of Chase upon Kuehne's arrival, he was already experimenting with an aestheticism that went beyond Chase's realism and virtuosity of the brush. Later Miller developed a style dependent upon volumetric figures that recall Italian Renaissance prototypes. Kuehne moved from Miller to Robert Henri in 1909. Rockwell Kent, who also studied under Chase, Miller, and Henri, expressed what he felt were their respective contributions: "As Chase had taught us to use our eyes, and Henri to enlist our hearts, Miller called on us to use our heads." (Rockwell Kent, It's Me O Lord: The Autobiography of Rockwell Kent. New York: Dodd, Mead and Co., 1955, p. 83). Henri prompted Kuehne to search out the unvarnished realities of urban living; a notable portion of Henri's stylistic formula was incorporated into his work. Having received such a thorough foundation in art, Kuehne spent a year in Europe's major art museums to study techniques of the old masters. His son Richard named Ernest Lawson as one of Max Kuehne's European traveling companions. In 1911 Kuehne moved to New York where he maintained a studio and painted everyday scenes around him, using the rather Manet-like, dark palette of Henri. A trip to Gloucester during the following summer engendered a brighter palette. In the words of Gallatin (1924, p. 60), during that summer Kuehne "executed some of his most successful pictures, paintings full of sunlight . . . revealing the fact that he was becoming a colorist of considerable distinction." Kuehne was away in England the year of the Armory Show (1913), where he worked on powerful, painterly seascapes on the rocky shores of Cornwall. Possibly inspired by Henri - who had discovered Madrid in 1900 then took classes there in 1906, 1908 and 1912 - Kuehne visited Spain in 1914; in all, he would spend three years there, maintaining a studio in Granada. He developed his own impressionism and a greater simplicity while in Spain, under the influence of the brilliant Mediterranean light. George Bellows convinced Kuehne to spend the summer of 1919 in Rockport, Maine (near Camden). The influence of Bellows was more than casual; he would have intensified Kuehne's commitment to paint life "in the raw" around him. After another brief trip to Spain in 1920, Kuehne went to the other Rockport (Cape Ann, Massachusetts) where he was accepted as a member of the vigorous art colony, spearheaded by Aldro T. Hibbard. Rockport's picturesque ambiance fulfilled the needs of an artist-sailor: as a writer in the Gloucester Daily Times explained, "Max Kuehne came to Rockport to paint, but he stayed to sail." 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Previously Available Items
A Strike
By Frank Weston Benson
Located in New York, NY
Watercolor on paper, en grisaille, 10 3/4 x 10 3/4 in. Signed and dated (at lower left): F. W. Benson. 1907. RECORDED: Patricia Jobe Pierce, The Ten (Hingham, Massachusetts: Pierce Galleries, Inc., 1976), p. 49 illus. as “Two Men Fishing” EX COLL: [Marine Arts Gallery, Salem, Massachusetts]; [Vincent J. LaFlamme, Castine, Maine]; to Robert C. Vose, Jr., Boston, Massachusetts; [Vose Galleries, Boston, 1975]; to private collection, Tahoe City, California, 1976, until the present One of the most successful painters working in Boston during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, Frank Benson melded the light and coloristic concerns of Impressionism with the solid draftsmanship, structured designs, and fine craftsmanship associated with academicism––an approach that collectors and critics of his day found highly appealing. A dedicated artist who created his own niche in a highly competitive art world, Benson explored a variety of motifs that reflected his personal life and interests, ranging from joyous portrayals of his wife and children to sparkling views of the New England coastline and countryside where he spent his summers. Benson also set himself apart from his contemporaries by creating classic sporting scenes and images of wildfowl, deftly melding accuracy of representation with his enduring concern for light. He also applied his brush to sensuous still lifes featuring exotic family heirlooms. Benson’s aesthetic versatility was also manifested through his use of different media and his innate command of oil, watercolor, and etching. Born into one of the oldest families in Salem, Massachusetts, Benson was the son of George Wiggin Benson, an affluent cotton merchant, and his wife, Elisabeth Frost Poole, an amateur painter. Along with his five siblings, he grew up in a comfortable house owned by his grandfather, Samuel Benson, a sea captain in the China trade who accumulated an enviable collection of oriental antiques during his travels to the Far East. Having been exposed to art and culture while growing up, Bensondecided to pursue an artistic career at age sixteen. He subsequently received a thorough grounding in traditional painting techniques at the Boston Museum School, where he studied under Otto Grundman and Frederic Crowninshield from 1880 to 1883. In 1883, accompanied by his friend and classmate Edmund C. Tarbell (1862–1938), Benson went to Paris, refining his skills as a figure painter at the Académie Julian under Gustave-Rodolphe Boulanger and Jules-Joseph Lefebvre. During the summer of 1884, he investigated plein-air painting techniques while visiting Concarneau, Brittany, a popular gathering place for artists of all nationalities. Benson was no doubt pleased when his After the Storm (1884; Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, Massachusetts), a portrayal of a Breton peasant woman and her daughter standing by the sea, was featured in the annual exhibition of the Royal Academy in London in 1885. Benson first delved into teaching in 1881, when he taught evening drawing classes for the town of Salem. He continued this pursuit upon returning from Europe in 1885, giving instruction in drawing and painting techniques at the Portland Society of Art in Maine in 1887 and 