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Audrey Flack Art

American, b. 1931

Audrey Flack is best known for her Photorealist paintings and was one of the first artists to use photographs as the basis for painting. The genre, taking its cues from Pop art, incorporates depictions of the real and the regular, from advertisements to cars to cosmetics. 

Flack's photography, prints and paintings bring in everyday household items like tubes of lipstick, perfume bottles, Hispanic Madonnas, and fruit. These inanimate objects often disturb or crowd the pictorial space, which is often composed as table-top still lives. Flack often brings in actual accounts of history into her photorealist paintings, such as World War II (“Vanitas”) and Kennedy Motorcade. Women were frequently the subject of her photorealist paintings. 

In her neoclassical public sculpture of gilded bronze angels, muses, and goddesses, Flack mines Greek mythology, presenting the female in an array of archetypal guises. Though some critics have condemned her focus on the classical white female, Flack is an avowed feminist, and many of her sculptures seek to reinvent their subjects and source material.

Flack's early work in the 1950s was Abstract Expressionist; one such painting paid tribute to Franz Kline. Most influential among her early supporters was the Bauhaus artist Josef Albers. It was he who persuaded Flack to take up a scholarship at Yale with the mission of shaking up the institution's stuffy academic reputation.

The ironic kitsch themes in Flack's early work influenced Jeff Koons. But gradually, Flack became a New Realist and then evolved into Photorealism during the 1960s. Her move to the Photorealist style was in part because she wanted her art to communicate to the viewer. Flack was the first Photorealist painter to be added to the collection of the Museum of Modern Art in 1966. Between 1976 and 1978 she painted her “Vanitas” series, including the piece Marilyn.

In the early 1980s, Flack's artistic medium shifted from painting to sculpture. She describes this shift as a desire for "something solid, real, tangible. Something to hold and to hold on to." 

Flack discusses the fact that she is self-taught in sculpture. She incorporates religion and mythology into her sculpture rather than the historical or everyday subjects of her paintings. Her sculptures often demonstrate a connection to the female form, including a series of diverse, heroic women and goddess figures. These depictions of women differ from those of traditional femininity, but rather are athletic, older, and strong. As Flack describes them: "They are real yet idealized... the 'goddesses in everywoman.'"

Flack has claimed to have found the Photorealist movement too restricting and now gains much of her inspiration from Baroque art. She is currently represented by the Louis K. Meisel Gallery and Hollis Taggart Galleries. Her work is held in the collections of museums around the world, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Allen Memorial Art Museum, and the National Gallery of Australia in Canberra, Australia.

Flack was awarded the St. Gaudens Medal from Cooper Union and the honorary Albert Dome professorship from Bridgeport University. She is an honorary professor at George Washington University, is currently a visiting professor at the University of Pennsylvania, and has taught and lectured extensively both nationally and internationally.

Find original Audrey Flack art for sale on 1stDibs.

(Biography provided by Lions Gallery)

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Artist: Audrey Flack
Audrey Flack On Painting (hand signed, dated and inscribed by Audrey Flack)
By Audrey Flack
Located in New York, NY
Audrey Flack Audrey Flack On Painting (hand signed, dated and inscribed by Audrey Flack), 1981 Hardback monograph with dust jacket (hand signed, dated and inscribed by Audrey Flack) ...
Category

1980s Photorealist Audrey Flack Art

Materials

Offset, Lithograph, Mixed Media, Ink, Paper

A Course in Miracles
By Audrey Flack
Located in New York, NY
Audrey Flack A Course in Miracles, 1984 Kodachrome 35mm Color Dye Transfer Print Dry mounted to 4 ply 100% cotton fiber board\ Hand signed and titled by Audrey Flack on the front 20 ...
Category

1980s Photorealist Audrey Flack Art

Materials

Board, Dye Transfer

Une Bouchee D'Amour (signed presentation print by female photorealist artist)
By Audrey Flack
Located in New York, NY
Audrey Flack Une Bouchee D'Amour, 2013 Mixed media: Digitized drawing with silkscreen Signed, titled and numbered recto (front) in graphite pencil Annotated presentation proof Frame included: in elegant vintage wood frame Print Club of New York, Publisher; Printer: Experimental Printmaking Institute, Lafayette College, Easton, PA Digitized drawing with silkscreen Flack's "Une Bouchee d'Amour" was the 2013 presentation print commissioned by The Print Club of New York, and it is accompanied by a COA issued by the Print Club of NY as well as Alpha 137...
Category

2010s Photorealist Audrey Flack Art

Materials

Mixed Media, Digital, Screen

Rolls Royce Lady (print about bling from the early 1980s by this photorealist)
By Audrey Flack
Located in New York, NY
Audrey Flack Rolls Royce Lady, 1984 Kodachrome 35mm Color Dye Transfer Print Dry, mounted to 4 ply 100% cotton fiber board Signed and titled in ink on the front 19 3/5 × 23 3/5 inche...
Category

