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Mangiarotti M1

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Angelo Mangiarotti M1 T70 Table Grey Marble Skipper, 1969
By Angelo Mangiarotti, Skipper
Located in Roosendaal, Noord Brabant
Fantastic unique marble M1T70 dining table designed by Angelo Mangiarotti and manufactured by Skipper, Italy, 1969. This is for a solid and beautiful grey marble dining table. The li...
Category

Vintage 1960s Italian Mid-Century Modern Dining Room Tables

Materials

Marble

Angelo Mangiarotti M1 T70 Dining Table for Skipper, Italy, 1969
By Skipper, Angelo Mangiarotti
Located in London, GB
The M1 T70 table’s clean and elegant form is based around architect Angelo Mangiarotti’s desire to create an impressive table using substantial materials without any visible joints. ...
Category

20th Century Italian Mid-Century Modern Dining Room Tables

Materials

Marble

Angelo Mangiarotti 'M1' Dining Table for Skipper in Carrara Marble, Italy, 1958
By Skipper, Angelo Mangiarotti
Located in Amsterdam, NL
Angelo Mangiarotti 'M1' dining table for Skipper in Carrara marble, Italy, 1958 We have added this piece to our collection for a few reasons. The first one was the color of the ma...
Category

Vintage 1950s Italian Dining Room Tables

Materials

Carrara Marble

Angelo Mangiarotti Round Marble M1 Dining Table, Italy, 1960s-1970s
By Angelo Mangiarotti
Located in London, GB
A beautiful original Angelo Mangiarotti round marble M1 dining table for Skipper, Italy, 1960s-1970s. Grey/brown and white marble with wonderful character. Lit: Giuliana Gramigna,...
Category

Mid-20th Century Italian Mid-Century Modern Dining Room Tables

Materials

Marble

Angelo Mangiarotti for Skipper Round 'M1' Dining Table in Marble
By Angelo Mangiarotti
Located in Waalwijk, NL
Angelo Mangiarotti for Skipper, 'M1' dining table, marble, Italy, 1969 Angelo Mangiarotti designd the 'M1' dining table for Skipper in 1969. On a cone shaped pedestal rests the roun...
Category

Vintage 1970s Italian Mid-Century Modern Dining Room Tables

Materials

Carrara Marble

Angelo Mangiarotti White and Grey Marble Dining Table M1 Skipper, 1969
By Skipper, Angelo Mangiarotti
Located in Frankfurt / Dreieich, DE
White and grey marble dining table M1 by Angelo Mangiarotti for Skipper, Italy, 1969. Good to very good condition.
Category

Vintage 1960s Italian Mid-Century Modern Dining Room Tables

Materials

Carrara Marble

Angelo Mangiarotti M1 Marble Table
By Angelo Mangiarotti
Located in Geneva, CH
Arabescato marble dining table M1 by Angelo Mangiarotti Skipper, Italy, circa 1969 Very good condition, repolished.  
Category

Vintage 1960s Italian Dining Room Tables

Materials

Marble

  • Angelo Mangiarotti M1 Marble Table
  • Angelo Mangiarotti M1 Marble Table
  • Angelo Mangiarotti M1 Marble Table
  • Angelo Mangiarotti M1 Marble Table
H 28.75 in. Dm 51.19 in.
Angelo Mangiarotti M1 Carrara Marble Dining Table
By Angelo Mangiarotti
Located in Chicago, IL
Stunning Carrara marble dining table on conical pedestal base designed by Angelo Mangiarotti. The M1 T70 Table was designed by Mangiarotti in 1969 for Skipper. The architects vision ...
Category

Mid-20th Century Spanish Modern Dining Room Tables

Materials

Carrara Marble

Angelo Mangiarotti M1 T70 Dining Table
By Skipper, Angelo Mangiarotti
Located in London, GB
The M1 T70 table’s clean and elegant form is based around architect Angelo Mangiarotti’s desire to create an impressive table using substantial materials without any visible joints. ...
Category

20th Century Italian Mid-Century Modern Dining Room Tables

Materials

Marble

  • Angelo Mangiarotti M1 T70 Dining Table
  • Angelo Mangiarotti M1 T70 Dining Table
  • Angelo Mangiarotti M1 T70 Dining Table
  • Angelo Mangiarotti M1 T70 Dining Table
H 27.96 in. Dm 51.19 in. L 27.96 in.
Angelo Mangiarotti M1 T70 Dining Table Carrara Marble, Italy, 1969
By Angelo Mangiarotti
Located in Roosendaal, Noord Brabant
Stunning marble M1 dining table designed by Angelo Mangiarotti and manufactured by Skipper, Italy 1969. This is for a solid white Carrara marble dining table. The round top rests per...
Category

Vintage 1960s Italian Mid-Century Modern Dining Room Tables

Materials

Carrara Marble

Angelo Mangiarotti Dining Table M1 for Skipper, 1969
By Angelo Mangiarotti
Located in Munich, DE
Angelo Mangiarotti marble dining table model M1, designed for T70 and manufactured by Skipper in Italy, 1969. Two-piece construction of round, 3 cm thick tabletop with a lathe turned...
Category

Vintage 1960s Italian Mid-Century Modern Dining Room Tables

Materials

Carrara Marble

Angelo Mangiarotti Carrara Marble Dining Table Model M1 T70
By Angelo Mangiarotti
Located in Chicago, IL
Large round two-piece Carrara marble dining table by Angelo Mangiarotti. Model M1 T70 1969 and manufactured by Skipper in Italy. Lovely strong veining throughout and amazing marble...
Category