1888. In 1889, Benson began a lengthy tenure at the Museum School (where Tarbell had also received an appointment), initially teaching the antique class. Four years later, he was appointed an instructor at his alma mater, teaching drawing and painting classes until 1912, when he changed his status to that of a visiting instructor. During these years, Benson undertook portrait commissions from well-to-do Bostonians in addition to painting outdoor landscapes on seasonal visits to New Hampshire. He also began exhibiting his work locally, as well as in New York, at the annuals of the Society of American Artists and at the National Academy of Design, where he would later be elected an associate member (1897) and a full academician (1905). Following his marriage in 1888 to Ellen Pierson (who also hailed from Salem), Benson settled in his hometown but maintained a studio at various locales in Boston until 1944. Throughout the late 1880s and early 1890s, Benson focused his attention on intimate depictions of genteel young women in well-appointed interiors illuminated by subdued artificial light, as in works such as By Firelight (1889; private collection). However, as he became increasingly interested in the effects of outdoor luminosity, Benson changed course and after 1898 turned his attention to dazzling, impressionist-inspired images of family members (notably his wife, son, and three daughters) relaxing in idyllic sun-dappled settings, as in The Sisters (1899; Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection). Throughout these years, Benson exhibited his work in solo and group exhibitions at local venues such as the Boston Art Club, the St. Botolph Club, and Chase’s Gallery. His profile on the national art scene was given a major boost through his membership in Ten American Painters, an informal exhibiting organization composed of well-established artists (primarily impressionists) from New York and Boston who banded together in opposition to the restrictive policies set forth by the now more conservative Society of American Artists. Along with his fellow members––Tarbell, J. Alden Weir, Robert Reid, Thomas Wilmer Dewing, Edward Simmons, Willard Metcalf, Joseph De Camp, Childe Hassam, John Henry Twachtman––Benson displayed some of his finest work at the annuals of The Ten, which continued to exhibit together until 1918. (After Twachtman’s death in 1902, his place was taken by William Merritt Chase.) Benson also participated in other major group shows at museums and galleries throughout the country. In fact, his paintings received so many awards and honors, including silver medals at the Paris Exposition (1900) and the Pan-American Exposition in Buffalo (1901) and a gold medal at the Louisiana Purchase Exposition, held in St. Louis in 1904, that he became known as the most medaled American artist of his day. Benson made a good living from the sale of his art, so much so that in 1906 he purchased Wooster Farm, a colonial farmhouse in North Haven, Maine, on Penobscot Bay, where he and his family had been spending their summers since 1901. In the ensuing years, Benson’s commercial success continued as he expanded his repertoire of media and motifs. Indeed, in the wake of the Armory Show of 1913, as the stylish Boston School paintings of lovely young ladies came to be seen as outmoded, Benson (in keeping with the business acumen he inherited from his father and grandfather) shifted his iconographical concerns from the feminine to the masculine domain by turning increasingly to fishing and hunting themes––motifs that first occupied his attention during the late 1890s. (For this aspect of Benson’s oeuvre, see Faith Andrews Bedford, The Sporting Art of Frank W. Benson [Boston: David R. Godine, 2000].) An avid outdoorsman, Benson’s earliest sustained forays into sporting art took the form of etchings and drypoints that be began creating in 1912. However, during the 1920s and 1930s he explored this imagery in oil and watercolor, taking a special interest in the portrayal of birds in flight, as in Pintails Decoyed (1921; Museum of Fine Arts, Boston). His unique ability to combine a realistic rendering of his subject while continuing, as he put it, to “follow the light, where it comes from [and] where it goes to,” soon brought him widespread patronage, especially from fellow sporting enthusiasts, as well as a commission to design the Federal Duck Stamp in 1935 (Frank W. Benson, as quoted in Faith Andrews Bedford, “Frank W. Benson: Master of Light,” in Faith Andrews Bedford, et al., The Art of Frank Benson: American Impressionist, exhib. cat. [Salem: Peabody Essex Museum, 2001], p. 11). A prolific artist, Benson’s later oeuvre also includes opulent, light-filled still lifes. Prior to his death in Salem on November 14, 1951, he was honored with several retrospectives, the most significant of which was a joint exhibition with Tarbell held at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston in 1938. Benson’s love of piscatorial pursuits––especially salmon and trout fishing––is apparent in A Strike , which features two figures perched on a rocky ledge on the edge of a northern lake. While his comrade looks on, the man on the right steadies himself as he sweeps his rod backwards to secure the hook in the mouth of a struggling fish, a procedure known as “striking.” The painting was presumably inspired by a fishing outing that Benson may have taken during his annual summer visit to North Haven in 1907, when his roster of visitors that year included Willard Metcalf, who “enjoyed his peaceful times with Benson fishing and bird watching,” (Faith Andrews Bedford, “Frank W. Benson: A Biography,” in Faith Andrews Bedford, et al., Frank W. Benson: A Retrospective, exhib. cat. [New York Berry-Hill Galleries, 1989], p. 63). Benson also fished local, regional, and eastern Canadian waterways with his son, George, and other family members, as well as with artists such as Abbott Thayer and Philip Little...
Category