1980s Photorealist Audrey Flack Art

Materials

Board, Dye Transfer

Esperanza
By Audrey Flack
Located in Fairlawn, OH
Esperanza Lithograph and screen print with gold leaf, 1972-3 Signed and numbered in pencil lower right (see photo) Edition: 11/150 From a portfolio of Ten Lithographs by Ten-Super-Re...
Category

1970s Photorealist Audrey Flack Art

Materials

Gold Leaf

The Nodes of Alvor Portugal
By Audrey Flack
Located in New York, NY
Audrey Flack The Nodes of Alvor Portugal, 1982 Watercolor on paper (bears original Louis Meisel Gallery label on the back) Pencil signed and titled by the...
Category

1980s Realist Audrey Flack Art

Materials

Watercolor

Esperanza, Screenprint by Audrey Flack
By Audrey Flack
Located in Long Island City, NY
Esperanza by Audrey Flack, American (1931) Date: Circa 1972 Screenprint, signed and numbered in pencil Edition of 150 Size: 34 in. x 24 in. (86.36 cm x 60.96 cm) Published by Shorewood
Category

1970s Photorealist Audrey Flack Art

Materials

Screen

Pop Art Vintage Photograph Dye Transfer Print "Leonardo's Lady" Audrey Flack
By Audrey Flack
Located in Surfside, FL
Hand signed and titled in ink by the artist from edition of 50 (plus proofs). Color Photo printed at CVI Lab by master printer Guy Stricherz. Published by Prestige Art Ltd. From the color saturated 1980's. A portrait by Leonardo da Vinci, nail polish, a pink rose, pocket watch, green pear. "Leonardo's Lady" a still life tableaux. Audrey L. Flack (born May 30, 1931 in New York City, New York) is an American artist. Her work pioneered the art genre of photorealism; her work encompasses painting, sculpture, and photography. From Audrey Flack: 12 Photographs 1973 to 1983. A set of this portfolio is in the collections of the Harvard Art Museums. The Kodakchrome photos were photgraphed with a NIkon camera, the Ektachrome photographs were taken with a Hasselblad camera. Each negative was printed on a 20 X24 inche fiber based paper, dry mounted wth seal MT5 dry mounting tissue to 4 ply 100% cotton fiber board by Arnon Ben-David and Ari Rivera Gonzales under the supervision of Carol Brower. Flack has numerous academic degrees, including both a graduate and an honorary doctorate degree from Cooper Union in New York City. Additionally she has a bachelor's degree in Fine Arts from Yale University and attended New York University Institute of Fine Arts where she studied art history. In May 2015, Flack received an honorary Doctor of Fine Arts degree from Clark University, where she also gave a commencement address. Flack's work is displayed in several major museums, including the Museum of Modern Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. Flack's photorealist paintings were the first such paintings to be purchased for the Museum of Modern Art’s permanent collection, and her legacy as a photorealist lives on to influence many American and International artists today. J. B. Speed Art Museum in Louisville, Kentucky, organized a retrospective of her work, and Flack’s pioneering efforts into the world of photorealism popularized the genre to the extent that it remains today. Flack attended New York's High School of Music & Art. She studied fine arts in New York from 1948 to 1953, studying under Josef Albers among others. She earned a graduate degree and received an honorary doctorate from Cooper Union in New York City, and a Bachelor of Fine Arts from Yale University. She studied art history at the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University. 1953 New York University Institute of Fine Arts, New York City 1952 BFA, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 1948-51 Cooper Union, New York City Career Flack's early work in the 1950s was abstract expressionist; one such painting paid tribute to Franz Kline. Most influential amongst her early supporters was the Bauhaus artist Josef Albers. It was he who persuaded Flack to take up a scholarship at Yale with the mission of shaking up the institution's stuffy academic reputation. The ironic kitsch themes in her early work influenced Jeff Koons. But gradually, Flack became a New Realist and then evolved into photorealism during the 1960s. Her move to the photorealist style was in part because she wanted her art to communicate to the viewer. She was the first photorealist painter to be added to the collection of the Museum of Modern Art in 1966. Between 1976 and 1978 she painted her Vanitas series, including the piece Marilyn. The critic Graham Thompson wrote, "One demonstration of the way photography became assimilated into the art world is the success of photorealist painting in the late 1960s and early 1970s. It is also called super-realism, radical realism, or hyper-realism and painters like Richard Estes, Chuck Close, and Audrey Flack as well, often worked from photographic stills to create paintings that appeared to be photographs." In the early 1980s Flack's artistic medium shifted from painting to sculpture. She describes this shift as a desire for "something solid, real, tangible. Something to hold and to hold on to." Flack discusses the fact that she is self-taught in sculpture. She incorporates religion and mythology into her sculpture rather than the historical or everyday subjects of her paintings. Her sculptures often demonstrate a connection to the female form, including a series of diverse, heroic women and goddess figures. These depictions of women differ from those of traditional femininity, but rather are athletic, older, and strong. As Flack describes them: "they are real yet idealized... the 'goddesses in everywoman.'" Flack has claimed to have found the photorealist movement too restricting, and now gains much of her inspiration from Baroque art. Flack is currently represented by the Louis K. Meisel Gallery and Hollis Taggart Galleries. Her work is held in the collections of museums around the world, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Museum of Modern Art, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Allen Memorial Art Museum, and the National Gallery of Australia in Canberra, Australia. She was awarded the St. Gaudens Medal from Cooper Union, and the honorary Albert Dome professorship from Bridgeport University. She is an honorary professor at George Washington University, is currently a visiting professor at the University of Pennsylvania and has taught and lectured extensively both nationally, and internationally. Flack lives and works in New York City and Long Island. Audrey Flack is best known for her photo-realist paintings and was one of the first artists to use photographs as the basis for painting. The genre, taking its cues from Pop Art, incorporates depictions of the real and the regular, from advertisements to cars to cosmetics. Flack's work brings in everyday household items like tubes of lipstick, perfume bottles, Hispanic Madonnas, and fruit. These inanimate objects often disturb or crowd the pictorial space, which are often composed as table-top still lives. Flack often brings in actual accounts of history into her photorealist paintings, such as World War II' (Vanitas) and Kennedy Motorcade. Women were frequently the subject of her photo realist paintings. In her Neoclassical public sculpture of gilded bronze...
Category

