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Marc Chagall Prints and Multiples

Original Marc Chagall lithographs as well as his other prints and paintings widely influenced the fantastic imagery of Surrealism and other movements of the 20th century. Known for his dreamlike creations inspired by folk art, Chagall drew on the colors and forms introduced by Cubism and Fauvism for a distinctive style all his own.

Chagall was born into an Orthodox Jewish family in Liozna, Belarus, and one of his earliest teachers was painter Yehuda Pen, who ran a school of drawing and painting in nearby Vitebsk in western Russia. In 1907, Chagall went to St. Petersburg to continue his art studies, including with painter Léon Bakst with whom he would later collaborate on set designs for the Ballets Russes.

Chagall relied on the patronage of the Jewish community to get past the restrictions on Jewish people in Russia, like Maxim Vinaver, who in 1911 supported Chagall in traveling to Paris to study. There, he found a studio in the maze of Montparnasse ateliers nicknamed “La Ruche” (“The Hive”) alongside many fellow Jewish artists from around Europe, such as Expressionist painter Chaïm Soutine and painter and sculptor Amedeo Modigliani. He also began a long friendship with abstract colorist Robert Delaunay and his wife, artist Sonia Delaunay-Terk, with Chagall bringing some of their ideas of vivid color into his subsequent work.

That first stay in Paris lasted four prolific years, with Chagall absorbing the ideas of French Impressionism and Fauvism, leading to complex and enigmatic pieces, including the 1913 Self-Portrait with Seven Fingers depicting the artist at work in his studio, a glimpse of the Eiffel Tower through the window, and the 1911 I and the Village evoking memories of his Jewish community in Belarus with the face of a goat and a man gazing at each other, enveloped by intersecting colors and shapes.

The outbreak of World War I, which unfolded when Chagall had returned to Russia for his fiancée Bella Rosenberg, cut off his return to Paris. During those years in Russia, he became extremely enthusiastic about the Russian Revolution, in particular its promise to grant full citizenship to Jewish people like him, and was named the Commissar for Art in Vitebsk, although he became disenchanted with its ideology and eventually resigned.

Chagall left the Soviet Union in 1922, living in Berlin and Paris again in 1923. The outbreak of World War II and the Nazi invasion of France compelled him to flee to the United States. (His monographs had been destroyed in Nazi book burnings and some of his works confiscated from museums and displayed as part of a “Degenerate Art” exhibition.) After the war, he returned to France, and throughout the rest of his life, he continued to expand his practice.

Chagall had created etchings of Russian life during the 1920s but would explore printmaking later more deeply, during the 1950s, when he sought guidance from veteran lithographer Charles Sorlier, who became a friend and collaborator.

Chagall’s vibrant and densely colorful prints are known around the world. There are rare single lithographs from the artist’s largest print portfolios that contain over two dozen colors. In 1960, he was commissioned to paint a new ceiling for the Opéra Garnier in Paris and stained-glass windows for the cathedrals in Metz and Reims around the same time. Chagall’s windows are celebrated today both for their narrative depth and rich swaths of color, and he granted permission to his printmaking associate Sorlier to create lithographs based on his works in stained glass.

Shop Marc Chagall signed lithographs and more of the artist's kaleidoscopic original prints, including figurative prints and landscape lithographs, on 1stDibs. 

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Artist: Marc Chagall
Bible Verve, Modern Lithograph by Marc Chagall
By Marc Chagall
Located in Long Island City, NY
A Biblical lithograph by Marc Chagall, printed by Mourlot and published by Éditions de la Revue Verve, Tériade, both in Paris, This piece is nicely framed and features a nude angel b...
Category

1950s Marc Chagall Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

Derriere le Miroir-Double Page (Behind the Looking Glass Double Page)
By Marc Chagall
Located in Fairlawn, OH
Derriere le Miroir-Double Page (Behind the Looking Glass Double Page) Original color llithogragp created by the artist for this ublication, 1964 Unsigned as issued From: Derriere le ...
Category

1960s French School Marc Chagall Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

Le Clown Blanc (The White Clown)
By Marc Chagall
Located in Fairlawn, OH
Le Clown Blanc (The White Clown) Lithograph, 1964 Unsigned (as issued by DLM) From: Derriere le Miroir Chagall: Dessins et Lavis, Exposition Chagall, Galeries Maeght, No. 146, 1964 E...
Category

1960s French School Marc Chagall Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

Le Village (The village)
By Marc Chagall
Located in Fairlawn, OH
Le Village (The village) Original lithograph in colors, lsied in the artist's catalog raisonne of his prints, 1977 From: Derriere le Miroir, No. 225, Edition 15,000 as published in ...
Category

1970s French School Marc Chagall Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

Marc Chagall-Green Bird Lithograph on Arches
By Marc Chagall
Located in Brooklyn, NY
Reference-MOURLOT 354, printer's proof, unsigned and not numbered. Color lithograph, 1962, on wove paper, published by Maeght, Paris, with full margins. Artwork may be viewed at our...
Category

1960s Modern Marc Chagall Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

"Ruth Gleaning" original lithograph
By Marc Chagall
Located in Henderson, NV
Medium: original lithograph. Printed by Mourlot and published in Paris by Teriade for the art revue Verve in 1960 for a special edition devoted exclusively to Chagall's original Bibl...
Category

1960s Marc Chagall Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

“Venice”
By Marc Chagall
Located in Southampton, NY
Description: People have collected autographs of notables for hundreds of years. The desire to have a personal memento from a famous and or important artist drives the collecting fie...
Category

1950s Modern Marc Chagall Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph, Archival Paper

Grandmother, from: My Life Die Grossmutter: Mein Leben - Autobiography
By Marc Chagall
Located in London, GB
This original etching with drypoint is hand signed in pencil by the artist "Marc Chagall" at the lower right margin. It is also hand numbered in pencil from the edition of 110, at t...
Category

1920s Surrealist Marc Chagall Prints and Multiples

Materials

Etching

Jacob’s Dream Le songe de Jacob - French Biblical Religious Scene Dream
By Marc Chagall
Located in London, GB
This original lithograph in colours is hand signed in pencil by the artist "Marc Chagall" at the lower right corner. It is also hand numbered in pencil from the edition of 50, at th...
Category

1970s Marc Chagall Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

1963 Marc Chagall 'Nature Morte Au Bouquet'
By Marc Chagall
Located in Brooklyn, NY
Paper Size: 12.5 x 9.75 inches ( 31.75 x 24.765 cm ) Image Size: 9.75 x 7.5 inches ( 24.765 x 19.05 cm ) Framed: No Condition: A-: Near Mint, very light signs of handling Addit...
Category

1960s Modern Marc Chagall Prints and Multiples

Materials

Offset

Bateau-Mouche au Bouquet (Mourlot 352; Cramer 53), Marc Chagall
By Marc Chagall
Located in Auburn Hills, MI
Original Limited Edition Lithograph on Arches paper. Edition: 180, plus proofs. Inscription: unsigned and unnumbered, as issued. Excellent Condition; never framed or matted. Notes: E...
Category

1960s Expressionist Marc Chagall Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

Double Portrait at the Easel, 1976 (M.835)
By Marc Chagall
Located in Greenwich, CT
Double Portrait at the Easel (M.835) is lithograph on paper, signed 'Marc Chagall' lower right and numbered XI/XV lower left, from the edition of 69 (there were also 50 Arabic and 4 ...
Category

20th Century Modern Marc Chagall Prints and Multiples

Materials

Paper, Lithograph

Marc Chagall -- La Chasse aux Oiseaux (The Bird Chase), from Daphnis et Chloé
By Marc Chagall
Located in BRUCE, ACT
Marc Chagall Title: La Chasse aux Oiseaux (The Bird Chase), from Daphnis et Chloé, 1961 Color lithograph on Arches paper Folded as issued Size: 64 x 42 cm Unsigned This is an unsign...
Category

1960s Marc Chagall Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

The Artist and Biblical Themes, 1974 (M.722)
By Marc Chagall
Located in Greenwich, CT
The Artist and Biblical Themes (M.722) is a lithograph on japon nacre paper, signed 'Marc Chagall' lower right and numbered VIII/X lower left from the edition of 64 (there were also ...
Category