Vintage 1960s Italian Mid-Century Modern Dining Room Tables

Materials

Carrara Marble

Angelo Mangiarotti Marble Dining Table M1, Italy, 1969
By T70 Furniture 1, Angelo Mangiarotti
Located in Frankfurt / Dreieich, DE
Carrara Marble Dining Table by Angelo Mangiarotti for T 70, 1969, Italy. Excellent Condition! We offer a safe and fast worldwide shipping to your Front Door. We only ship with Ca...
Category

Vintage 1960s Italian Mid-Century Modern Dining Room Tables

Materials

Carrara Marble

Angelo Mangiarotti Marble Table Model M1 T70 Skipper, 1969
By Skipper, Angelo Mangiarotti
Located in Nice, Cote d' Azur
Angelo Mangiarotti, marble table model M1 T70 Skipper, two pieces construction of round, 3 cm thick tabletop and solid diabolic foot, white Carrara marble, circa 1969, Italy. Me...
Category

Vintage 1960s Italian Modern Dining Room Tables

Materials

Carrara Marble

Angelo Mangiarotti Biography and Important Works

Italian architect, designer, teacher and urban planner Angelo Mangiarotti (1921–2012) was a leading light in the international design community from the 1960s onward. While he was an adherent of the rationalist principles of purity of line and simplicity of construction, he sought to imbue his designs with a sense of character and lightness of spirit that was often lacking in late-20th-century modernist architecture and design. 


Born in Milan, Mangiarotti studied architecture at Milan Polytechnic, graduating in 1948. Five years later, he won a visiting professorship at the Illinois Institute of Technology — beginning a peripatetic academic career that would see him teaching in numerous Italian institutions as well as in schools as far afield as Hawaii and Australia. He worked with Bauhaus eminences Ludwig Mies van der Rohe and met such greats as Frank Lloyd Wright and Walter Gropius. He returned to Italy in 1955 and would go on to work on numerous industrial, residential, commercial and civic projects in his home country, most notably a group of six railway stations in Milan.


As a designer, Mangiarotti and the development of his career embodies the evolution of modernism in the latter decades of the20th century. In the late 1950s and early ’60s, after early experiments in plywood furniture and one-piece foam-core seating — including the 1110 lounge chair for Cassina — Mangiarotti began to design using more classic materials, from delicate, curvaceous blown-glass lamps for Artemide to chandeliers with crystal links for Vistosi. In 1971, Mangiarotti introduced what became his signature designs: a series of tables in marble and other stones that featured “gravity joints,” their legs held in place by the weight of the tabletop. Tables in his Eros collection (1971) have muscular proportions that anticipate the robust, overscaled lines of postmodern works that would appear 10 years later: His Eccentrico table, for example, is a striking assemblage in marble featuring a top that is cantilevered dramatically on a canted columnar base. 


But simplicity and practicality were consistently the primary watchwords of Mangiarotti’s designs. The purity and elegance of the objects he created offer a graceful counterpoint to a traditional decor, yet they have a singular sculptural presence that allows them to stand out powerfully in a modern interior.


Finding the Right Dining Room Tables for You

Modern furniture design borrows significantly from the trends of yore, and this is especially apparent in dining room tables. Ancient Egyptians made practical use of the earliest four-legged tables of wood and rock — their models bear striking similarity to our own — while common large medieval dining room tables in England were made of oak or elm. Romans and Greeks, renowned for big banquets that involved entertainment as well as good food, used early dining room tables made of marble or wood and metals such as bronze for meals. 

On 1stDibs, find a range of dining room tables that offers no shortage of options to accommodate modest interiors, midsize family homes and even lavish banquets (entertainment not included).

Beginning in the mid-19th century, more American homes featured dining rooms, where families could gather specifically for a meal together. In the States, upper-class families were the first to enjoy dining room tables, which were the centerpiece of the dining room

Dining room tables of the Victorian era were created in a range of revivalist styles inspired by neoclassical, Renaissance, Gothic and other traditions. Furnishings of the period were made of various woods, including oak, rosewood and mahogany, and referenced a variety of decorative arts and architectural motifs. Some dining room tables finished in the Rococo style feature gorgeous inlaid marble tabletops or other ornamental flourishes handcrafted by Parisian furniture makers of the 18th century.

In many modern spaces, there often isn’t a dining room separate from the kitchen — instead, they frequently share real estate in a single area. Mid-century modern dining room tables, specifically created by designers such as Osvaldo Borsani, Edward Wormley and Alvar Aalto, are typically clean and uncomplicated designs for a dining area that’s adjacent to where the cooking is done. Furniture of this era hasn’t lost its allure for those who opt for a casual, contemporary and, yes, coveted aesthetic.

If you’re of the modern mindset that making and sharing meals should be one in the same — and perhaps large antique dining tables don’t mesh well with your style — consider a popular alternative. Working with a tighter space may mean that a round or oval dining room table, a design that references the festive meals of the medieval era, may be a better fit. Round dining room tables, particularly those that originated in the Art Deco period, still endure as a popular contemporary substitute for traditional rectangular dining tables. Giovanni Offredi’s Paracarro table for Saporiti Italia is a striking round table option that showcases the magnificent Italian industrial design of the 1970s.

No matter your style of choice, a shared meal is one of life’s true rewards. Why not treat your family and friends to a luxurious dining experience? Browse our top picks to find the perfect dining room table for this important occasion.