1980s Photorealist Audrey Flack Art

Materials

Photographic Paper, C Print, Dye Transfer

Wheel of Fortune
By Audrey Flack
Located in Fairlawn, OH
Signed in ink From: 12 Photographs: 1973-1983, Plate 5 of 12 Dye transfer photograph, 1977 Edition: 50, this set are Artist's Proofs (7/10) Printer: Guy Stricherz Publisher: Prestige Art Ltd, 1984 Condition: Excellent Archival framing with OP3 Acrylic Note: “One of the first photorealist painters to be included in the Museum of Modern Art’s permanent collection, Audrey Flack focused the early years of her career on large-scale paintings of still lifes that drew from 17th-century Dutch vanitas painting—updated through a contemporary lens—and brought feminine identities under scrutiny. In meticulous, complex arrangements of fruit, flowers, candles, makeup, and ladies’ accouterments, Flack’s loaded symbolic tableaus address stereotypes of the female ideal. Since the 1980s, Flack has turned her focus to monumental sculpture: “Making sculpture attracted me because of its substantiality,” she has said. In her Neoclassical public sculptures of gilded bronze angels...
Category

1970s Photorealist Audrey Flack Art

Materials

Dye Transfer

Pop Art Vintage Color Photograph Dye Transfer Print "Royal Flush" Audrey Flack
By Audrey Flack
Located in Surfside, FL
Hand signed and titled in ink by the artist from edition of 50 (plus proofs). Color Photo printed at CVI Lab by master printer Guy Stricherz. Published by Prestige Art Ltd. From the color saturated 1980's. Royal Flush, cigars, Jack Daniels Whiskey, cash, playing cards and beer. Boys night out. perfect for the man cave or bachelor pad. Audrey L. Flack (born May 30, 1931 in New York City, New York) is an American artist. Her work pioneered the art genre of photorealism; her work encompasses painting, sculpture, and photography. From Audrey Flack: 12 Photographs 1973 to 1983. A set of this portfolio is in the collections of the Harvard Art Museums. The Kodakchrome photos were photgraphed with a NIkon camera, the Ektachrome photographs were taken with a Hasselblad camera. Each negative was printed on a 20 X24 inche fiber based paper, dry mounted wth seal MT5 dry mounting tissue to 4 ply 100% cotton fiber board by Arnon Ben-David and Ari Rivera Gonzales under the supervision of Carol Brower. Flack has numerous academic degrees, including both a graduate and an honorary doctorate degree from Cooper Union in New York City. Additionally she has a bachelor's degree in Fine Arts from Yale University and attended New York University Institute of Fine Arts where she studied art history. In May 2015, Flack received an honorary Doctor of Fine Arts degree from Clark University, where she also gave a commencement address. Flack's work is displayed in several major museums, including the Museum of Modern Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. Flack's photorealist paintings were the first such paintings to be purchased for the Museum of Modern Art’s permanent collection, and her legacy as a photorealist lives on to influence many American and International artists today. J. B. Speed Art Museum in Louisville, Kentucky, organized a retrospective of her work, and Flack’s pioneering efforts into the world of photorealism popularized the genre to the extent that it remains today. Flack attended New York's High School of Music & Art. She studied fine arts in New York from 1948 to 1953, studying under Josef Albers among others. She earned a graduate degree and received an honorary doctorate from Cooper Union in New York City, and a Bachelor of Fine Arts from Yale University. She studied art history at the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University. 1953 New York University Institute of Fine Arts, New York City 1952 BFA, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 1948-51 Cooper Union, New York City Career Flack's early work in the 1950s was abstract expressionist; one such painting paid tribute to Franz Kline. Most influential amongst her early supporters was the Bauhaus artist Josef Albers. It was he who persuaded Flack to take up a scholarship at Yale with the mission of shaking up the institution's stuffy academic reputation. The ironic kitsch themes in her early work influenced Jeff Koons. But gradually, Flack became a New Realist and then evolved into photorealism during the 1960s. Her move to the photorealist style was in part because she wanted her art to communicate to the viewer. She was the first photorealist painter to be added to the collection of the Museum of Modern Art in 1966. Between 1976 and 1978 she painted her Vanitas series, including the piece Marilyn. The critic Graham Thompson wrote, "One demonstration of the way photography became assimilated into the art world is the success of photorealist painting in the late 1960s and early 1970s. It is also called super-realism, radical realism, or hyper-realism and painters like Richard Estes, Chuck Close, and Audrey Flack as well, often worked from photographic stills to create paintings that appeared to be photographs." In the early 1980s Flack's artistic medium shifted from painting to sculpture. She describes this shift as a desire for "something solid, real, tangible. Something to hold and to hold on to." Flack discusses the fact that she is self-taught in sculpture. She incorporates religion and mythology into her sculpture rather than the historical or everyday subjects of her paintings. Her sculptures often demonstrate a connection to the female form, including a series of diverse, heroic women and goddess figures. These depictions of women differ from those of traditional femininity, but rather are athletic, older, and strong. As Flack describes them: "they are real yet idealized... the 'goddesses in everywoman.'" Flack has claimed to have found the photorealist movement too restricting, and now gains much of her inspiration from Baroque art. Flack is currently represented by the Louis K. Meisel Gallery and Hollis Taggart Galleries. Her work is held in the collections of museums around the world, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Museum of Modern Art, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Allen Memorial Art Museum, and the National Gallery of Australia in Canberra, Australia. She was awarded the St. Gaudens Medal from Cooper Union, and the honorary Albert Dome professorship from Bridgeport University. She is an honorary professor at George Washington University, is currently a visiting professor at the University of Pennsylvania and has taught and lectured extensively both nationally, and internationally. Flack lives and works in New York City and Long Island. Audrey Flack is best known for her photo-realist paintings and was one of the first artists to use photographs as the basis for painting. The genre, taking its cues from Pop Art, incorporates depictions of the real and the regular, from advertisements to cars to cosmetics. Flack's work brings in everyday household items like tubes of lipstick, perfume bottles, Hispanic Madonnas, and fruit. These inanimate objects often disturb or crowd the pictorial space, which are often composed as table-top still lives. Flack often brings in actual accounts of history into her photorealist paintings, such as World War II' (Vanitas) and Kennedy Motorcade. Women were frequently the subject of her photo realist paintings. In her Neoclassical public sculpture of gilded bronze angels...
Category