20th Century Modern Marc Chagall Prints and Multiples

Materials

Paper, Lithograph

Marc Chagall -- The complete set of 10 lithograp of La Féerie et le Royaume
By Marc Chagall
Located in BRUCE, ACT
MARC CHAGALL Camille Bourniquel, La Féerie et le Royaume, Fernand Mourlot, Paris, 1972 (M. 668-677; C. books 88) The complete set of ten lithographs in colors, 1972 Hors-texte, title...
Category

1970s Marc Chagall Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

Regards sur Paris-The Place de la Concord (Mourlot 353; Cramer 53), Marc Chagall
By Marc Chagall
Located in Auburn Hills, MI
Original Limited Edition Lithograph on Arches paper. Edition: 180, plus proofs. Inscription: unsigned and unnumbered, as issued. Excellent Condition; never framed or matted. Notes: E...
Category

1960s Expressionist Marc Chagall Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

Marc Chagall "Dédicace"
By Marc Chagall
Located in Van Nuys, CA
Marc Chagall (French/Russian, 1887-1985) "Dédicace" 1968 Color lithograph signed and numbered 28/50 in pencil Image: 17 7/8 x 15 1/4 inches. Framed: 38 x 34 1/4 x 2 1/4 inches. ...
Category

Mid-19th Century Surrealist Marc Chagall Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

Quai de la Tournelle (Mourlot 351; Cramer 53), Marc Chagall
By Marc Chagall
Located in Auburn Hills, MI
Original Limited Edition Lithograph on Arches paper. Edition: 180, plus proofs. Inscription: unsigned and unnumbered, as issued. Excellent Condition, with centerfold, as issued; neve...
Category

1960s Expressionist Marc Chagall Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

The House in My Village, from 1960 Mourlot Lithographe I
By Marc Chagall
Located in Washington, DC
Artist: Marc Chagall Title: The House in My Village Portfolio: Mourlot Lithographe I Medium: Lithograph Year: 1960 Edition: Unnumbered Framed Size: 21 7/8" x 18 7/8" Image Size: 12 1...
Category

1960s Modern Marc Chagall Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

Acrobats at Play, from 1963 Mourlot Lithographe II
By Marc Chagall
Located in Washington, DC
Artist: Marc Chagall Title: Acrobats at Play Portfolio: Mourlot Lithographe II Medium: Lithograph Date: 1963 Edition: Unnumbered Frame Size: 21 7/8" x 18 7/8" Sheet Size: 12 3/4" x 9...
Category

1960s Modern Marc Chagall Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

LE JARDIN DE POMONE
By Marc Chagall
Located in New York, NY
A very good impression of this color lithograph. Signed and numbered 38/50 in pencil by Chagall. Catalogue reference: Mourlot 541
Category

1960s Modern Marc Chagall Prints and Multiples

Materials

Color, Lithograph

Woman Juggler, from 1960 Mourlot Lithographe I
By Marc Chagall
Located in Washington, DC
Artist: Marc Chagall Title: Woman Juggler Portfolio: Mourlot Lithographe I Medium: Lithograph Year: 1960 Edition: Unnumbered Framed Size: 21 7/8" x 18 7/8" Image Size: 12 1/2" x 9 1/...
Category

1960s Modern Marc Chagall Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

Apparition at the Circus, from 1963 Mourlot Lithographe II
By Marc Chagall
Located in Washington, DC
Artist: Marc Chagall Title: Apparition at the Circus Portfolio: Mourlot Lithographe II Medium: Lithograph Date: 1963 Edition: Unnumbered Frame Size: 21 7/8" x 18 7/8" Sheet Size: 12 ...
Category

1960s Modern Marc Chagall Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

The Angel, from 1960 Mourlot Lithographe I
By Marc Chagall
Located in Washington, DC
Artist: Marc Chagall Title: The Angel Portfolio: Mourlot Lithographe I Medium: Lithograph Year: 1960 Edition: Unnumbered Framed Size: 21 7/8" x 18 7/8" Image Size: 12 1/2" x 9 1/2" S...
Category

1960s Modern Marc Chagall Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

The Circus, from 1960 Mourlot Lithographe I
By Marc Chagall
Located in Washington, DC
Artist: Marc Chagall Title: The Circus Portfolio: Mourlot Lithographe I Medium: Lithograph Year: 1960 Edition: Unnumbered Framed Size: 21 7/8" x 18 7/8" Image Size: 12 1/2" x 9 1/2" ...
Category

1960s Modern Marc Chagall Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

Self-Portrait (Frontispiece), from 1960 Mourlot Lithographe I
By Marc Chagall
Located in Washington, DC
Artist: Marc Chagall Title: Self-Portrait (Frontispiece) Portfolio: Mourlot Lithographe I Medium: Lithograph Date: 1960 Edition: Unnumbered Frame Size: 21 7/8" x 18 7/8" Sheet Size: ...
Category

1960s Marc Chagall Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

Nocturne at Vence, from 1963 Mourlot Lithographe II
By Marc Chagall
Located in Washington, DC
Artist: Marc Chagall Title: Nocturne at Vence Portfolio: Mourlot Lithographe II Medium: Lithograph Date: 1963 Edition: Unnumbered Frame Size: 21 7/8" x 18 7/8" Sheet Size: 12 3/4" x ...
Category

1960s Modern Marc Chagall Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

Inspiration, from 1963 Mourlot Lithographe II
By Marc Chagall
Located in Washington, DC
Artist: Marc Chagall Title: Inspiration Portfolio: Mourlot Lithographe II Medium: Lithograph Date: 1963 Edition: Unnumbered Frame Size: 21 7/8" x 18 7/8" Sheet Size: 12 3/4" x 9 5/8"...
Category

1960s Modern Marc Chagall Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

Profile and Red Child, from 1960 Mourlot Lithographe I
By Marc Chagall
Located in Washington, DC
Artist: Marc Chagall Title: Profile and Red Child Portfolio: Mourlot Lithographe I Medium: Lithograph Year: 1960 Edition: Unnumbered Framed Size: 21 7/8" x 18 7/8" Image Size: 12 1/2...
Category

1960s Modern Marc Chagall Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

The Clown with Flowers, from 1963 Mourlot Lithographe II
By Marc Chagall
Located in Washington, DC
Artist: Marc Chagall Title: The Clown with Flowers Portfolio: Mourlot Lithographe II Medium: Lithograph Date: 1963 Edition: Unnumbered Frame Size: 21 7/8" x 18 7/8" Sheet Size: 12 3/...
Category

1960s Modern Marc Chagall Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

"Boaz wakes up and sees Ruth at his feet" original lithograph
By Marc Chagall
Located in Henderson, NV
Medium: original lithograph. Printed by Mourlot and published in Paris by Teriade for the art revue Verve in 1960 for a special edition devoted exclusively to Chagall's original Bibl...
Category

1960s Marc Chagall Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

The Lovers' Heaven, from 1963 Mourlot Lithographe II
By Marc Chagall
Located in Washington, DC
Artist: Marc Chagall Title: The Lovers' Heaven Portfolio: Mourlot Lithographe II Medium: Lithograph Date: 1963 Edition: Unnumbered Frame Size: 20 1/2" x 17 1/2" Sheet Size: 12 3/4" x...
Category