21st Century and Contemporary American Realist Frank Weston Benson Art

Materials

Paper, Watercolor

Teal
By Frank Weston Benson
Located in Missouri, MO
Frank Weston Benson (1862-1951) "Teal" 1925 (Paff 243) Etching Ed. 150 Signed Lower Left Image Size: approx 8 x 10 inches Framed Size: approx 14.5 x 16 inches Born in Salem, Massac...
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1920s American Realist Frank Weston Benson Art

Materials

Etching

The Alarm
By Frank Weston Benson
Located in Missouri, MO
Frank Weston Benson (1862-1951) "The Alarm" 1917 Etching Ed. 80 Signed Lower Right Image Size: approx 8 x 10 inches Framed Size: approx 14.5 x 16 inches Born in Salem, Massachusett...
Category

1910s Realist Frank Weston Benson Art

Materials

Etching

Two Canoes.
By Frank Weston Benson
Located in Storrs, CT
Two Canoes 1927. Etching. Paff catalog 266 state iii. 5 7/8 x 7 3/4 (sheet 9 x 11 1/4). Edition 150. An extremely rich impression with plate tone, printed on cream laid paper on the full sheet with deckle edges. Provenance: the artist's family. Signed in pencil. Housed in a 16 x 20-inch archival mat, suitable for framing. Frank W. Benson was born and raised in Salem, Massachusetts. He spent a great deal of time in the salt marshes that surrounded this costal town studying, as well as hunting, various waterfowl. He painted his first oil of shore birds at the age of twelve. At nineteen he attended the School of Drawing and Painting of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. While attending the school he produced his first etching, "Salem Harbor." In 1883 he traveled to Paris to study at the Academie Julie and for the next thirty years devoted his artistic talent to painting and watercolor. In 1912 at the age of fifty he again began to produce prints. At first, these prints were portraits, then of waterfowl and nature oriented subjects, totaling over 355 various prints before his death in 1951. Today, Benson is considered the founder of the school of American sporting art...
Category