1980s Photorealist Audrey Flack Art

Materials

Photographic Paper, C Print, Dye Transfer

Pop Art Color Photograph Dye Transfer Print Audrey Flack Rolls Royce Lady Photo
By Audrey Flack
Located in Surfside, FL
Hand signed and titled in ink by the artist from edition of 50 (plus proofs). Color Photo printed at CVI Lab by master printer Guy Stricherz. Published by Prestige Art Ltd. From the color saturated 1980's. "Rolls Royce Lady" featuring a sculpture the Spirit of Ecstasy, a crystal goblet, dice, flowers, a pocket watch, jewelry, perfume and a red rose. Audrey L. Flack (born May 30, 1931 in New York City, New York) is an American artist. Her work pioneered the art genre of photorealism; her work encompasses painting, sculpture, and photography. From Audrey Flack: 12 Photographs 1973 to 1983. A set of this portfolio is in the collections of the Harvard Art Museums. The Kodakchrome photos were photgraphed with a NIkon camera, the Ektachrome photographs were taken with a Hasselblad camera. Each negative was printed on a 20 X24 inche fiber based paper, dry mounted wth seal MT5 dry mounting tissue to 4 ply 100% cotton fiber board by Arnon Ben-David and Ari Rivera Gonzales under the supervision of Carol Brower. Flack has numerous academic degrees, including both a graduate and an honorary doctorate degree from Cooper Union in New York City. Additionally she has a bachelor's degree in Fine Arts from Yale University and attended New York University Institute of Fine Arts where she studied art history. In May 2015, Flack received an honorary Doctor of Fine Arts degree from Clark University, where she also gave a commencement address. Flack's work is displayed in several major museums, including the Museum of Modern Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. Flack's photorealist paintings were the first such paintings to be purchased for the Museum of Modern Art’s permanent collection, and her legacy as a photorealist lives on to influence many American and International artists today. J. B. Speed Art Museum in Louisville, Kentucky, organized a retrospective of her work, and Flack’s pioneering efforts into the world of photorealism popularized the genre to the extent that it remains today. Flack attended New York's High School of Music & Art. She studied fine arts in New York from 1948 to 1953, studying under Josef Albers among others. She earned a graduate degree and received an honorary doctorate from Cooper Union in New York City, and a Bachelor of Fine Arts from Yale University. She studied art history at the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University. 1953 New York University Institute of Fine Arts, New York City 1952 BFA, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 1948-51 Cooper Union, New York City Career Flack's early work in the 1950s was abstract expressionist; one such painting paid tribute to Franz Kline. Most influential amongst her early supporters was the Bauhaus artist Josef Albers. It was he who persuaded Flack to take up a scholarship at Yale with the mission of shaking up the institution's stuffy academic reputation. The ironic kitsch themes in her early work influenced Jeff Koons. But gradually, Flack became a New Realist and then evolved into photorealism during the 1960s. Her move to the photorealist style was in part because she wanted her art to communicate to the viewer. She was the first photorealist painter to be added to the collection of the Museum of Modern Art in 1966. Between 1976 and 1978 she painted her Vanitas series, including the piece Marilyn. The critic Graham Thompson wrote, "One demonstration of the way photography became assimilated into the art world is the success of photorealist painting in the late 1960s and early 1970s. It is also called super-realism, radical realism, or hyper-realism and painters like Richard Estes, Chuck Close, and Audrey Flack as well, often worked from photographic stills to create paintings that appeared to be photographs." In the early 1980s Flack's artistic medium shifted from painting to sculpture. She describes this shift as a desire for "something solid, real, tangible. Something to hold and to hold on to." Flack discusses the fact that she is self-taught in sculpture. She incorporates religion and mythology into her sculpture rather than the historical or everyday subjects of her paintings. Her sculptures often demonstrate a connection to the female form, including a series of diverse, heroic women and goddess figures. These depictions of women differ from those of traditional femininity, but rather are athletic, older, and strong. As Flack describes them: "they are real yet idealized... the 'goddesses in everywoman.'" Flack has claimed to have found the photorealist movement too restricting, and now gains much of her inspiration from Baroque art. Flack is currently represented by the Louis K. Meisel Gallery and Hollis Taggart Galleries. Her work is held in the collections of museums around the world, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Museum of Modern Art, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Allen Memorial Art Museum, and the National Gallery of Australia in Canberra, Australia. She was awarded the St. Gaudens Medal from Cooper Union, and the honorary Albert Dome professorship from Bridgeport University. She is an honorary professor at George Washington University, is currently a visiting professor at the University of Pennsylvania and has taught and lectured extensively both nationally, and internationally. Flack lives and works in New York City and Long Island. Audrey Flack is best known for her photo-realist paintings and was one of the first artists to use photographs as the basis for painting. The genre, taking its cues from Pop Art, incorporates depictions of the real and the regular, from advertisements to cars to cosmetics. Flack's work brings in everyday household items like tubes of lipstick, perfume bottles, Hispanic Madonnas, and fruit. These inanimate objects often disturb or crowd the pictorial space, which are often composed as table-top still lives. Flack often brings in actual accounts of history into her photorealist paintings, such as World War II' (Vanitas) and Kennedy Motorcade. Women were frequently the subject of her photo realist paintings. In her Neoclassical public sculpture of gilded bronze angels...
Category