1960s Marc Chagall Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

Marc Chagall - Moses - Original Lithograph
By Marc Chagall
Located in Collonge Bellerive, Geneve, CH
Marc Chagall, Original Lithograph depicting an instant of the Bible. Technique: Original lithograph in colours Year: 1956 Sizes: 35,5 x 26 cm / 14" x 10.2" (sheet) Published by: Éditions de la Revue Verve, Tériade, Paris Printed by: Atelier Mourlot, Paris Documentation / References: Mourlot, F., Chagall Lithograph [II] 1957-1962, A. Sauret, Monte Carlo 1963, nos. 234 and 257 Marc Chagall (born in 1887) Marc Chagall was born in Belarus in 1887 and developed an early interest in art. After studying painting, in 1907 he left Russia for Paris, where he lived in an artist colony on the city’s outskirts. Fusing his own personal, dreamlike imagery with hints of the fauvism and cubism popular in France at the time, Chagall created his most lasting work—including I and the Village (1911)—some of which would be featured in the Salon des Indépendants exhibitions. After returning to Vitebsk for a visit in 1914, the outbreak of WWI trapped Chagall in Russia. He returned to France in 1923 but was forced to flee the country and Nazi persecution during WWII. Finding asylum in the U.S., Chagall became involved in set and costume design before returning to France in 1948. In his later years, he experimented with new art forms and was commissioned to produce numerous large-scale works. Chagall died in St.-Paul-de-Vence in 1985. The Village Marc Chagall was born in a small Hassidic community on the outskirts of Vitebsk, Belarus, on July 7, 1887. His father was a fishmonger, and his mother ran a small sundries shop in the village. As a child, Chagall attended the Jewish elementary school, where he studied Hebrew and the Bible, before later attending the Russian public school. He began to learn the fundamentals of drawing during this time, but perhaps more importantly, he absorbed the world around him, storing away the imagery and themes that would feature largely in most of his later work. At age 19 Chagall enrolled at a private, all-Jewish art school and began his formal education in painting, studying briefly with portrait artist Yehuda Pen. However, he left the school after several months, moving to St. Petersburg in 1907 to study at the Imperial Society for the Protection of Fine Arts. The following year, he enrolled at the Svanseva School, studying with set designer Léon Bakst, whose work had been featured in Sergei Diaghilev's Ballets Russes. This early experience would prove important to Chagall’s later career as well. Despite this formal instruction, and the widespread popularity of realism in Russia at the time, Chagall was already establishing his own personal style, which featured a more dreamlike unreality and the people, places and imagery that were close to his heart. Some examples from this period are his Window Vitebsk (1908) and My Fianceé with Black Gloves (1909), which pictured Bella Rosenfeld, to whom he had recently become engaged. The Beehive Despite his romance with Bella, in 1911 an allowance from Russian parliament member and art patron Maxim Binaver enabled Chagall to move to Paris, France. After settling briefly in the Montparnasse neighborhood, Chagall moved further afield to an artist colony known as La Ruche (“The Beehive”), where he began to work side by side with abstract painters such as Amedeo Modigliani and Fernand Léger as well as the avant-garde poet Guillaume Apollinaire. At their urging, and under the influence of the wildly popular fauvism and cubism, Chagall lightened his palette and pushed his style ever further from reality. I and the Village (1911) and Homage to Apollinaire (1912) are among his early Parisian works, widely considered to be his most successful and representative period. Though his work stood stylistically apart from his cubist contemporaries, from 1912 to 1914 Chagall exhibited several paintings at the annual Salon des Indépendants exhibition, where works by the likes of Juan Gris, Marcel Duchamp and Robert Delaunay were causing a stir in the Paris art world. Chagall’s popularity began to spread beyond La Ruche, and in May 1914 he traveled to Berlin to help organize his first solo exhibition, at Der Sturm Gallery. Chagall remained in the city until the highly acclaimed show opened that June. He then returned to Vitebsk, unaware of the fateful events to come. War, Peace and Revolution In August 1914 the outbreak of World War I precluded Chagall’s plans to return to Paris. The conflict did little to stem the flow of his creative output, however, instead merely giving him direct access to the childhood scenes so essential to his work, as seen in paintings such as Jew in Green (1914) and Over Vitebsk (1914). His paintings from this period also occasionally featured images of the war’s impact on the region, as with Wounded Soldier (1914) and Marching (1915). But despite the hardships of life during wartime, this would also prove to be a joyful period for Chagall. In July 1915 he married Bella, and she gave birth to a daughter, Ida, the following year. Their appearance in works such as Birthday (1915), Bella and Ida by the Window (1917) and several of his “Lovers” paintings give a glimpse of the island of domestic bliss that was Chagall’s amidst the chaos. To avoid military service and stay with his new family, Chagall took a position as a clerk in the Ministry of War Economy in St. Petersburg. While there he began work on his autobiography and also immersed himself in the local art scene, befriending novelist Boris Pasternak, among others. He also exhibited his work in the city and soon gained considerable recognition. That notoriety would prove important in the aftermath of the 1917 Russian Revolution when he was appointed as the Commissar of Fine Arts in Vitebsk. In his new post, Chagall undertook various projects in the region, including the 1919 founding of the Academy of the Arts. Despite these endeavors, differences among his colleagues eventually disillusioned Chagall. In 1920 he relinquished his position and moved his family to Moscow, the post-revolution capital of Russia. In Moscow, Chagall was soon commissioned to create sets and costumes for various productions at the Moscow State Yiddish...
Category

1950s Modern Marc Chagall Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

Marc Chagall - Original Lithograph
By Marc Chagall
Located in Collonge Bellerive, Geneve, CH
Marc Chagall Original Lithograph 1963 Dimensions: 32 x 24 cm Reference: Chagall Lithographe 1957-1962. VOLUME II. Unsigned edition of over 5,000 Condition : Excellent Marc Chagall (born in 1887) Marc Chagall was born in Belarus in 1887 and developed an early interest in art. After studying painting, in 1907 he left Russia for Paris, where he lived in an artist colony on the city’s outskirts. Fusing his own personal, dreamlike imagery with hints of the fauvism and cubism popular in France at the time, Chagall created his most lasting work—including I and the Village (1911)—some of which would be featured in the Salon des Indépendants exhibitions. After returning to Vitebsk for a visit in 1914, the outbreak of WWI trapped Chagall in Russia. He returned to France in 1923 but was forced to flee the country and Nazi persecution during WWII. Finding asylum in the U.S., Chagall became involved in set and costume design before returning to France in 1948. In his later years, he experimented with new art forms and was commissioned to produce numerous large-scale works. Chagall died in St.-Paul-de-Vence in 1985. The Village Marc Chagall was born in a small Hassidic community on the outskirts of Vitebsk, Belarus, on July 7, 1887. His father was a fishmonger, and his mother ran a small sundries shop in the village. As a child, Chagall attended the Jewish elementary school, where he studied Hebrew and the Bible, before later attending the Russian public school. He began to learn the fundamentals of drawing during this time, but perhaps more importantly, he absorbed the world around him, storing away the imagery and themes that would feature largely in most of his later work. At age 19 Chagall enrolled at a private, all-Jewish art school and began his formal education in painting, studying briefly with portrait artist Yehuda Pen. However, he left the school after several months, moving to St. Petersburg in 1907 to study at the Imperial Society for the Protection of Fine Arts. The following year, he enrolled at the Svanseva School, studying with set designer Léon Bakst, whose work had been featured in Sergei Diaghilev's Ballets Russes. This early experience would prove important to Chagall’s later career as well. Despite this formal instruction, and the widespread popularity of realism in Russia at the time, Chagall was already establishing his own personal style, which featured a more dreamlike unreality and the people, places and imagery that were close to his heart. Some examples from this period are his Window Vitebsk (1908) and My Fianceé with Black Gloves (1909), which pictured Bella Rosenfeld, to whom he had recently become engaged. The Beehive Despite his romance with Bella, in 1911 an allowance from Russian parliament member and art patron Maxim Binaver enabled Chagall to move to Paris, France. After settling briefly in the Montparnasse neighborhood, Chagall moved further afield to an artist colony known as La Ruche (“The Beehive”), where he began to work side by side with abstract painters such as Amedeo Modigliani and Fernand Léger as well as the avant-garde poet Guillaume Apollinaire. At their urging, and under the influence of the wildly popular fauvism and cubism, Chagall lightened his palette and pushed his style ever further from reality. I and the Village (1911) and Homage to Apollinaire (1912) are among his early Parisian works, widely considered to be his most successful and representative period. Though his work stood stylistically apart from his cubist contemporaries, from 1912 to 1914 Chagall exhibited several paintings at the annual Salon des Indépendants exhibition, where works by the likes of Juan Gris, Marcel Duchamp and Robert Delaunay were causing a stir in the Paris art world. Chagall’s popularity began to spread beyond La Ruche, and in May 1914 he traveled to Berlin to help organize his first solo exhibition, at Der Sturm Gallery. Chagall remained in the city until the highly acclaimed show opened that June. He then returned to Vitebsk, unaware of the fateful events to come. War, Peace and Revolution In August 1914 the outbreak of World War I precluded Chagall’s plans to return to Paris. The conflict did little to stem the flow of his creative output, however, instead merely giving him direct access to the childhood scenes so essential to his work, as seen in paintings such as Jew in Green (1914) and Over Vitebsk (1914). His paintings from this period also occasionally featured images of the war’s impact on the region, as with Wounded Soldier (1914) and Marching (1915). But despite the hardships of life during wartime, this would also prove to be a joyful period for Chagall. In July 1915 he married Bella, and she gave birth to a daughter, Ida, the following year. Their appearance in works such as Birthday (1915), Bella and Ida by the Window (1917) and several of his “Lovers” paintings give a glimpse of the island of domestic bliss that was Chagall’s amidst the chaos. To avoid military service and stay with his new family, Chagall took a position as a clerk in the Ministry of War Economy in St. Petersburg. While there he began work on his autobiography and also immersed himself in the local art scene, befriending novelist Boris Pasternak, among others. He also exhibited his work in the city and soon gained considerable recognition. That notoriety would prove important in the aftermath of the 1917 Russian Revolution when he was appointed as the Commissar of Fine Arts in Vitebsk. In his new post, Chagall undertook various projects in the region, including the 1919 founding of the Academy of the Arts. Despite these endeavors, differences among his colleagues eventually disillusioned Chagall. In 1920 he relinquished his position and moved his family to Moscow, the post-revolution capital of Russia. In Moscow, Chagall was soon commissioned to create sets and costumes for various productions at the Moscow State Yiddish...
Category