1920s American Modern Frank Weston Benson Art

Materials

Etching, Drypoint

On the Kedgwick
By Frank Weston Benson
Located in Storrs, CT
On the Kedgwick 1923. Etching. Paff 222. 7 3/4 x 11 3/4 (sheet 11 1/2 x 15 9/16). Edition 150. Illustrated: Fine Prints of the Year, 1923. A rich impression in excellent condition, printed on cream laid paper on the full sheet with deckle edges. Signed in pencil. Housed in a 16 x 20- inch archival mat, suitable for your choice of frame. In the late summer of 1894, a friend invited Benson to go to New Brunswick, Canada, to fish for salmon. The artist discovered he loved the sport as well as camping out in the wilderness and thereafter made annual trips to Canada for almost 40 years. The Kedgwick River in New Brunswick was his favorite river for salmon fishing. Frank W. Benson was born and raised in Salem, Massachusetts. He sepnt a great deal of time in the salt marshes that surrounded this costal town studying, as well as hunting, various waterfowl. He painted his first oil of shore birds at the age of twelve. At nineteen he attended the School of Drawing and Painting of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. While attending the school he produced his first etching, "Salem Harbor." In 1883 he traveled to Paris to study at the Academie Julie and for the next thirty years devoted his artistic talent to painting and watercolor. In 1912 at the age of fifty he again began to produce prints. At first, these prints were portraits, then of waterfowl and nature oriented subjects, totaling over 355 various prints before his death in 1951. Today, Benson is considered the founder of the school of American sporting art...
Category

1920s American Modern Frank Weston Benson Art

Materials

Etching

Two Canoes
By Frank Weston Benson
Located in Storrs, CT
Two Canoes 1927. Etching. Paff 266.i/iii 5 7/8 x 7 3/4 (sheet 9 5/8 x 10 3/4). Trial proof A-5, prior to the edition 150. An extremely rich impression of a fascinating window into the way the artist developed the image. Housed in a 16 x 20-inch archival mat, suitable for your choice of frame. Frank W. Benson was born and raised in Salem, Massachusetts. He sepnt a great deal of time in the salt marshes that surrounded this costal town studying, as well as hunting, various waterfowl. He painted his first oil of shore birds at the age of twelve. At nineteen he attended the School of Drawing and Painting of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. While attending the school he produced his first etching, "Salem Harbor." In 1883 he traveled to Paris to study at the Academie Julie and for the next thirty years devoted his artistic talent to painting and watercolor. In 1912 at the age of fifty he again began to produce prints. At first, these prints were portraits, then of waterfowl and nature oriented subjects, totaling over 355 various prints before his death in 1951. Today, Benson is considered the founder of the school of American sporting art...
Category

1920s American Modern Frank Weston Benson Art

Materials

Etching, Drypoint

Two Canoes
Two Canoes
H 7.88 in W 7.75 in D 0.5 in
November Moon.
By Frank Weston Benson
Located in New York, NY
Signed in pencil. Etching and aquatint, 1931. Edition 150. Image size 9 13/16 x 8" (25.1 x 20.4 cm). Paff #316. Very good condition.
Category

1930s American Impressionist Frank Weston Benson Art

Materials

Etching

The Moose Caller.
By Frank Weston Benson
Located in New York, NY
Signed and numbered "10" in pencil. A very nice and rich impression. Etching, 1915. Edition 50. Image size 7 3/4 x 11 7/8" (19.7 x 30.2 cm). Good condi...
Category

1910s American Impressionist Frank Weston Benson Art

Materials

Etching

Geese.
By Frank Weston Benson
Located in Storrs, CT
Geese. 1917. Drypoint. Paff 124. 10 x 15 1/2 (sheet 13 3/16 x 17 3/4). Trial proof, before the edition of 79 proofs in 4 states. Illustrated: Salaman, Modern Masters of Etching: Fran...
Category

1910s American Modern Frank Weston Benson Art

Materials

Drypoint

Mallards
By Frank Weston Benson
Located in Storrs, CT
Mallards at Evening 1927. Drypoint. Paff 271. 13 7/8 x 11 7/8 (sheet 15 7/8 C 13 4/5). Edition 112. An extremely rich impression with drypoint burr, printed on the full sheet of crea...
Category

1920s Modern Frank Weston Benson Art

Materials

Drypoint

Frank Weston Benson art for sale on 1stDibs.

Find a wide variety of authentic Frank Weston Benson art available for sale on 1stDibs. You can also browse by medium to find art by Frank Weston Benson in etching, paint, canvas and more. Much of the original work by this artist or collective was created during the 20th century and is mostly associated with the modern style. Not every interior allows for large Frank Weston Benson art, so small editions measuring 12 inches across are available. Customers who are interested in this artist might also find the work of Marsden Hartley, Luigi Lucioni, and Charles Turzak. Frank Weston Benson art prices can differ depending upon medium, time period and other attributes. On 1stDibs, the price for these items starts at $2,250 and tops out at $595,000, while the average work can sell for $8,000.

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