1980s Photorealist Audrey Flack Art

Materials

Photographic Paper, C Print, Dye Transfer

Pop Art Vintage Color Photograph Dye Transfer Print "Queen" Audrey Flack Photo
By Audrey Flack
Located in Surfside, FL
Hand signed and titled in ink by the artist from edition of 50 (plus proofs). Color Photo printed at CVI Lab by master printer Guy Stricherz. Published by Prestige Art Ltd. From the color saturated 1980's. "Queen" featuring a red rose, paint, a cameo portrait locket, makeup, a chess piece, a pocket watch and a red lucite dice piece . Audrey L. Flack (born May 30, 1931 in New York City, New York) is an American artist. Her work pioneered the art genre of photorealism; her work encompasses painting, sculpture, and photography. From Audrey Flack: 12 Photographs 1973 to 1983. A set of this portfolio is in the collections of the Harvard Art Museums. The Kodakchrome photos were photgraphed with a NIkon camera, the Ektachrome photographs were taken with a Hasselblad camera. Each negative was printed on a 20 X24 inche fiber based paper, dry mounted wth seal MT5 dry mounting tissue to 4 ply 100% cotton fiber board by Arnon Ben-David and Ari Rivera Gonzales under the supervision of Carol Brower. Flack has numerous academic degrees, including both a graduate and an honorary doctorate degree from Cooper Union in New York City. Additionally she has a bachelor's degree in Fine Arts from Yale University and attended New York University Institute of Fine Arts where she studied art history. In May 2015, Flack received an honorary Doctor of Fine Arts degree from Clark University, where she also gave a commencement address. Flack's work is displayed in several major museums, including the Museum of Modern Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. Flack's photorealist paintings were the first such paintings to be purchased for the Museum of Modern Art’s permanent collection, and her legacy as a photorealist lives on to influence many American and International artists today. J. B. Speed Art Museum in Louisville, Kentucky, organized a retrospective of her work, and Flack’s pioneering efforts into the world of photorealism popularized the genre to the extent that it remains today. Flack attended New York's High School of Music & Art. She studied fine arts in New York from 1948 to 1953, studying under Josef Albers among others. She earned a graduate degree and received an honorary doctorate from Cooper Union in New York City, and a Bachelor of Fine Arts from Yale University. She studied art history at the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University. 1953 New York University Institute of Fine Arts, New York City 1952 BFA, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 1948-51 Cooper Union, New York City Career Flack's early work in the 1950s was abstract expressionist; one such painting paid tribute to Franz Kline. Most influential amongst her early supporters was the Bauhaus artist Josef Albers. It was he who persuaded Flack to take up a scholarship at Yale with the mission of shaking up the institution's stuffy academic reputation. The ironic kitsch themes in her early work influenced Jeff Koons. But gradually, Flack became a New Realist and then evolved into photorealism during the 1960s. Her move to the photorealist style was in part because she wanted her art to communicate to the viewer. She was the first photorealist painter to be added to the collection of the Museum of Modern Art in 1966. Between 1976 and 1978 she painted her Vanitas series, including the piece Marilyn. The critic Graham Thompson wrote, "One demonstration of the way photography became assimilated into the art world is the success of photorealist painting in the late 1960s and early 1970s. It is also called super-realism, radical realism, or hyper-realism and painters like Richard Estes, Chuck Close, and