1960s Surrealist Marc Chagall Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

Marc Chagall - Flowered Clown - Original Lithograph
By Marc Chagall
Located in Collonge Bellerive, Geneve, CH
Marc Chagall Original Lithograph 1963 Dimensions: 32 x 24 cm From Chagall Lithograph II Reference: Mourlot 399 Condition : Excellent Unsigned and unumbered as issued
Category

1960s Surrealist Marc Chagall Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

Marc Chagall - Original Lithograph
By Marc Chagall
Located in Collonge Bellerive, Geneve, CH
Marc Chagall Original Lithograph 1963 Dimensions: 32 x 24 cm Reference: Chagall Lithographe 1957-1962. VOLUME II. Condition : Excellent Marc Chagall (born in 1887) Marc Chagall was born in Belarus in 1887 and developed an early interest in art. After studying painting, in 1907 he left Russia for Paris, where he lived in an artist colony on the city’s outskirts. Fusing his own personal, dreamlike imagery with hints of the fauvism and cubism popular in France at the time, Chagall created his most lasting work—including I and the Village (1911)—some of which would be featured in the Salon des Indépendants exhibitions. After returning to Vitebsk for a visit in 1914, the outbreak of WWI trapped Chagall in Russia. He returned to France in 1923 but was forced to flee the country and Nazi persecution during WWII. Finding asylum in the U.S., Chagall became involved in set and costume design before returning to France in 1948. In his later years, he experimented with new art forms and was commissioned to produce numerous large-scale works. Chagall died in St.-Paul-de-Vence in 1985. The Village Marc Chagall was born in a small Hassidic community on the outskirts of Vitebsk, Belarus, on July 7, 1887. His father was a fishmonger, and his mother ran a small sundries shop in the village. As a child, Chagall attended the Jewish elementary school, where he studied Hebrew and the Bible, before later attending the Russian public school. He began to learn the fundamentals of drawing during this time, but perhaps more importantly, he absorbed the world around him, storing away the imagery and themes that would feature largely in most of his later work. At age 19 Chagall enrolled at a private, all-Jewish art school and began his formal education in painting, studying briefly with portrait artist Yehuda Pen. However, he left the school after several months, moving to St. Petersburg in 1907 to study at the Imperial Society for the Protection of Fine Arts. The following year, he enrolled at the Svanseva School, studying with set designer Léon Bakst, whose work had been featured in Sergei Diaghilev's Ballets Russes. This early experience would prove important to Chagall’s later career as well. Despite this formal instruction, and the widespread popularity of realism in Russia at the time, Chagall was already establishing his own personal style, which featured a more dreamlike unreality and the people, places and imagery that were close to his heart. Some examples from this period are his Window Vitebsk (1908) and My Fianceé with Black Gloves (1909), which pictured Bella Rosenfeld, to whom he had recently become engaged. The Beehive Despite his romance with Bella, in 1911 an allowance from Russian parliament member and art patron Maxim Binaver enabled Chagall to move to Paris, France. After settling briefly in the Montparnasse neighborhood, Chagall moved further afield to an artist colony known as La Ruche (“The Beehive”), where he began to work side by side with abstract painters such as Amedeo Modigliani and Fernand Léger as well as the avant-garde poet Guillaume Apollinaire. At their urging, and under the influence of the wildly popular fauvism and cubism, Chagall lightened his palette and pushed his style ever further from reality. I and the Village (1911) and Homage to Apollinaire (1912) are among his early Parisian works, widely considered to be his most successful and representative period. Though his work stood stylistically apart from his cubist contemporaries, from 1912 to 1914 Chagall exhibited several paintings at the annual Salon des Indépendants exhibition, where works by the likes of Juan Gris, Marcel Duchamp and Robert Delaunay were causing a stir in the Paris art world. Chagall’s popularity began to spread beyond La Ruche, and in May 1914 he traveled to Berlin to help organize his first solo exhibition, at Der Sturm Gallery. Chagall remained in the city until the highly acclaimed show opened that June. He then returned to Vitebsk, unaware of the fateful events to come. War, Peace and Revolution In August 1914 the outbreak of World War I precluded Chagall’s plans to return to Paris. The conflict did little to stem the flow of his creative output, however, instead merely giving him direct access to the childhood scenes so essential to his work, as seen in paintings such as Jew in Green (1914) and Over Vitebsk (1914). His paintings from this period also occasionally featured images of the war’s impact on the region, as with Wounded Soldier (1914) and Marching (1915). But despite the hardships of life during wartime, this would also prove to be a joyful period for Chagall. In July 1915 he married Bella, and she gave birth to a daughter, Ida, the following year. Their appearance in works such as Birthday (1915), Bella and Ida by the Window (1917) and several of his “Lovers” paintings give a glimpse of the island of domestic bliss that was Chagall’s amidst the chaos. To avoid military service and stay with his new family, Chagall took a position as a clerk in the Ministry of War Economy in St. Petersburg. While there he began work on his autobiography and also immersed himself in the local art scene, befriending novelist Boris Pasternak, among others. He also exhibited his work in the city and soon gained considerable recognition. That notoriety would prove important in the aftermath of the 1917 Russian Revolution when he was appointed as the Commissar of Fine Arts in Vitebsk. In his new post, Chagall undertook various projects in the region, including the 1919 founding of the Academy of the Arts. Despite these endeavors, differences among his colleagues eventually disillusioned Chagall. In 1920 he relinquished his position and moved his family to Moscow, the post-revolution capital of Russia. In Moscow, Chagall was soon commissioned to create sets and costumes for various productions at the Moscow State Yiddish Theater...
Category

1960s Surrealist Marc Chagall Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

Marc Chagall - Inspiration - Original Lithograph from "Chagall Lithographe" v. 2
By Marc Chagall
Located in Collonge Bellerive, Geneve, CH
Marc Chagall Original Lithograph from Chagall Lithographe 1957-1962. VOLUME II. 1963 Dimensions: 32 x 24 cm From the unsigned edition of 10000 copies without margins Reference: Mourlot 398 Condition : Excellent Marc Chagall (born in 1887) Marc Chagall was born in Belarus in 1887 and developed an early interest in art. After studying painting, in 1907 he left Russia for Paris, where he lived in an artist colony on the city’s outskirts. Fusing his own personal, dreamlike imagery with hints of the fauvism and cubism popular in France at the time, Chagall created his most lasting work—including I and the Village (1911)—some of which would be featured in the Salon des Indépendants exhibitions. After returning to Vitebsk for a visit in 1914, the outbreak of WWI trapped Chagall in Russia. He returned to France in 1923 but was forced to flee the country and Nazi persecution during WWII. Finding asylum in the U.S., Chagall became involved in set and costume design before returning to France in 1948. In his later years, he experimented with new art forms and was commissioned to produce numerous large-scale works. Chagall died in St.-Paul-de-Vence in 1985. The Village Marc Chagall was born in a small Hassidic community on the outskirts of Vitebsk, Belarus, on July 7, 1887. His father was a fishmonger, and his mother ran a small sundries shop in the village. As a child, Chagall attended the Jewish elementary school, where he studied Hebrew and the Bible, before later attending the Russian public school. He began to learn the fundamentals of drawing during this time, but perhaps more importantly, he absorbed the world around him, storing away the imagery and themes that would feature largely in most of his later work. At age 19 Chagall enrolled at a private, all-Jewish art school and began his formal education in painting, studying briefly with portrait artist Yehuda Pen. However, he left the school after several months, moving to St. Petersburg in 1907 to study at the Imperial Society for the Protection of Fine Arts. The following year, he enrolled at the Svanseva School, studying with set designer Léon Bakst, whose work had been featured in Sergei Diaghilev's Ballets Russes. This early experience would prove important to Chagall’s later career as well. Despite this formal instruction, and the widespread popularity of realism in Russia at the time, Chagall was already establishing his own personal style, which featured a more dreamlike unreality and the people, places and imagery that were close to his heart. Some examples from this period are his Window Vitebsk (1908) and My Fianceé with Black Gloves (1909), which pictured Bella Rosenfeld, to whom he had recently become engaged. The Beehive Despite his romance with Bella, in 1911 an allowance from Russian parliament member and art patron Maxim Binaver enabled Chagall to move to Paris, France. After settling briefly in the Montparnasse neighborhood, Chagall moved further afield to an artist colony known as La Ruche (“The Beehive”), where he began to work side by side with abstract painters such as Amedeo Modigliani and Fernand Léger as well as the avant-garde poet Guillaume Apollinaire. At their urging, and under the influence of the wildly popular fauvism and cubism, Chagall lightened his palette and pushed his style ever further from reality. I and the Village (1911) and Homage to Apollinaire (1912) are among his early Parisian works, widely considered to be his most successful and representative period. Though his work stood stylistically apart from his cubist contemporaries, from 1912 to 1914 Chagall exhibited several paintings at the annual Salon des Indépendants exhibition, where works by the likes of Juan Gris, Marcel Duchamp and Robert Delaunay were causing a stir in the Paris art world. Chagall’s popularity began to spread beyond La Ruche, and in May 1914 he traveled to Berlin to help organize his first solo exhibition, at Der Sturm Gallery. Chagall remained in the city until the highly acclaimed show opened that June. He then returned to Vitebsk, unaware of the fateful events to come. War, Peace and Revolution In August 1914 the outbreak of World War I precluded Chagall’s plans to return to Paris. The conflict did little to stem the flow of his creative output, however, instead merely giving him direct access to the childhood scenes so essential to his work, as seen in paintings such as Jew in Green (1914) and Over Vitebsk (1914). His paintings from this period also occasionally featured images of the war’s impact on the region, as with Wounded Soldier (1914) and Marching (1915). But despite the hardships of life during wartime, this would also prove to be a joyful period for Chagall. In July 1915 he married Bella, and she gave birth to a daughter, Ida, the following year. Their appearance in works such as Birthday (1915), Bella and Ida by the Window (1917) and several of his “Lovers” paintings give a glimpse of the island of domestic bliss that was Chagall’s amidst the chaos. To avoid military service and stay with his new family, Chagall took a position as a clerk in the Ministry of War Economy in St. Petersburg. While there he began work on his autobiography and also immersed himself in the local art scene, befriending novelist Boris Pasternak, among others. He also exhibited his work in the city and soon gained considerable recognition. That notoriety would prove important in the aftermath of the 1917 Russian Revolution when he was appointed as the Commissar of Fine Arts in Vitebsk. In his new post, Chagall undertook various projects in the region, including the 1919 founding of the Academy of the Arts. Despite these endeavors, differences among his colleagues eventually disillusioned Chagall. In 1920 he relinquished his position and moved his family to Moscow, the post-revolution capital of Russia. In Moscow, Chagall was soon commissioned to create sets and costumes for various productions at the Moscow State Yiddish Theater...
Category

1960s Surrealist Marc Chagall Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

Marc Chagall - Moses with Tablets of Stone - Original Lithograph
By Marc Chagall
Located in Collonge Bellerive, Geneve, CH
Marc Chagall, Original Lithograph depicting an instant of the Bible. Technique: Original lithograph in colours Year: 1956 Sizes: 35,5 x 26 cm / 14" x 10.2" (sheet) Published by: Éditions de la Revue Verve, Tériade, Paris Printed by: Atelier Mourlot, Paris Documentation / References: Mourlot, F., Chagall Lithograph [II] 1957-1962, A. Sauret, Monte Carlo 1963, nos. 234 and 257 Marc Chagall (born in 1887) Marc Chagall was born in Belarus in 1887 and developed an early interest in art. After studying painting, in 1907 he left Russia for Paris, where he lived in an artist colony on the city’s outskirts. Fusing his own personal, dreamlike imagery with hints of the fauvism and cubism popular in France at the time, Chagall created his most lasting work—including I and the Village (1911)—some of which would be featured in the Salon des Indépendants exhibitions. After returning to Vitebsk for a visit in 1914, the outbreak of WWI trapped Chagall in Russia. He returned to France in 1923 but was forced to flee the country and Nazi persecution during WWII. Finding asylum in the U.S., Chagall became involved in set and costume design before returning to France in 1948. In his later years, he experimented with new art forms and was commissioned to produce numerous large-scale works. Chagall died in St.-Paul-de-Vence in 1985. The Village Marc Chagall was born in a small Hassidic community on the outskirts of Vitebsk, Belarus, on July 7, 1887. His father was a fishmonger, and his mother ran a small sundries shop in the village. As a child, Chagall attended the Jewish elementary school, where he studied Hebrew and the Bible, before later attending the Russian public school. He began to learn the fundamentals of drawing during this time, but perhaps more importantly, he absorbed the world around him, storing away the imagery and themes that would feature largely in most of his later work. At age 19 Chagall enrolled at a private, all-Jewish art school and began his formal education in painting, studying briefly with portrait artist Yehuda Pen. However, he left the school after several months, moving to St. Petersburg in 1907 to study at the Imperial Society for the Protection of Fine Arts. The following year, he enrolled at the Svanseva School, studying with set designer Léon Bakst, whose work had been featured in Sergei Diaghilev's Ballets Russes. This early experience would prove important to Chagall’s later career as well. Despite this formal instruction, and the widespread popularity of realism in Russia at the time, Chagall was already establishing his own personal style, which featured a more dreamlike unreality and the people, places and imagery that were close to his heart. Some examples from this period are his Window Vitebsk (1908) and My Fianceé with Black Gloves (1909), which pictured Bella Rosenfeld, to whom he had recently become engaged. The Beehive Despite his romance with Bella, in 1911 an allowance from Russian parliament member and art patron Maxim Binaver enabled Chagall to move to Paris, France. After settling briefly in the Montparnasse neighborhood, Chagall moved further afield to an artist colony known as La Ruche (“The Beehive”), where he began to work side by side with abstract painters such as Amedeo Modigliani and Fernand Léger as well as the avant-garde poet Guillaume Apollinaire. At their urging, and under the influence of the wildly popular fauvism and cubism, Chagall lightened his palette and pushed his style ever further from reality. I and the Village (1911) and Homage to Apollinaire (1912) are among his early Parisian works, widely considered to be his most successful and representative period. Though his work stood stylistically apart from his cubist contemporaries, from 1912 to 1914 Chagall exhibited several paintings at the annual Salon des Indépendants exhibition, where works by the likes of Juan Gris, Marcel Duchamp and Robert Delaunay were causing a stir in the Paris art world. Chagall’s popularity began to spread beyond La Ruche, and in May 1914 he traveled to Berlin to help organize his first solo exhibition, at Der Sturm Gallery. Chagall remained in the city until the highly acclaimed show opened that June. He then returned to Vitebsk, unaware of the fateful events to come. War, Peace and Revolution In August 1914 the outbreak of World War I precluded Chagall’s plans to return to Paris. The conflict did little to stem the flow of his creative output, however, instead merely giving him direct access to the childhood scenes so essential to his work, as seen in paintings such as Jew in Green (1914) and Over Vitebsk (1914). His paintings from this period also occasionally featured images of the war’s impact on the region, as with Wounded Soldier (1914) and Marching (1915). But despite the hardships of life during wartime, this would also prove to be a joyful period for Chagall. In July 1915 he married Bella, and she gave birth to a daughter, Ida, the following year. Their appearance in works such as Birthday (1915), Bella and Ida by the Window (1917) and several of his “Lovers” paintings give a glimpse of the island of domestic bliss that was Chagall’s amidst the chaos. To avoid military service and stay with his new family, Chagall took a position as a clerk in the Ministry of War Economy in St. Petersburg. While there he began work on his autobiography and also immersed himself in the local art scene, befriending novelist Boris Pasternak, among others. He also exhibited his work in the city and soon gained considerable recognition. That notoriety would prove important in the aftermath of the 1917 Russian Revolution when he was appointed as the Commissar of Fine Arts in Vitebsk. In his new post, Chagall undertook various projects in the region, including the 1919 founding of the Academy of the Arts. Despite these endeavors, differences among his colleagues eventually disillusioned Chagall. In 1920 he relinquished his position and moved his family to Moscow, the post-revolution capital of Russia. In Moscow, Chagall was soon commissioned to create sets and costumes for various productions at the Moscow State Yiddish...
Category