Audrey Flack as well, often worked from photographic stills to create paintings that appeared to be photographs." In the early 1980s Flack's artistic medium shifted from painting to sculpture. She describes this shift as a desire for "something solid, real, tangible. Something to hold and to hold on to." Flack discusses the fact that she is self-taught in sculpture. She incorporates religion and mythology into her sculpture rather than the historical or everyday subjects of her paintings. Her sculptures often demonstrate a connection to the female form, including a series of diverse, heroic women and goddess figures. These depictions of women differ from those of traditional femininity, but rather are athletic, older, and strong. As Flack describes them: "they are real yet idealized... the 'goddesses in everywoman.'" Flack has claimed to have found the photorealist movement too restricting, and now gains much of her inspiration from Baroque art. Flack is currently represented by the Louis K. Meisel Gallery and Hollis Taggart Galleries. Her work is held in the collections of museums around the world, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Museum of Modern Art, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Allen Memorial Art Museum, and the National Gallery of Australia in Canberra, Australia. She was awarded the St. Gaudens Medal from Cooper Union, and the honorary Albert Dome professorship from Bridgeport University. She is an honorary professor at George Washington University, is currently a visiting professor at the University of Pennsylvania and has taught and lectured extensively both nationally, and internationally. Flack lives and works in New York City and Long Island. Audrey Flack is best known for her photo-realist paintings and was one of the first artists to use photographs as the basis for painting. The genre, taking its cues from Pop Art, incorporates depictions of the real and the regular, from advertisements to cars to cosmetics. Flack's work brings in everyday household items like tubes of lipstick, perfume bottles, Hispanic Madonnas, and fruit. These inanimate objects often disturb or crowd the pictorial space, which are often composed as table-top still lives. Flack often brings in actual accounts of history into her photorealist paintings, such as World War II' (Vanitas) and Kennedy Motorcade. Women were frequently the subject of her photo realist paintings. In her Neoclassical public sculpture of gilded bronze...
Category

1980s Photorealist Audrey Flack Art

Materials

Photographic Paper, C Print, Dye Transfer

Pop Art Vintage Color Photograph Dye Transfer Print "Time to Save" Audrey Flack
By Audrey Flack
Located in Surfside, FL
Hand signed and titled in ink by the artist from edition of 50 (plus proofs). Color Photo printed at CVI Lab by master printer Guy Stricherz. Published by Prestige Art Ltd. From the ...
Category

1980s Photorealist Audrey Flack Art

Materials

Photographic Paper, C Print, Dye Transfer

Pop Art Color Photograph Dye Transfer Print Audrey Flack "Skull & Roses" Photo
By Audrey Flack
Located in Surfside, FL
Hand signed and titled in ink by the artist from edition of 50 (plus proofs). Color Photo printed at CVI Lab by master printer Guy Stricherz. Published by Prestige Art Ltd. From the ...
Category

1980s Photorealist Audrey Flack Art

Materials

Dye Transfer, Photographic Paper, C Print

Pop Art Vintage Color Photograph Dye Transfer Print "In My Life" Audrey Flack
By Audrey Flack
Located in Surfside, FL
Hand signed and titled in ink by the artist from edition of 50 (plus proofs). Color Photo printed at CVI Lab by master printer Guy Stricherz. Published by Prestige Art Ltd. From the color saturated 1980's. "In My Life" featuring flowers, a lit candle, dice, an Oriental rug, music notes. a pocket watch and a small porcelain box...
Category

1980s Photorealist Audrey Flack Art

Materials

Photographic Paper, C Print, Dye Transfer

Pop Art Vintage Color Photograph Dye Transfer Print Audrey Flack Fruits Photo
By Audrey Flack
Located in Surfside, FL
Hand signed and titled in ink by the artist from edition of 50 (plus proofs). Color Photo printed at CVI Lab by master printer Guy Stricherz. Published by Prestige Art Ltd. From the ...
Category

1980s Photorealist Audrey Flack Art

Materials

Photographic Paper, C Print, Dye Transfer

Pop Art Vintage Color Photograph Dye Transfer Print Audrey Flack Judaica Photo
By Audrey Flack
Located in Surfside, FL
Hand signed and titled in ink by the artist from edition of 50 (plus proofs). Color Photo printed at CVI Lab by master printer Guy Stricherz. Published by Prestige Art Ltd. From the ...
Category

1980s Photorealist Audrey Flack Art

Materials

Photographic Paper, C Print, Dye Transfer

Pop Art Color Photograph Dye Transfer Print Audrey Flack Tarot Card, Skull Photo
By Audrey Flack
Located in Surfside, FL
Hand signed and titled in ink by the artist from edition of 50 (plus proofs). Color Photo printed at CVI Lab by master printer Guy Stricherz. Published by Prestige Art Ltd. From the color saturated 1980's. "Wheel of Fortune" featuring a tarot card, a skull, lipstick, a crystal necklace, candle, mirror etc. Audrey L. Flack (born May 30, 1931 in New York City, New York) is an American artist. Her work pioneered the art genre of photorealism; her work encompasses painting, sculpture, and photography. From Audrey Flack: 12 Photographs 1973 to 1983. A set of this portfolio is in the collections of the Harvard Art Museums. The Kodakchrome photos were photgraphed with a NIkon camera, the Ektachrome photographs were taken with a Hasselblad camera. Each negative was printed on a 20 X24 inche fiber based paper, dry mounted wth seal MT5 dry mounting tissue to 4 ply 100% cotton fiber board by Arnon Ben-David and Ari Rivera Gonzales under the supervision of Carol Brower. Flack has numerous academic degrees, including both a graduate and an honorary doctorate degree from Cooper Union in New York City. Additionally she has a bachelor's degree in Fine Arts from Yale University and attended New York University Institute of Fine Arts where she studied art history. In May 2015, Flack received an honorary Doctor of Fine Arts degree from Clark University, where she also gave a commencement address. Flack's work is displayed in several major museums, including the Museum of Modern Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. Flack's photorealist paintings were the first such paintings to be purchased for the Museum of Modern Art’s permanent collection, and her legacy as a photorealist lives on to influence many American and International artists today. J. B. Speed Art Museum in Louisville, Kentucky, organized a retrospective of her work, and Flack’s pioneering efforts into the world of photorealism popularized the genre to the extent that it remains today. Flack attended New York's High School of Music & Art. She studied fine arts in New York from 1948 to 1953, studying under Josef Albers among others. She earned a graduate degree and received an honorary doctorate from Cooper Union in New York City, and a Bachelor of Fine Arts from Yale University. She studied art history at the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University. 1953 New York University Institute of Fine Arts, New York City 1952 BFA, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 1948-51 Cooper Union, New York City Career Flack's early work in the 1950s was abstract expressionist; one such painting paid tribute to Franz Kline. Most influential amongst her early supporters was the Bauhaus artist Josef Albers. It was he who persuaded Flack to take up a scholarship at Yale with the mission of shaking up the institution's stuffy academic reputation. The ironic kitsch themes in her early work influenced Jeff Koons. But gradually, Flack became a New Realist and then evolved into photorealism during the 1960s. Her move to the photorealist style was in part because she wanted her art to communicate to the viewer. She was the first photorealist painter to be added to the collection of the Museum of Modern Art in 1966. Between 1976 and 1978 she painted her Vanitas series, including the piece Marilyn. The critic Graham Thompson wrote, "One demonstration of the way photography became assimilated into the art world is the success of photorealist painting in the late 1960s and early 1970s. It is also called super-realism, radical realism, or hyper-realism and painters like Richard Estes, Chuck Close, and Audrey Flack as well, often worked from photographic stills to create paintings that appeared to be photographs." In the early 1980s Flack's artistic medium shifted from painting to sculpture. She describes this shift as a desire for "something solid, real, tangible. Something to hold and to hold on to." Flack discusses the fact that she is self-taught in sculpture. She incorporates religion and mythology into her sculpture rather than the historical or everyday subjects of her paintings. Her sculptures often demonstrate a connection to the female form, including a series of diverse, heroic women and goddess figures. These depictions of women differ from those of traditional femininity, but rather are athletic, older, and strong. As Flack describes them: "they are real yet idealized... the 'goddesses in everywoman.'" Flack has claimed to have found the photorealist movement too restricting, and now gains much of her inspiration from Baroque art. Flack is currently represented by the Louis K. Meisel Gallery and Hollis Taggart Galleries. Her work is held in the collections of museums around the world, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Museum of Modern Art, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Allen Memorial Art Museum, and the National Gallery of Australia in Canberra, Australia. She was awarded the St. Gaudens Medal from Cooper Union, and the honorary Albert Dome professorship from Bridgeport University. She is an honorary professor at George Washington University, is currently a visiting professor at the University of Pennsylvania and has taught and lectured extensively both nationally, and internationally. Flack lives and works in New York City and Long Island. Audrey Flack is best known for her photo-realist paintings and was one of the first artists to use photographs as the basis for painting. The genre, taking its cues from Pop Art, incorporates depictions of the real and the regular, from advertisements to cars to cosmetics. Flack's work brings in everyday household items like tubes of lipstick, perfume bottles, Hispanic Madonnas, and fruit. These inanimate objects often disturb or crowd the pictorial space, which are often composed as table-top still lives. Flack often brings in actual accounts of history into her photorealist paintings, such as World War II' (Vanitas) and Kennedy Motorcade. Women were frequently the subject of her photo realist paintings. In her Neoclassical public sculpture of gilded bronze...
Category