1950s Modern Marc Chagall Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

Marc Chagall - Original Lithograph
By Marc Chagall
Located in Collonge Bellerive, Geneve, CH
Marc Chagall Original Lithograph 1963 Dimensions: 32 x 24 cm Reference: Chagall Lithographe 1957-1962. VOLUME II. Condition : Excellent Marc Chagall (born in 1887) Marc Chagall was born in Belarus in 1887 and developed an early interest in art. After studying painting, in 1907 he left Russia for Paris, where he lived in an artist colony on the city’s outskirts. Fusing his own personal, dreamlike imagery with hints of the fauvism and cubism popular in France at the time, Chagall created his most lasting work—including I and the Village (1911)—some of which would be featured in the Salon des Indépendants exhibitions. After returning to Vitebsk for a visit in 1914, the outbreak of WWI trapped Chagall in Russia. He returned to France in 1923 but was forced to flee the country and Nazi persecution during WWII. Finding asylum in the U.S., Chagall became involved in set and costume design before returning to France in 1948. In his later years, he experimented with new art forms and was commissioned to produce numerous large-scale works. Chagall died in St.-Paul-de-Vence in 1985. The Village Marc Chagall was born in a small Hassidic community on the outskirts of Vitebsk, Belarus, on July 7, 1887. His father was a fishmonger, and his mother ran a small sundries shop in the village. As a child, Chagall attended the Jewish elementary school, where he studied Hebrew and the Bible, before later attending the Russian public school. He began to learn the fundamentals of drawing during this time, but perhaps more importantly, he absorbed the world around him, storing away the imagery and themes that would feature largely in most of his later work. At age 19 Chagall enrolled at a private, all-Jewish art school and began his formal education in painting, studying briefly with portrait artist Yehuda Pen. However, he left the school after several months, moving to St. Petersburg in 1907 to study at the Imperial Society for the Protection of Fine Arts. The following year, he enrolled at the Svanseva School, studying with set designer Léon Bakst, whose work had been featured in Sergei Diaghilev's Ballets Russes. This early experience would prove important to Chagall’s later career as well. Despite this formal instruction, and the widespread popularity of realism in Russia at the time, Chagall was already establishing his own personal style, which featured a more dreamlike unreality and the people, places and imagery that were close to his heart. Some examples from this period are his Window Vitebsk (1908) and My Fianceé with Black Gloves (1909), which pictured Bella Rosenfeld, to whom he had recently become engaged. The Beehive Despite his romance with Bella, in 1911 an allowance from Russian parliament member and art patron Maxim Binaver enabled Chagall to move to Paris, France. After settling briefly in the Montparnasse neighborhood, Chagall moved further afield to an artist colony known as La Ruche (“The Beehive”), where he began to work side by side with abstract painters such as Amedeo Modigliani and Fernand Léger as well as the avant-garde poet Guillaume Apollinaire. At their urging, and under the influence of the wildly popular fauvism and cubism, Chagall lightened his palette and pushed his style ever further from reality. I and the Village (1911) and Homage to Apollinaire (1912) are among his early Parisian works, widely considered to be his most successful and representative period. Though his work stood stylistically apart from his cubist contemporaries, from 1912 to 1914 Chagall exhibited several paintings at the annual Salon des Indépendants exhibition, where works by the likes of Juan Gris, Marcel Duchamp and Robert Delaunay were causing a stir in the Paris art world. Chagall’s popularity began to spread beyond La Ruche, and in May 1914 he traveled to Berlin to help organize his first solo exhibition, at Der Sturm Gallery. Chagall remained in the city until the highly acclaimed show opened that June. He then returned to Vitebsk, unaware of the fateful events to come. War, Peace and Revolution In August 1914 the outbreak of World War I precluded Chagall’s plans to return to Paris. The conflict did little to stem the flow of his creative output, however, instead merely giving him direct access to the childhood scenes so essential to his work, as seen in paintings such as Jew in Green (1914) and Over Vitebsk (1914). His paintings from this period also occasionally featured images of the war’s impact on the region, as with Wounded Soldier (1914) and Marching (1915). But despite the hardships of life during wartime, this would also prove to be a joyful period for Chagall. In July 1915 he married Bella, and she gave birth to a daughter, Ida, the following year. Their appearance in works such as Birthday (1915), Bella and Ida by the Window (1917) and several of his “Lovers” paintings give a glimpse of the island of domestic bliss that was Chagall’s amidst the chaos. To avoid military service and stay with his new family, Chagall took a position as a clerk in the Ministry of War Economy in St. Petersburg. While there he began work on his autobiography and also immersed himself in the local art scene, befriending novelist Boris Pasternak, among others. He also exhibited his work in the city and soon gained considerable recognition. That notoriety would prove important in the aftermath of the 1917 Russian Revolution when he was appointed as the Commissar of Fine Arts in Vitebsk. In his new post, Chagall undertook various projects in the region, including the 1919 founding of the Academy of the Arts. Despite these endeavors, differences among his colleagues eventually disillusioned Chagall. In 1920 he relinquished his position and moved his family to Moscow, the post-revolution capital of Russia. In Moscow, Chagall was soon commissioned to create sets and costumes for various productions at the Moscow State Yiddish Theater...
Category

1960s Surrealist Marc Chagall Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

Marc Chagall - Couple With a Goat - Original Lithograph
By Marc Chagall
Located in Collonge Bellerive, Geneve, CH
Marc Chagall Original Lithograph Title: Couple With a Goat 1970 Dimensions: 32 x 24 cm From the art revue XXè siècle Reference: Mourlot #608 Unsigned and unumbered as issued
Category

Mid-20th Century Surrealist Marc Chagall Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

Marc Chagall - Original Lithograph
By Marc Chagall
Located in Collonge Bellerive, Geneve, CH
Marc Chagall Original Lithograph 1963 Dimensions: 32 x 24 cm Reference: Chagall Lithographe 1957-1962. VOLUME II. Unsigned edition of over 5,000 Condition : Excellent Marc Chagall (born in 1887) Marc Chagall was born in Belarus in 1887 and developed an early interest in art. After studying painting, in 1907 he left Russia for Paris, where he lived in an artist colony on the city’s outskirts. Fusing his own personal, dreamlike imagery with hints of the fauvism and cubism popular in France at the time, Chagall created his most lasting work—including I and the Village (1911)—some of which would be featured in the Salon des Indépendants exhibitions. After returning to Vitebsk for a visit in 1914, the outbreak of WWI trapped Chagall in Russia. He returned to France in 1923 but was forced to flee the country and Nazi persecution during WWII. Finding asylum in the U.S., Chagall became involved in set and costume design before returning to France in 1948. In his later years, he experimented with new art forms and was commissioned to produce numerous large-scale works. Chagall died in St.-Paul-de-Vence in 1985. The Village Marc Chagall was born in a small Hassidic community on the outskirts of Vitebsk, Belarus, on July 7, 1887. His father was a fishmonger, and his mother ran a small sundries shop in the village. As a child, Chagall attended the Jewish elementary school, where he studied Hebrew and the Bible, before later attending the Russian public school. He began to learn the fundamentals of drawing during this time, but perhaps more importantly, he absorbed the world around him, storing away the imagery and themes that would feature largely in most of his later work. At age 19 Chagall enrolled at a private, all-Jewish art school and began his formal education in painting, studying briefly with portrait artist Yehuda Pen. However, he left the school after several months, moving to St. Petersburg in 1907 to study at the Imperial Society for the Protection of Fine Arts. The following year, he enrolled at the Svanseva School, studying with set designer Léon Bakst, whose work had been featured in Sergei Diaghilev's Ballets Russes. This early experience would prove important to Chagall’s later career as well. Despite this formal instruction, and the widespread popularity of realism in Russia at the time, Chagall was already establishing his own personal style, which featured a more dreamlike unreality and the people, places and imagery that were close to his heart. Some examples from this period are his Window Vitebsk (1908) and My Fianceé with Black Gloves (1909), which pictured Bella Rosenfeld, to whom he had recently become engaged. The Beehive Despite his romance with Bella, in 1911 an allowance from Russian parliament member and art patron Maxim Binaver enabled Chagall to move to Paris, France. After settling briefly in the Montparnasse neighborhood, Chagall moved further afield to an artist colony known as La Ruche (“The Beehive”), where he began to work side by side with abstract painters such as Amedeo Modigliani and Fernand Léger as well as the avant-garde poet Guillaume Apollinaire. At their urging, and under the influence of the wildly popular fauvism and cubism, Chagall lightened his palette and pushed his style ever further from reality. I and the Village (1911) and Homage to Apollinaire (1912) are among his early Parisian works, widely considered to be his most successful and representative period. Though his work stood stylistically apart from his cubist contemporaries, from 1912 to 1914 Chagall exhibited several paintings at the annual Salon des Indépendants exhibition, where works by the likes of Juan Gris, Marcel Duchamp and Robert Delaunay were causing a stir in the Paris art world. Chagall’s popularity began to spread beyond La Ruche, and in May 1914 he traveled to Berlin to help organize his first solo exhibition, at Der Sturm Gallery. Chagall remained in the city until the highly acclaimed show opened that June. He then returned to Vitebsk, unaware of the fateful events to come. War, Peace and Revolution In August 1914 the outbreak of World War I precluded Chagall’s plans to return to Paris. The conflict did little to stem the flow of his creative output, however, instead merely giving him direct access to the childhood scenes so essential to his work, as seen in paintings such as Jew in Green (1914) and Over Vitebsk (1914). His paintings from this period also occasionally featured images of the war’s impact on the region, as with Wounded Soldier (1914) and Marching (1915). But despite the hardships of life during wartime, this would also prove to be a joyful period for Chagall. In July 1915 he married Bella, and she gave birth to a daughter, Ida, the following year. Their appearance in works such as Birthday (1915), Bella and Ida by the Window (1917) and several of his “Lovers” paintings give a glimpse of the island of domestic bliss that was Chagall’s amidst the chaos. To avoid military service and stay with his new family, Chagall took a position as a clerk in the Ministry of War Economy in St. Petersburg. While there he began work on his autobiography and also immersed himself in the local art scene, befriending novelist Boris Pasternak, among others. He also exhibited his work in the city and soon gained considerable recognition. That notoriety would prove important in the aftermath of the 1917 Russian Revolution when he was appointed as the Commissar of Fine Arts in Vitebsk. In his new post, Chagall undertook various projects in the region, including the 1919 founding of the Academy of the Arts. Despite these endeavors, differences among his colleagues eventually disillusioned Chagall. In 1920 he relinquished his position and moved his family to Moscow, the post-revolution capital of Russia. In Moscow, Chagall was soon commissioned to create sets and costumes for various productions at the Moscow State Yiddish...
Category

1960s Surrealist Marc Chagall Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

"Cain and Abel" original lithograph
By Marc Chagall
Located in Henderson, NV
Medium: original lithograph. Printed by Mourlot and published in Paris by Teriade for the art revue Verve in 1960 for a special edition devoted exclusively to Chagall's original Bibl...
Category

1960s Marc Chagall Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

original lithograph
By Marc Chagall
Located in Henderson, NV
Medium: original lithograph. Catalogue reference: Mourlot 608. Printed in Paris at the atelier Mourlot in 1970 for the art revue XXe Siecle (No. 34) and published by San Lazzaro. Siz...
Category

1970s Marc Chagall Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

"Moses and his People" original lithograph
By Marc Chagall
Located in Henderson, NV
Medium: original color lithograph. Catalogue reference: M 689. Executed in 1973 for the "The Biblical Message of Marc Chagall" and printed in Paris by Mourlot on wove paper. Size: 12...
Category

1970s Marc Chagall Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

"Moses with the Tablets of Law" original lithograph
By Marc Chagall
Located in Henderson, NV
Medium: original lithograph. Printed by Mourlot and published in Paris by Teriade for Verve in 1956 for a special edition devoted exclusively to Chagall's original Bible art. Size: 1...
Category

1950s Marc Chagall Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

Bonjour Paris
By Marc Chagall
Located in Paris, FR
Lithograph, 1972 Signed on the plate Edition : 865/5000 Publisher : Mourlot (Paris) Printer : Mourlot (Paris) Catalog : CS43 70.50 cm. x 56.20 cm. | 27.76 in. x 22.13 in. (paper) 63...
Category

1970s Abstract Marc Chagall Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

Autoportrait avec chèvre (Self Portrait with Goat)
By Marc Chagall
Located in Chicago, IL
Signed Chagall/Marc in blue watercolor (lower right); inscribed in pencil (right margin); inscribed by another hand épreuve rehaussée (left margin) The authenticity of this work has...
Category

Early 20th Century Marc Chagall Prints and Multiples

Materials

Watercolor, Lithograph

"Daniel in the Lion's Den" original lithograph
By Marc Chagall
Located in Henderson, NV
Medium: original lithograph. Printed by Mourlot and published in Paris by Teriade for Verve in 1956 for a special edition devoted exclusively to Chagall's original Bible art. Size: 1...
Category

1950s Marc Chagall Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

"Angel" original lithograph
By Marc Chagall
Located in Henderson, NV
Medium: original lithograph. Printed by Mourlot and published in Paris by Teriade for Verve in 1956 for a special edition devoted exclusively to Chagall's original Bible art. Size: 1...
Category

1950s Marc Chagall Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

Chagall At Pace/Columbus - Marc Chagall - Lithography
By Marc Chagall
Located in Winterswijk, NL
"Chagall At Pace/Columbus" by Marc Chagall Exhibition poster Color offset lithography Signed in the print Publisher: Pace Gallery, Columbus
Category

1970s Expressionist Marc Chagall Prints and Multiples

Materials

Color, Lithograph

Song of Songs - Lithograph by Marc Chagall - 1960s
By Marc Chagall
Located in Roma, IT
Song of Songs is an artwork realized by Marc Chagall, 1960s. Lithograph on brown-toned paper, no signature. Lithograph on both sheets. Edition of 6500 unsigned lithographs. Printe...
Category

1960s Surrealist Marc Chagall Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

Psalm - Lithograph by Marc Chagall - 1960s
By Marc Chagall
Located in Roma, IT
Psaume is an artwork realized by March Chagall, 1960s. Lithograph on brown-toned paper, no signature. Lithograph on both sheets. Edition of 6500 unsigned lithographs. Printed by M...
Category

1960s Surrealist Marc Chagall Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

1954 Original poster Kunsthall Bern - "Les affiches de Chagall # 5 L'ange "
By Marc Chagall
Located in PARIS, FR
In the realm of artistic mastery, Marc Chagall emerges as a luminary, renowned for his ethereal and enchanting creations. Born in Vitebsk, Russia, in 1887, Chagall's artistic journey took him from the bohemian streets of Montmartre to the global stage. A trailblazer in the world of modern art, Chagall's work is characterized by a harmonious blend of whimsy, symbolism, and a deep connection to his Jewish heritage. The 1956 Kunsthalle Bern poster...
Category

1950s Marc Chagall Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph, Paper, Linen