1980s Photorealist Audrey Flack Art

Materials

Photographic Paper, C Print, Dye Transfer

Pop Art Vintage Color Photograph "Course in Miracles" Print Audrey Flack Photo
By Audrey Flack
Located in Surfside, FL
Hand signed and titled in ink by the artist from edition of 50 (plus proofs). Color Photo printed at CVI Lab by master printer Guy Stricherz. Published by Prestige Art Ltd. From the color saturated 1980's. "A course in miracles"" The title, taken from the 1976 book on New Age spiritual guidance encourages speculation about each element in this still life. The amount of roses--three--is a significant number in many religions and mythologies. Besides Jesus and Albert Einstein, Flack included the silent mystic Hindu philanthropist Shree Krishnaji, also known as Baba. Flack used the detail of his face with the roses, hovering above the ocean, in her monumental painting, Baba. Following an illness, she turned to mysticism, framing Christian and Hindu images with Jewish ones in A Course of Miracles of 1983: On the “west” side, a photograph of Albert Einstein and a European Jewish candlestick...
Category

1980s Photorealist Audrey Flack Art

Materials

Photographic Paper, C Print, Dye Transfer

Wheel of Fortune
By Audrey Flack
Located in Fairlawn, OH
Signed and titled in ink by the artist From Audrey Flack: 12 Photographs 1973 to 1983. Edition: 50 (plus 10 AP and 4 trial) Printed: CVI Lab and master printer Guy Stricherz Published: Prestige Art Ltd. A set of this portfolio is in the collections of the Harvard Art Museums Flack... "One of the first photorealist painters to be included in the Museum of Modern Art’s permanent collection, Audrey Flack focused the early years of her career on large-scale paintings of still lifes that drew from 17th-century Dutch vanitas painting—updated through a contemporary lens—and brought feminine identities under scrutiny. In meticulous, complex arrangements of fruit, flowers, candles, makeup, and ladies’ accouterments, Flack’s loaded symbolic tableaus address stereotypes of the female ideal. Since the 1980s, Flack has turned her focus to monumental sculpture: “Making sculpture attracted me because of its substantiality,” she has said. In her Neoclassical public sculptures of gilded bronze angels...
Category

1980s Contemporary Audrey Flack Art

Materials

Photographic Paper

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Audrey Flack art for sale on 1stDibs.

Find a wide variety of authentic Audrey Flack art available for sale on 1stDibs. If you’re browsing the collection of art to introduce a pop of color in a neutral corner of your living room or bedroom, you can find work that includes elements of red and other colors. You can also browse by medium to find art by Audrey Flack in dye transfer print, paper, photographic paper and more. Much of the original work by this artist or collective was created during the 20th century and is mostly associated with the Photorealist style. Not every interior allows for large Audrey Flack art, so small editions measuring 11 inches across are available. Customers who are interested in this artist might also find the work of Beth Galton, Karol Kallay, and Masayoshi Sukita. Audrey Flack art prices can differ depending upon medium, time period and other attributes. On 1stDibs, the price for these items starts at $660 and tops out at $10,000, while the average work can sell for $2,500.
Questions About Audrey Flack Art
  • 1stDibs ExpertApril 5, 2022
    Audrey Flack, an American artist known in part for her photorealistic paintings, developed a technique in which she projected a photograph onto her canvas and used airbrushing techniques to paint her images. Shop a selection of Audrey Flack pieces from some of the world's top art dealers on 1stDibs.

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