MARC CHAGALL "DAY BREAK - 1983"
By Marc Chagall
Located in Pembroke Pines, FL
MARC CHAGALL (1887-1985) "Day Break" lithograph in colours, 1983, on wove paper. Signed in pencil, Numbered 26/50 in pencil 21.5 x 17 Inches. LITERATURE: Mourlot 1014 CONDITION: Exce...
Category

1980s Contemporary Marc Chagall Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

The Red Rooster | Le coq rouge - Circus French Russia
By Marc Chagall
Located in London, GB
This original lithograph in colours is hand signed in pencil by the artist "Marc Chagall" at the lower right margin. It is also numbered in pencil from the edition of 200, at the low...
Category

1950s Marc Chagall Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

Psalm - Lithograph by Marc Chagall - 1960s
By Marc Chagall
Located in Roma, IT
Psalm is an artwork realized by March Chagall, 1960s. Lithograph on brown-toned paper, no signature. Lithograph on both sheets. Edition of 6500 unsigned lithographs. Printed by Mo...
Category

1960s Surrealist Marc Chagall Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

Marc Chagall The Accordionist
By Marc Chagall
Located in Washington, DC
Artist: Marc Chagall Title: The Accordionist (Derriere le Miroir 99-100) Portfolio: Derriere le Miroir Medium: Original Lithograph Date: 1957 Edition: 2500...
Category

1950s Marc Chagall Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

Conclusion de l'Ecclésiaste - Lithograph by Marc Chagall - 1960s
By Marc Chagall
Located in Roma, IT
Conclusion de l'ecclésiaste is an artwork realized by March Chagall, 1960s. Lithograph on brown-toned paper, no signature. Lithograph on both sheets. Edition of 6500 unsigned lith...
Category

1960s Surrealist Marc Chagall Prints and Multiples

Materials

Lithograph

Marc Chagall prints and multiples for sale on 1stDibs

1stDibs offers a wide variety of authentic Marc Chagall prints and multiples for sale. You can find work that includes elements of blue, orange, pink and other colors if you are browsing the collection of prints and multiples to introduce a pop of color in a neutral corner of your living room or bedroom. You can also browse by medium to find art by Marc Chagall in aquatint, etching, lithograph and more. Much of the original work by this artist or collective was created during the 20th Century and is mostly associated with the Modern style. Not every interior allows for large Marc Chagall prints and multiples, so small editions measuring 4.139999866485596 inches across are available. Customers who are interested in this artist might also find the works of Jean Cocteau, Pablo Picasso and Alexander Calder. On 1stDibs, the price for these items starts at US$75 and tops out at US$475,000, while the average work can sell for US$1,439.

Questions About Marc Chagall Prints and Multiples
  • 1stDibs ExpertApril 5, 2022
    One of Marc Chagall’s most known works is entitled I and the Village. His style mixes bold colors in both the cubism and fauvism style. Shop a selection of Marc Chagall’s pieces from some of the world’s top art dealers on 1stDibs.
  • 1stDibs ExpertMarch 22, 2022
    Marc Chagall was a painter, illustrator, glass artisan, print maker and set designer who made a lasting impact on modern art. He was born on July 7, 1887, in Liozna, Belarus, and died on March 28, 1985, in Saint Paul de Vence, France. On 1stDibs, shop a selection of Marc Chagall art.
  • 1stDibs ExpertMarch 22, 2022
    Marc Chagall is famous for creating art in a variety of mediums using a unique style that built off the principles of Cubism, Surrealism and other artistic movements. Some of his most well-known works include I and the Village, White Crucifixion, American Windows and The Fiddler. On 1stDibs, shop a collection of Marc Chagall art.
  • 1stDibs ExpertMarch 22, 2022
    To pronounce Marc Chagall, say "Mark Shu-GALL." The artist's real name was Moishe Shagal. Although the artist changed his name, he referenced his heritage in many works by including fish to represent his father who worked as a herring merchant. Shop a variety of Marc Chagall art on 1stDibs.
  • 1stDibs ExpertMarch 22, 2022
    To collect Marc Chagall art, search out works of art from reputable sources. You can shop the collections of art dealers, auction houses and trusted online platforms to find authentic paintings, prints and other works produced by the artist. Shop a selection of expertly vetted Marc Chagall art on 1stDibs.
  • 1stDibs ExpertMarch 22, 2022
    Marc Chagall was born on July 7, 1887, in Liozna, Belarus. He was an influential artist who worked in a variety of mediums, including paint, stained glass and illustrations. Chagall died on March 28, 1985, in Saint Paul de Vence, France. On 1stDibs, find a collection of Marc Chagall art.
  • 1stDibs ExpertMarch 22, 2022
    Marc Chagall was born in Liozna, Belarus on July 7, 1887. He went on to become one of the most influential artists of the 20th century, creating works that drew from the movements of Cubism, Surrealism and Fauvism. On 1stDibs, find a selection of Marc Chagall art.
  • 1stDibs ExpertMarch 22, 2022
    Many artists and things inspired Marc Chagall. Historians believe that his Jewish heritage and his hometown of Liozna, Belarus, served as sources of inspiration throughout his life. His work also displays the influence of surrealist, cubist, symbolist and fauve artists. On 1stDibs, shop a variety of Marc Chagall art.
  • 1stDibs ExpertMarch 22, 2022
    Marc Chagall lived many places over the course of his life. He was born in Liozna, Belarus, on July 7, 1887. When he began working as an artist, he lived and worked in Saint Petersburg, Russia; Paris, France; and Berlin, Germany. During World War II, he relocated to the U.S. and then returned to Paris where he primarily resided until his death in 1985. On 1stDibs, find a variety of Marc Chagall art.
  • 1stDibs ExpertMarch 22, 2022
    Yes, Marc Chagall used expressionism in some of his works. You can see the trademark bright colors and dramatic brushstrokes of the movement reflected in works like his Vision of Paris and I and the Village. Find a selection of Marc Chagall art on 1stDibs.
  • 1stDibs ExpertMarch 22, 2022
    Marc Chagall worked in a variety of mediums and used a variety of materials over the course of his life as a result. His paintings are mostly oil on canvas. He also worked with stained glass, textiles and ceramics. On 1stDibs, find a range of Marc Chagall art.
  • 1stDibs ExpertSeptember 28, 2021
    A Marc Chagall painting is likely worth anywhere between $50,000 to $70,000 according to current estimates. Marc Chagall is a Russian-French artist of Belarusian Jewish origin who is credited to be among the pioneering modernists. Adept in several styles and techniques, Chagall was best-known for creating stain-glass, tapestries and murals apart from paintings. On 1stDibs, find a variety of Marc Chagall paintings.
  • 1stDibs ExpertFebruary 7, 2024
    Marc Chagall painted around 10,000 works during the course of his 75-year career. The Russian-French modernist worked in nearly every artistic medium. Influenced by Symbolism, Fauvism, Cubism and Surrealism, he developed his own distinctive style, combining avant-garde techniques and motifs with elements drawn from Eastern European Jewish folk art. On 1stDibs, find a selection of Marc Chagall art.
  • 1stDibs ExpertMarch 22, 2022
    Yes, Marc Chagall migrated to the United States. The Jewish artist fled Europe during World War II, moving to New York City in 1941. He settled in France in 1947 and lived there until he died in 1985. On 1stDibs, shop a range of Marc Chagall art.
  • 1stDibs ExpertMarch 22, 2022
    Historians estimate that Marc Chagall produced more than 1,000 works of art before his death in 1985 at the age of 97. He worked as a painter, a stained-glass artisan, an illustrator, a designer and a print maker. Find a range of Marc Chagall art on 1stDibs.
  • 1stDibs ExpertMarch 22, 2022
    Yes, Marc Chagall used oil paint to produce many of his paintings. He also worked with gouaches and watercolors. Not just a painter, Chagall made stained glass windows, illustrations, prints, ceramics and other types of works throughout his life. Find a collection of Marc Chagall art on 1stDibs.
  • 1stDibs ExpertMarch 22, 2022
    Yes, Marc Chagall personally signed some of his bookplates. Other bookplate illustrations created by the artist bear a reproduction of his signature. Many of the signed versions come from the collections of notable historical figures, including Nicholas II, the last Russian czar. Find a variety of Marc Chagall art on 1stDibs.

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